Joe’s Health Calendar July 3

COMMUNITY EVENTS

Go Lean With Protein in Manteca

July 7 (Tuesday) 4 to 5 p.m.: San Joaquin County Public Health Services is offering free nutrition classes at Manteca Public Library, 320 W. Center St., Manteca. Each week a different topic will be covered, but participants can join at any time and no registration is required. Classes are open to the public and will include free healthy tools and food tastings. You will learn to: prepare new healthy recipes; make your food dollars count; understand food labels; eat more fruits and vegetables; build strong bones; and increase physical activity. Free cookbooks and take-home items. Information: (209) 468-3821. Funded by USDA SNAP-Ed, an equal opportunity provider and employer

Build Strong Bones in East Stockton

July 10 (Friday) noon to 1 p.m.: San Joaquin County Public Health Services is offering free nutrition classes at Health Net Community Center, 678 N. Wilson Way, Suite 16 (Eastland Plaza), Stockton. Each week a different topic will be covered, but participants can join at any time and no registration is required. Classes are open to the public and will include free healthy tools and food tastings. You will learn to: prepare new healthy recipes; make your food dollars count; understand food labels; eat more fruits and vegetables; build strong bones; and increase physical activity. Free cookbooks and take-home items. Information: (209) 468-3821. Funded by USDA SNAP-Ed, an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Make a Change in Manteca

July 14 (Tuesday) 4 to 5 p.m.: San Joaquin County Public Health Services is offering free nutrition classes at Manteca Public Library, 320 W. Center St., Manteca. Each week a different topic will be covered, but participants can join at any time and no registration is required. Classes are open to the public and will include free healthy tools and food tastings. You will learn to: prepare new healthy recipes; make your food dollars count; understand food labels; eat more fruits and vegetables; build strong bones; and increase physical activity. Free cookbooks and take-home items. Information: (209) 468-3821. Funded by USDA SNAP-Ed, an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Go Lean With Protein in East Stockton

July 17 (Friday) noon to 1 p.m.: San Joaquin County Public Health Services is offering free nutrition classes at Health Net Community Center, 678 N. Wilson Way, Suite 16 (Eastland Plaza), Stockton. Each week a different topic will be covered, but participants can join at any time and no registration is required. Classes are open to the public and will include free healthy tools and food tastings. You will learn to: prepare new healthy recipes; make your food dollars count; understand food labels; eat more fruits and vegetables; build strong bones; and increase physical activity. Free cookbooks and take-home items. Information: (209) 468-3821. Funded by USDA SNAP-Ed, an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Healthy Eating Active Living Quarterly Meeting

July 21 (Tuesday) 9 a.m. to noon: This quarter’s meeting at South Sacramento Christian Center, 7710 Stockton Blvd., Sacramento, will explore the Smarter Lunchrooms Movement and the EatFresh.org Resource. Please join us as we share best practices, exchange information and explore mutual interventions and cooperative efforts to provide nutrition and obesity prevention services. Participation is open to anyone interested in working collaboratively to improve the health of communities within the Delta and Gold Country Region of California. Registration is encouraged. CLICK HERE, For more information, please contact Lara Falkenstein.

Celebrate – Eat Smart in Manteca

July 21 (Tuesday) 4 to 5 p.m.: San Joaquin County Public Health Services is offering free nutrition classes at Manteca Public Library, 320 W. Center St., Manteca. Each week a different topic will be covered, but participants can join at any time and no registration is required. Classes are open to the public and will include free healthy tools and food tastings. You will learn to: prepare new healthy recipes; make your food dollars count; understand food labels; eat more fruits and vegetables; build strong bones; and increase physical activity. Free cookbooks and take-home items. Information: (209) 468-3821. Funded by USDA SNAP-Ed, an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Make a Change in East Stockton

July 24 (Friday) noon to 1 p.m.: San Joaquin County Public Health Services is offering free nutrition classes at Health Net Community Center, 678 N. Wilson Way, Suite 16 (Eastland Plaza), Stockton. Each week a different topic will be covered, but participants can join at any time and no registration is required. Classes are open to the public and will include free healthy tools and food tastings. You will learn to: prepare new healthy recipes; make your food dollars count; understand food labels; eat more fruits and vegetables; build strong bones; and increase physical activity. Free cookbooks and take-home items. Information: (209) 468-3821. Funded by USDA SNAP-Ed, an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Celebrate – Eat Smart in East Stockton

July 31 (Friday) noon to 1 p.m.: San Joaquin County Public Health Services is offering free nutrition classes at Health Net Community Center, 678 N. Wilson Way, Suite 16 (Eastland Plaza), Stockton. Each week a different topic will be covered, but participants can join at any time and no registration is required. Classes are open to the public and will include free healthy tools and food tastings. You will learn to: prepare new healthy recipes; make your food dollars count; understand food labels; eat more fruits and vegetables; build strong bones; and increase physical activity. Free cookbooks and take-home items. Information: (209) 468-3821. Funded by USDA SNAP-Ed, an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Free Health & Vision Fair in Stockton

Sept. 18 (Friday) 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.: The eighth annual Health & Vision Fair sponsored by the Community Center for the Blind, 130 W. Flora St., Stockton, will offer free vision screenings, hearing evaluations, blood pressure checks, goodies and giveaways. Bring your family. Many of Stockton’s resources and agencies will be represented. The Lions’ Eye Mobile will be on site. Information: (209) 466-3836.

Celebration on Central (Lodi) for Bi-National Health Week

Sept. 27 (Sunday) 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.: Up to 60 agencies will be providing information, free health screenings, arts and crafts activities, face painting, amusing clowns, free food, live entertainment, raffle prizes and agencies interacting with children and families at the Celebration on Central at Joe Serna Jr. Charter School, 29 S. Central Ave., Lodi.

