More urban wildlife

Tom Palacio writes:

“Loved your story about the turkey but Saturday at Spanos golf course I met this three-legged coyote the regulars call “Tri-pod”. I fed it a piece of my breakfast burrito and when we came back around after 9 holes, it approached us as if it recognized us from earlier. “ 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“It may have been wrong to feed a wild animal like that, but a city slicker just couldn’t resist. Seems others have been doing it for awhile otherwise how would it have overcome a coyote’s natural wariness of humans?”

Usually it’s wrong to feed wild animals. It’ll make them pesky to humans (at best) and dangerous (at worst). But perhaps an exception should be made for this guy. Hunting can’t be easy for a three-legged predator.

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  • Blog Author

    Michael Fitzgerald

    Mike Fitzgerald is The Record’s award-winning metro columnist. His column runs in the paper three times a week. Born in San Francisco, he was raised in Stockton. His column covers diverse beats including, sometimes, the offbeat. Read Full
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