Powerful forces join to fight childhood obesity

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the American Heart Association today announced an ambitious collaboration to reverse the nation’s childhood obesity epidemic by 2015. Building upon AHA’s extensive advocacy capacity and experience, RWJF will provide the association with $8 million in initial funding to create and manage an advocacy initiative focused on changing local, state and federal policies to help children and adolescents eat healthier foods and be more active. More than 23.5 million children and adolescents in the United States—nearly one in three young people nationally and 42 percent in Stockton – are overweight or obese. Obesity puts children at risk for a number of serious health problems, including high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes and some forms of cancer. Some research indicates that, because of obesity, the current generation of young people could be the first in the nation’s history to live sicker and die younger than their parents’ generation. RWJF is the nation’s largest philanthropy dedicated solely to improving health and health care. AHA is the nation’s oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting cardiovascular disease. “Some cities and states are starting to see progress in their efforts to reverse the childhood obesity epidemic,” said Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey, RWJF president and CEO. “As a country, we’re gaining a better sense of what changes work, and now it’s time to make those changes in every community. I’m confident this new collaboration with the American Heart Association will help us do just that.” Under the new initiative, RWJF and AHA will focus on policy interventions to advance six priorities that research shows are likely to have the greatest impact on childhood obesity. AHA will develop the overarching strategy that knits together efforts across all six priorities and fund efforts for three of them:

  • improving the nutritional quality of snack foods and beverages in schools;
  • reducing consumption of sugary beverages; and
  • protecting children from unhealthy food and beverage marketing.

RWJF will fund efforts to address the following priorities in underserved communities:

  • increasing access to affordable healthy foods;
  • increasing access to parks, playgrounds, walking paths, bike lanes and other opportunities to be physically active; and
  • helping schools and youth-serving programs increase children’s physical activity levels.

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    Joe Goldeen

    Joe Goldeen has been with The Record since 1990. He is an award-winning journalist and member of the California Endowment Health Journalism Fellowship. He is a native of Northern California with a bachelors degree in political economy from the ... Read Full
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