Free Multicultural Health and Community Fair in Stockton

Oct. 10 (Saturday) 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.: West Lane Oaks Family Resource Center, part of the Community Partnership for Families of San Joaquin County, is planning its eighth Annual Multicultural Health and Community Fair at the Normandy Village Shopping Center, northeast corner of Hammer and West lanes, Stockton, in the parking lot adjacent to Carl’s Jr. We hope that you can join us this year and help to make our event a success. The goal of the Multicultural Health and Community Fair is to educate the community on where and how to find resources and programs through the various agencies in attendance and to celebrate our cultural diversity. Over 50 agencies participated at last year’s event. These agencies, such as social service agencies, health providers and financial planning, provided free services and assisted families with their various needs. We also provided activities for children. Over 600 families attended our event last year, and this year we hope to attract more than 1,000 families. Information: (209) 644-8619.

Celebrate Care Givers With an Inner Safari

Nov. 14 (Saturday) 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.: Healings in Motion presents its annual day to honor and recognize care givers: An Inner Safari – A Joyful Day to Relax, Retool and Renew. Event will be held at Robert Cabral Agricultural Center, 2101 E. Earhart Drive, Stockton. Information and registration: Click here.

CareVan Offers Free Mobile Health Clinic

St. Joseph’s Medical Center CareVan offers a free health clinic for low-income and no-insurance individuals or families, 16 years old and older. Mobile health care services will be available to handle most minor urgent health care needs such as mild burns, bumps, abrasions, sprains, sinus and urinary tract infections, cold and flu. No narcotics prescriptions will be available. Information: (209) 461-3471 or www.StJosephsCares.org/CarevanClinic schedule is subject to change without notice. Walk-In appointments are available.

  • Tuesdays 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.: Dollar General, 310 W. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., Stockton.
  • Wednesdays & Thursdays 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.: For those 16 and older only; San Joaquin County Fairgrounds, 1658 S. Airport Way, Stockton.

ER Wait Watcher: Which ER Will See You the Fastest?

Heading to the emergency room? ProPublica provides a great tool to help. You may wait a while before a doctor or other treating professional sees you — and the hospital nearest to you might not be the one that sees you the fastest. Click here to look up average ER wait times, as reported by hospitals to the federal government, as well as the time it takes to get there in current traffic, as reported by Google.

Farmers Markets In San Joaquin County

San Joaquin County Public Health Services Network for a Healthy California program has developed a list of San Joaquin County Farmers Markets as part of its goal to increase fruit and vegetable consumption. Click here for the latest list of farmers markets around San Joaquin County, including times and locations.

NEWS

Need Help in San Joaquin County? Call 2-1-1

Have no money for food? Just lost your job? Sick and need a health clinic? Depressed? How do I file taxes? Call 2-1-1 for help. Click here for the flier.

AMA Strengthens Youth Policy on E-Cigarettes

With the growing popularity of electronic cigarettes among the nation’s youth, the American Medical Association (AMA) adopted new policy to further strengthen its support of regulatory oversight of electronic cigarettes. The policy calls for the passage of laws and regulations that would: set the minimum legal purchase age for electronic cigarettes and their liquid nicotine refills at 21 years old; require liquid nicotine to be packaged in child-resistant containers; and urge strict enforcement of laws prohibiting the sale of tobacco products to minors. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s 2014 National Youth Tobacco Survey, e-cigarette use among middle and high school students tripled from 2013 to 2014. The survey data showed e-cigarette use among high school students increased from 4.5 percent in 2013 to 13.4 percent in 2014 – an increase from approximately 660,000 to 2 million students. Among middle school students, the data indicated that e-cigarette use more than tripled from 1.1 percent in 2013 to 3.9 percent in 2014 – an increase from approximately 120,000 to 450,000 students. “The AMA continues to advocate for more stringent policies to protect our country’s youth from the dangers of tobacco use and improve public health. The AMA’s newest policy expands on the AMA’s longtime efforts to help keep all tobacco products, including electronic cigarettes, out of the hands of young people, by urging laws to deter the sale of electronic cigarettes to anyone under the age of 21,” AMA President Dr. Robert Wah said. “We also urge the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to act now to implement its proposed rule to effectively regulate electronic cigarettes.” The new policy extends existing AMA policy adopted in 2013 and 2014 calling for all electronic cigarettes to be subject to the same regulations and oversight that the FDA applies to tobacco and nicotine products, seeking tighter marketing restrictions on manufacturers, and prohibiting claims that electronic cigarettes are effective tobacco cessation tools. “Improving the health of the nation is AMA’s top priority and we will continue to advocate for policies that help reduce the burden of preventable diseases like cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes, both of which can be linked to smoking,” Wah said.

Valley Children’s, Stanford Partner on Pediatric Programs

Valley Children’s Healthcare of Madera and Stanford University School of Medicine will partner to create a graduate medical education program based at Valley Children’s Hospital. “Valley Children’s is taking the lead in training the next generation of pediatricians and pediatric surgical and medical specialists,” said Dr. David Christensen, Valley Children’s chief medical officer. “With Stanford as our academic partner, we’ll prepare doctors to continue providing the highest quality medical care for children.” The “Valley Children’s Pediatric Residency Program, Affiliated with Stanford University School of Medicine” will allow Valley Children’s residents to have rotations and learning opportunities at the Palo Alto campus and for Stanford’s residents to learn here. The fellowship program at Valley Children’s will be the first of its kind in the Valley. It will train doctors to become pediatric subspecialists, building on the highest quality of exceptional care in service lines like pediatric surgery, gastroenterology and emergency medicine. “We are excited about the opportunity to partner with Valley Children’s in the creation of a new, pediatric-focused teaching program in Central California and for our current residents and fellows to rotate at Valley Children’s,” said Dr. Lloyd Minor, dean of the Stanford University School of Medicine. “Valley Children’s is one of the largest children’s hospitals in California and has the state’s busiest emergency department for patients younger than 21 years of age. By spending time there, our residents will have the opportunity to see a wide variety of complex and critically ill patients in a short period of time.” A unique aspect of the Pediatric Residency and Fellowship programs will be Valley Children’s partnership with hospitals and medical groups throughout the area. Valley Children’s residents and fellows will have the opportunity for rotations at partner locations – including Kaiser Permanente and Saint Agnes Medical Center in Fresno and Dignity Health – and local pediatricians’ offices. “These relationships are key to the success of our program,” said Valley Children’s President and CEO Todd Suntrapak. “One of our goals is to attract pediatricians and subspecialists to our area and keep them here. That means more Valley families will have access to the care they need, right where they live. One of the best ways we can do this is by exposing our residents and fellows to the diverse practice opportunities that exist in the Central Valley. We are grateful that so many groups are committed to helping Valley Children’s train the next generation of pediatricians and pediatric specialists.” Leading the new program is Valley Children’s Chief of Pediatrics Dr. Jolie Limon. Limon joined Valley Children’s as a pediatric hospitalist in 2000. She has won numerous teaching awards during her tenure and her areas of expertise include resident leadership and interprofessional education. “This is an exciting time,” Limon said. “I look forward to building a program that not only trains exceptional pediatricians but also creates future leaders in pediatric care for the Valley. Valley Children’s Hospital has a wealth of wonderful clinicians, educators and patients by which to sustain an amazing training program.” Valley Children’s Hospital will continue to serve as a teaching site for more than 190 residents and medical students in a dozen other programs, including those based at Kaweah Delta Health Care District in Visalia, Mercy Medical Center in Merced and Clinica Sierra Vista in Fresno.

California Endowment Unveils New Website

The California Endowment, the state’s largest health foundation, today unveiled its new website – designed to bring more tools and features to its users, and allowing The Endowment to better connect with its many partner organizations, as well as thought leaders and the people of California. “Our new site is an important engine to support The Endowment’s work to transform communities across California, and improve the fundamental health status of all Californians,” said Dr. Robert Ross, M.D., chief executive officer. “The site’s new features allow us to reach more people and ultimately help realize more change throughout California.” The website offers a fresh design and fully integrates with today’s digital environment. It’s mobile friendly and easily accessible with new tools, interactive graphics, timely information and links to The Endowment’s social media platforms. Please visit the site at www.calendow.org.

Top Chronic Conditions: 11 Million and Counting

 SEE THE REPORT

GET THE CHARTS

Chronic conditions are the leading cause of death and disability in the United States, and the biggest contributor to health care costs. But there is wide variation in their incidence, with major differences depending on age, income, race and ethnicity, and insurance status. In addition, many Californians with chronic conditions are delaying needed care because of cost. Californians with the Top Chronic Conditions: 11 Million and Counting looks at five major chronic conditions — asthma, diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure, and serious psychological distress — and how each of these affects Californians. Among the key findings:

  • About 40% of adults reported having at least one of the five chronic conditions studied.
  • High blood pressure is the most common chronic condition, affecting about one in four, or 7.6 million, adults in California.
  • As income rises, the prevalence of chronic conditions falls. Adults living under 138% of the federal poverty level were more likely to have two or more chronic conditions (14%) than those in the highest income group, 400%+ of the federal poverty level (8%).
  • Of Californians with psychological distress, 34% delayed needed medical care, and 27% delayed filling prescriptions. Cost or lack of insurance was frequently cited as the reason for these delays.
  • Of Californians age 65 or older, 70% have at least one chronic condition, compared to 26% of those age 18 to 39.

See the complete report and charts now.

This report is published as part of the CHCF California Health Care Almanac, an online clearinghouse for key data and analysis examining California’s health care marketplace. Find all Almanac reports at www.chcf.org/almanac.

Resources to Help You Better Understand Stem Cell Science

The International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) has launched an expanded “Closer Look at Stem Cells” website www.closerlookatstemcells.org , an online resource to help patients and their families make informed decisions about stem cell treatments, clinics and their health. The ISSCR, a global membership-based organization comprised of approximately 4,000 stem cell researchers, clinicians and ethicists, is concerned that stem cell treatments are being marketed by clinics around the world without appropriate oversight and patient protections in place to ensure safety and likely benefit. New resources on the website emphasize key scientific principles and practices that will help the public to better evaluate treatment claims. “The ‘Closer Look at Stem Cells’ website is a direct channel from researchers to the public,” said Megan Munsie, a scientist with Stem Cells Australia and chairperson of the ISSCR task force responsible for the website expansion. “Promising clinical trials are under way for many diseases and conditions, but most stem cell-based treatments are still in the future. We hope that the website will foster interest and excitement in the science, but also an understanding of the current limitations of stem cells as medicine and a healthy skepticism of clinics selling treatments.” The website, once patient focused, is now a comprehensive destination for those interested in stem cell science and research being conducted across the globe. It includes informational pages on basic stem cell biology, the process by which science becomes medicine, clinical trials and the use of stem cells in understanding specific health conditions – macular degeneration, multiple sclerosis, heart disease and diabetes. Pages on other conditions will be added in the coming months. It is also home to the “Stem Cells in Focus” blog, which seeks to make cutting-edge research from the stem cell field accessible to non-scientists. “I am often contacted by patients struggling with very difficult decisions about their health, and who want to know more about the potential of stem cells,” said Larry Goldstein, a stem cell scientist at the University of California, San Diego and a member of the ISSCR task force responsible for the website expansion. “My experience is that understanding the current state of stem cell science and medicine is key to making informed decisions about stem cell treatments, and so I encourage patients to start their journey on the ‘Closer Look at Stem Cells’ website.”

California Debuts Ads to Counter E-Cigarettes

Twenty-five years after launching the first anti-smoking advertisements in the state, the California Department of Public Health on March 23 premiered a series of television, digital, and outdoor ads in a new campaign called “Wake Up,” as part of its educational effort to inform the public about the dangers of e-cigarettes. “California has been a world leader in tobacco use prevention and cessation since 1990, with one of the lowest youth and adult smoking rates in the nation. The aggressive marketing and escalating use of e-cigarettes threatens to erode that progress,” said Dr. Karen Smith, newly appointed CDPH director and state health officer. CDPH recently released a report and health advisory highlighting areas of concern regarding e-cigarettes, including the sharp rise in e-cigarette use among California teens and young adults, the highly addictive nature of nicotine in e-cigarettes, the surge in accidental nicotine poisonings occurring in young children, and that secondhand e-cigarette emissions contain several toxic chemicals. Research shows that youth and young adults who use e-cigarettes are far more likely to also use traditional cigarettes and other tobacco products. “Our advertising campaign is telling the public to ‘wake up’ to the fact that these are highly addictive products being mass marketed,” said Dr. Smith. The advertising campaign includes two television ads that feature songs from the 1950s and ‘60s and images portraying the health risks of e-cigarettes. One TV ad underscores the e-cigarette industry’s use of candy flavored ‘e-juice’ and products that entice the next generation to become addicted to nicotine. The second TV spot emphasizes the dangers and addictiveness of e-cigarettes, while exposing the fact that big tobacco companies are in the e-cigarette business. E-cigarettes are largely unregulated at the federal level and companies are not required to disclose what is in their products or how they are made. To inform the public about the dangers of e-cigarettes, CDPH launched an educational campaign in late January. The advertising component kicked off on March 23 and runs through June 2015, with TV and digital ads on websites, online radio and social media throughout the state. Outdoor ads, including billboards, at gas stations and in malls, and ads in movie theaters will be phased in throughout the campaign. This counter e-cigarette advertising campaign is part of CDPH’s ongoing anti- tobacco media efforts. In addition to the advertising, the CDPH educational campaign will include:

  • Partnering with the local public health, medical, and child care organizations to increase awareness about the known toxicity of e-cigarettes and the high risk of poisonings, especially to children, while continuing to promote and support the use of proven effective cessation therapies.
  • Joining with the California Department of Education and school officials to assist in providing accurate information to parents, students, teachers, and school administrators on the dangers of e-cigarettes.

The California Tobacco Control Program was established by the Tobacco Tax and Health Protection Act of 1988. The act, approved by California voters, instituted a 25-cent tax on each pack of cigarettes and earmarked 5 cents of that tax to fund California’s tobacco control efforts. These efforts include supporting local health departments and community organizations, a media campaign, and evaluation and surveillance. California’s comprehensive approach has changed social norms around tobacco use and secondhand smoke. California’s tobacco control efforts have reduced both adult and youth smoking rates by 50 percent, saved more than 1 million lives and have resulted in $134 billion worth of savings in health care costs. Learn more at TobaccoFreeCA.com.

Manteca Unified Students Learn Hands-Only CPR

Knowing the importance of quick action upon a person experiencing sudden cardiac arrest, the hands-only CPR push was created by Manteca Unified School District Health Services’ Caroline Thibodeau and Secondary Education’s Tevani Liotard along with Manteca District Ambulance Service’s Jonathan Mendoza. Other agencies who take part are Manteca Fire Department, Lathrop-Manteca Fire Department and Stockton Fire Department. The group has presented a hands-Only CPR lecture and hands-on demonstration to all MUSD ninth-grade students. The lecture and presentation has been used throughout the MUSD high schools over the past 16 months. A total of 2,794 students and 73 adults have been taught the hands-only CPR to date. By the end of the school year, the number will increase to more than 3,500 students. All students get to experience hands-on by doing chest compression on a mannequin plus hearing and seeing the importance of quickly starting hands- only CPR quickly till help arrives. Paramedics, firefighters and teachers assist the students during the mannequin chest compression portion.  a majority of the students say, “Doing chest compressions is harder than I thought, but, I now feel I can do it or tell someone how to do it.” In December, a student at Manteca High School collapsed in the middle of class experiencing a sudden cardiac arrest.  Due to the quick action of the vice principal, Manteca Police Department resource officer, Manteca District Ambulance EMTs and paramedics, Manteca firefighters and continuous care at St. Joseph’s Medical Center and Stanford Hospital, this student is alive and has fully recovered.

Comprehensive Website Aims to Reduce Health Disparities

Welltopia, a new website launched by the California Department of Health Care Services and the UC Davis Institute for Population Health Improvement, offers a wide range of essential resources to help Californians, especially those on limited incomes, build healthier lives and communities. Designed to complement the popularWelltopia by DHCS Facebook page, the new website at MyWelltopia.com serves as a comprehensive resource connecting individuals, families and communities to credible information that addresses the social determinants of health and other leading causes of preventable death. Many studies have shown that access to health care, education, employment, housing, nutritious foods and physical activity are among the fundamental drivers of health for individuals and their communities. Making reliable information and resources available for people of all ages is key to creating healthy environments. “We developed Welltopia to be a convenient and trusted source of information covering all three aspects of health — physical, mental and well-being,” said Neal Kohatsu, DHCS medical director. “We’ve made every effort to ensure that the resources are both accurate and accessible to consumers.” The Welltopia site organizes information into five categories — Well Body, Well Mind, Jobs & Training, Health Insurance, and Basic Needs. It includes information on nutrition, physical activity, smoking cessation, alcohol- and drug-abuse prevention, stress management, health insurance, residency and social services, among others. The site also contains videos, photos and graphics with information about health-related programs. There are free applications, such as fitness trackers, women’s health information, recipes and food journals to track daily calorie intake, and links to CalFresh, education, job placement resources and other social services. “Welltopia should be the first stop for persons seeking reliable information about the many determinants of health,” said Kenneth Kizer, IPHI director. “Its friendly format quickly guides users to practical and trustworthy sources.” The Department of Health Care Services manages California’s form of Medicaid, known as Medi-Cal, which helps millions of low-income Californians obtain access to affordable, high-quality health care, including medical, dental, mental health, substance use disorder services, and long-term services and supports. DHCS aims to preserve and improve the health of all Californians. The UC Davis Institute for Population Health Improvement fosters population health within the UC Davis Health System and communities throughout the state. IPHI’s mission is to create, apply and disseminate knowledge about the many determinants of health to improve health and health security, and to support activities that improve health equity and eliminate health disparities.

Protect Your Family From E-Cigarettes

Read some facts from the California Department of Public Health. To learn more, click here.

HICAP Seeking Volunteers to Counsel Seniors on Medicare

HICAP – the Health Insurance Counseling and Advocacy Program – is a nonprofit organization dedicated to helping Medicare beneficiaries navigate the Medicare maze.  We do this in one-on-one counseling sessions, with registered HICAP volunteer counselors. HICAP counselors help Medicare beneficiaries: understand Medicare; compare supplemental policies; review HMO and PPO benefits; learn about government assistance programs; prepare appeals and challenge denials, and clarify rights as a health care consumer.  Our services are always free and always unbiased.  We neither sell nor recommend specific insurance companies.  Rather, we educate beneficiaries to make the choice best for their needs. We are looking for energetic seniors who are computer-savvy, interested in learning, and good communicators.  We will conduct training in San Joaquin County soon.  If you are interested in learning more about HICAP volunteering, contact HICAP at (209) 470-7812.

Breastfeeding and Working

The Breastfeeding Coalition of San Joaquin County offers its “Working & Breastfeeding” Toolkit at BreastfeedSJC.org. This toolkit contains tips, answers to frequently asked questions and links to online resources for families and employers. Jump on over to BreastfeedSJC.org/Working-and-Breastfeeding to check it out.

Diabetes Resources in San Joaquin County

Diabetes is a costly disease, both in terms of people’s health and well-being, and in terms of dollars spent on treatment, medications and lost days at work and school. San Joaquin County annually accounts for among the worst death rates from diabetes among all 58 California counties. In an attempt to make its estimated 60,000 residents with diabetes aware of the many local resources available to help them deal with the disease, a dozen billboards in English and Spanish have been posted around the county directing readers to the UniteForDiabetesSJC.org website. At that website is information on numerous free classes and programs that provide education and training on preventing diabetes, managing the disease, controlling its side effects, and links to more resources, including special events and finding a physician. For questions on how to navigate the website or find a class, residents may call Vanessa Armendariz, community project manager at the San Joaquin Medical Society, at(209) 952-5299. The billboards came about through the efforts of the Diabetes Work Group, a subcommittee of San Joaquin County Public Health’s Obesity and Chronic Disease Prevention Task Force. Funding was provided through a grant from Kaiser Permanente Community Benefit Programs Division-Central Valley Area.

Senior Gateway Website: Don’t Be a Victim

California Insurance Commissioner Dave Jones has unveiled a new consumer protection tool for California seniors, who have traditionally been prime targets for con artists. The California Department of Insurance (CDI) is hosting a new Web site www.seniors.ca.gov to educate seniors and their advocates and provide helpful information about how to avoid becoming victims of personal or financial abuse. The Web site, called Senior Gateway, is important because seniors, including older veterans, are disproportionately at risk of being preyed upon financially and subjected to neglect and abuse. The Senior Gateway is sponsored by the Elder Financial Abuse Interagency Roundtable (E-FAIR), convened by CDI and includes representatives from many California agencies who share a common purpose of safeguarding the welfare of California’s seniors. “The goal of this collaborative effort is to assemble, in one convenient location, valuable information not only for seniors, but their families and caregivers. This site will help California seniors find resources and solve problems, and will enable participating agencies to better serve this important segment of our population,” Jones said. The site offers seniors valuable tips and resources in the following areas, and more:

  • Avoiding and reporting abuse and neglect by in-home caregivers or in facilities; learn about different types of abuse and the warning signs.
  • Preventing and reporting financial fraud, abuse and scams targeting seniors.
  • Understanding health care, insurance, Medicare and long-term care; know what long-term care includes.
  • Locating services and programs available to assist older adults.
  • Knowing your rights before buying insurance; what seniors need to know about annuities.
  • Investing wisely and understanding the ins and outs of reverse mortgages.

$5,000 Grants Help Pay for Children’s Medical Expenses

UnitedHealthcare Children’s Foundation (UHCCF) is seeking grant applications from families in need of financial assistance to help pay for their child’s health care treatments, services or equipment not covered, or not fully covered, by their commercial health insurance plan. Qualifying families can receive up to $5,000 to help pay for medical services and equipment such as physical, occupational and speech therapy, counseling services, surgeries, prescriptions, wheelchairs, orthotics, eyeglasses and hearing aids. To be eligible for a grant, children must be 16 years of age or younger. Families must meet economic guidelines, reside in the United States and have a commercial health insurance plan. Grants are available for medical expenses families have incurred 60 days prior to the date of application as well as for ongoing and future medical needs. Parents or legal guardians may apply for grants at www.uhccf.org, and there is no application deadline. Organizations or private donors can make tax-deductible donations to the foundation at this website. In 2011, UHCCF awarded more than 1,200 grants to families across the United States for treatments associated with medical conditions such as cancer, spina bifida, muscular dystrophy, diabetes, hearing loss, autism, cystic fibrosis, Down syndrome, ADHD and cerebral palsy.

Facts About Fruits and Vegetables

Click here for lots of great information about fruits and vegetables.

ONGOING

Cambodian and Hmong Language Diabetes Classes

The Cambodian and Hmong communities of Stockton are invited to attend free diabetes classes presented in the Khmer and Hmong languages. Call Jou Moua at (209) 298-2374 or (209) 461-3224 to find a class.

Fit Families for Life

Fit Families for Life is a weekly class for parents offered by HealthNet and held at Fathers and Families of San Joaquin, 338 E. Market St., Stockton. All parents are welcome and there is no cost to attend. Participants will learn about nutrition, cooking and exercise. Information and registration: Renee Garcia at (209) 941-0701.

Journey to Control Diabetes Education Program

Mondays 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.: Dameron Hospital offers a free diabetes education program, with classes held in the Dameron Hospital Annex, 445 W. Acacia St., Stockton. Preregistration is required. Contact Carolyn Sanders, RN, at c.sanders@dameronhospital.org(209) 461-3136 or (209) 461-7597.

Al-Anon Freedom to Change Support Group

Mondays and Thursdays 7 to 8:30 p.m.: Lodi Health offers Al-Anon Freedom to Change meetings for family and friends of problem drinkers. The group helps people to know what to do when someone close to them drinks too much. Meetings are offered several times each month at Lodi Memorial Hospital, 975 S. Fairmont Ave., Lodi. Information: www.lodihealth.org.

Man-to-Man Prostate Cancer Support Group

First Monday of Month 7 to 9 p.m.: Dameron Hospital, 525 W. Acacia St., Stockton, holds a support group for men diagnosed with prostate cancer and their families and caregivers. The meetings are facilitated by trained volunteers who are prostate cancer survivors. Information: Ernest Pontiflet at (209) 952-9092.

Crystal Meth Anonymous Recovery Group

Mondays 6:30 p.m.: 825 Central Ave., Lodi. Information: (209) 430-9780 or (209) 368-0756.

Yoga for People Dealing with Cancer

Mondays 5:30 to 7 p.m.: This free weekly Yoga & Breathing class for cancer patients will help individuals sleep better and reduce pain. This class is led by yoga instructor Chinu Mehdi in Classrooms 1 and 2, St. Joseph’s Medical Center, 1800 N. California St., Stockton. Information: (209) 467-6550 orSJCancerInfo@dignityhealth.org.

Respiratory Support Group for Better Breathing

First Tuesday of month 10 to 11 a.m.: Lodi Health’s Respiratory Therapy Department and the American Lung Association of California Valley Lode offer a free “Better Breathers’” respiratory-support group for people and their family members with breathing problems including asthma, bronchitis and emphysema. Participants will learn how to cope with chronic lung disease, understand lungs and how they work and use medications and oxygen properly. The group meets at Lodi Health West, 800 S. Lower Sacramento Road, Lodi. Pre-registration is recommended by calling (209) 339-7445. For information on other classes available at Lodi Memorial, visit its website at www.lodihealth.org.

The Beat Goes On Cardiac Support Group

First Tuesday of month 11 a.m. to noon: Lodi Health offers a free cardiac support group at Lodi Health West, 800 S. Lower Sacramento Road, Lodi. “The Beat Goes On” cardiac support group is a community-based nonprofit group that offers practical tools for healthy living to heart disease patients, their families and caregivers. Its mission is to provide community awareness that those with heart disease can live well through support meetings and educational forums. Upcoming topics include exercise, stress management and nutrition counseling services. All are welcomed to attend. Information: (209) 339-7664.

Planned Childbirth Services

Tuesdays 6 to 8 p.m.: Dameron Hospital, 525 W. Acacia St., Stockton, hosts a four-class series which answers questions and prepares mom and her partner for labor and birth. Bring two pillows and a comfortable blanket or exercise mat to each class. These classes are requested during expecting mother’s third trimester. Information/registration: Carolyn Sanders, RN (209) 461-3136 or www.Dameronhospital.org.

Lactation Support Group in Lodi

Tuesdays 10 a.m.: Lodi Health offers The Lactation Club, a support group for breastfeeding moms that is held in Classroom A at Lodi Memorial Hospital, 975 S. Fairmont Ave., Lodi. Lactation consultants are readily available to answer questions and help with breastfeeding issues. A scale will also be on hand to weigh babies. Information: (209) 339.7872 or www.lodihealth.org.

Say Yes to Breastfeeding

Tuesdays 6 to 8 p.m.: Dameron Hospital, 525 W. Acacia St., Stockton, offers a class that outlines the information and basic benefits and risk management of breastfeeding. Topics include latching, early skin-to-skin on cue, expressing milk and helpful hints on early infant feeding. In addition, the hospital offers a monthly Mommy and Me-Breastfeeding support group where mothers, babies and hospital clerical staff meet the second Monday of each month. Information/registration: Carolyn Sanders, RN (209) 461-3136 or www.Dameronhospital.org.

Precious Preemies

Second Tuesday of the month, 9:30 to 10:30 a.m.: Precious Preemies: A Discussion Group for Families Raising Premature Infants and Infants with Medical Concerns required registration and is held at Family Resource Network, Sherwood Executive Center, 5250 Claremont Ave., Suite 148, Stockton. Information: www.frcn.org/calendar.asp or (209) 472-3674 or (800) 847-3030.

Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous

Are you having trouble controlling the way you eat? Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous (FA) is a free Twelve Step recovery program for anyone suffering from food obsession, overeating, undereating or bulimia. For more information or a list of additional meetings throughout the U.S. and the world, call (781) 932-6300 or visitwww.foodaddicts.org.

  • Tuesdays 7 p.m.: Modesto Unity Church, 2547 Veneman Ave., Modesto.
  • Wednesdays 9 a.m.: The Episcopal Church of Saint Anne, 1020 W. Lincoln Road, Stockton.
  • Saturdays 9 a.m.: Tracy Community Church, 1790 Sequoia Blvd. at Corral Hollow, Tracy.

Diabetes: Basics to a Healthy Life

Wednesdays 10 a.m.: Free eight-class ongoing series every Wednesday except the month of September. Click here for detailsSt. Joseph’s Medical Center, Cleveland Classroom, 2102 N. California St., Stockton. Information: (209) 944-8355 or www.StJosephsCares.org/Diabetes.

Break From Stress

Wednesdays 6 to 7 p.m.: St. Joseph’s Medical Center offers the community a break from their stressful lives with Break from Stress sessions. These sessions are free, open to the public, with no pre-registration necessary. Just drop in, take a deep breath and relax through a variety of techniques. Break from Stress sessions are held in St. Joseph’s Cleveland Classroom (behind HealthCare Clinical Lab on California Street just north of the medical center. Information: SJCancerInfo@DignityHealth.org or (209) 467-6550.

Mother-Baby Breast Connection

Wednesdays 1 to 3 p.m.: Join a lactation consultant for support and advice on the challenges of early breastfeeding. Come meet other families and attend as often as you like. A different topic of interest will be offered each week with time for breastfeeding assistance and questions. Pre-registration is required. Call (209) 467-6331. St. Joseph’s Medical Center, Pavilion Conference Room (1st floor), 1800 N. California St., Stockton.

Adult Children With Aging Relatives

Second Wednesday of month 4:30 p.m.: Lodi Health offers an Adult Children with Aging Relatives support group at the Hutchins Street Square Senior Center. Information: (209) 369-4443 or (209) 369-6921.

Diabetes Support Group in Stockton

Third Wednesday of month 5:30 to 7 p.m.: This support group will help you deal with issues of diabetes through avoiding lifelong complications. Accomplished by increasing daily activities, learning to take your medications  properly, and overcoming depression, frustration and feeling alone. Each month there will be resources including dietitians, doctors, pharmacists and literature is available to assist you. Knowledge is power. This is a free program (no registration is required). Monthly meetings will be held at St. Joseph’s Medical Center, 1800 N. California St., Stockton, in the basement Classroom 3. Any questions or comments call Susan Sanchez, RN, Certified Diabetes Educator: (209) 662-9487.

Smoking Cessation Class in Lodi

Wednesdays 3 to 4 p.m.: Lodi Health offers an eight-session smoking-cessation class for those wishing to become smoke free. Classes are held weekly in the Lodi Health Pulmonary Rehabilitation Department at Lodi Memorial Hospital, 975 S. Fairmont Ave., Lodi. Topics covered include benefits of quitting; ways to cope with quitting; how to deal with a craving; medications that help with withdrawal; and creating a support system. Call the Lodi Health Lung Health Line at (209) 339-7445 to register.

Individual Stork Tours At Dameron

Wednesdays 5 to 7 p.m.: Dameron Hospital, 525 W. Acacia St., Stockton, offers 30 minute guided tours that provide expecting parents with a tour of Labor/Delivery, the Mother-Baby Unit and an overview of the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. New mothers are provided information on delivery services, where to go and what to do once delivery has arrived, and each mother can create an individual birthing plan. Information/registration: Carolyn Sanders, RN (209) 461-3136or www.Dameronhospital.org.

Brain Builders Weekly Program

Thursdays 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.: Lodi Health and the Hutchins Street Square Senior Center offer “Brain Builders,” a weekly program for people in the early stages of memory loss. There is a weekly fee of $25. Registration is required. Information or to register, call (209) 369-4443 or (209) 369-6921.

Infant CPR and Safety

Second Thursday of month 5 to 7 p.m.: Dameron Hospital, 525 W. Acacia St., Stockton, offers a class to family members to safely take care of their newborn.  Family members are taught infant CPR and relief of choking, safe sleep and car seat safety.  Regarding infant safety, the hospital offers on the fourth Thursday of each month from 5 to 7 p.m. a NICU/SCN family support group. This group is facilitated by a Master Prepared Clinical Social Worker and the Dameron NICU staff with visits from the hospital’s neonatologist. Information/registration: Carolyn Sanders, RN (209) 461-3136 or www.Dameronhospital.org.

Group Meetings for Alzheimer’s Patients, Caregivers

Thursdays 10 to 11:30 a.m.: The Alzheimer’s Aid Society of Northern California in conjunction with Villa Marche residential care facility conducts a simultaneous Caregiver’s Support Group and Patient’s Support Group at Villa Marche, 1119 Rosemarie Lane, Stockton. Caregivers, support people or family members of anyone with dementia are welcome to attend the caregiver’s group, led by Rita Vasquez. It’s a place to listen, learn and share. At the same time, Alzheimer’s and dementia patients can attend the patient’s group led by Sheryl Ashby. Participants will learn more about dementia and how to keep and enjoy the skills that each individual possesses. There will be brain exercises and reminiscence. The meeting is appropriate for anyone who enjoys socialization and is able to attend with moderate supervision. Information: (209) 477-4858.

Clase Gratuita de Diabetes en Español

Cada segundo Viernes del mes: Participantes aprenderán los fundamentos sobre la observación de azúcar de sangre, comida saludable, tamaños de porción y medicaciones. Un educador con certificado del control de diabetes dará instruccion sobre la autodirección durante de esta clase. Para mas información y registración:(209) 944-8355. Aprenda más de los programas de diabetes en el sitio electronico de St. Joseph’s: www.StJosephsCares.org/Diabetes

Nutrition on the Move Class

Fridays 11 a.m. to noon: Nutrition Education Center at Emergency Food Bank, 7 W. Scotts Ave., Stockton.  Free classes are general nutrition classes where you’ll learn about the new My Plate standards, food label reading, nutrition and exercise, eating more fruits and vegetables, and other tips. Information: (209) 464-7369or www.stocktonfoodbank.org.

Crystal Meth Anonymous Recovery Group

Fridays 6 p.m.: St. Joseph’s Behavioral Health (in trailer at the rear of building), 2510 N. California St., Stockton. Information: (209) 461-2000.

Free Diabetes Class in Spanish

Second Friday of every month: Participants will learn the basics about blood sugar monitoring, healthy foods, portion sizes, medications and self-management skills from a certified diabetic educator during this free class. St. Joseph’s Medical Center, 1800 N. California St., Stockton. Information and registration: (209) 944-8355. Learn more on St. Joseph’s diabetes programs at www.StJosephsCares.org/Diabetes.

National Alliance on Mental Health: Family-to-Family Education

Saturdays 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.: NAMI presents a free series of 12 weekly education classes for friends and family of people with major depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder, borderline personality disorder, panic disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, and co-occurring brain disorders. Classes will be held at 530 W. Acacia St., Stockton (across from Dameron Hospital) on the second floor. Information or to register: (209) 468-3755.

Multiple Sclerosis Self-Help Group

Second Saturday of Every Month 10 a.m. to noon: Multiple Sclerosis Self-Help Group meeting are for family, friends, caregivers and individuals with multiple sclerosis. We invite you to join us for a few moments of exchanging ideas and management skills to help you live and work with multiple sclerosis, a chronic disease. Meetings are at St. Joseph’s Medical Center, 1800 N. California St., Stockton, in Classroom 1 in the basement. Information: Laurie (209) 915-1730 or Velma (209) 951-2264.

All Day Prepared Childbirth Class

Third Saturday of month 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.: Dameron Hospital, 525 W. Acacia St., Stockton, offers community service educational class of prebirth education and mentoring. Information/registration: Carolyn Sanders, RN (209) 461-3136 or www.Dameronhospital.org.

Big Brother/Big Sister

Second Sunday of month: Dameron Hospital, 525 W. Acacia St., Stockton, has a one-hour class meeting designed specifically for newborn’s siblings. Topics include family role, a labor/delivery tour and a video presentation which explains hand washing/germ control and other household hygiene activities. This community service class ends with a Certification of Completion certificate. Information/registration: Carolyn Sanders, RN (209) 461-3136 or www.Dameronhospital.org.

Outpatient Program Aimed at Teens

Two programs: Adolescents face a number of challenging issues while trying to master their developmental milestones. Mental health issues (including depression), substance abuse and family issues can hinder them from mastering the developmental milestones that guide them into adulthood. The Adolescent Intensive Outpatient Program (IOP) offered by St. Joseph’s Behavioral Health Center, 2510 N. California St., Stockton, is designed for those individuals who need comprehensive treatment for their mental, emotional or chemical dependency problems. This program uses Dialectical Behavioral Therapy to present skills for effective living. Patients learn how to identify and change distorted thinking, communicate effectively in relationships and regain control of their lives. The therapists work collaboratively with parents, doctors and schools. They also put together a discharge plan so the patient continues to get the help they need to thrive into adulthood.

  • Psychiatric Adolescent IOP meets Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays from 4 to 7:30 p.m.
  • Chemical Recovery Adolescent IOP meets Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays from 4 to 7 p.m.

For more information about this and other groups, (209) 461-2000 and ask to speak with a behavioral evaluator or visit www.StJosephsCanHelp.org.

Stork Tours in Lodi

Parents-to-be are offered individual tours of the Lodi Memorial Hospital Maternity Department, 975 S. Fairmont Ave., Lodi. Prospective parents may view the labor, delivery and recovery areas of the hospital and ask questions of the nursing staff. Phone (209) 339-7879 to schedule a tour. For more information on other classes offered by Lodi Health, visit www.lodihealth.org.

HOSPITALS and MEDICAL GROUPS

Community Medical Centers

Click here for Community Medical Centers (Channel Medical Clinic, San Joaquin Valley Dental Group, etc.) website.

Dameron Hospital Events

Click here for Dameron Hospital’s Event Calendar.

Doctors Hospital of Manteca Events

Click here for Doctors Hospital of Manteca Events finder.

Hill Physicians

Click here for Hill Physicians website.

Kaiser Permanente Central Valley

Click here for Kaiser Central Valley News and Events

Lodi Memorial Hospital

Click here for Lodi Memorial Hospital.

Mark Twain Medical Center

Click here for Mark Twain Medical Center in San Andreas.

Planned Parenthood Mar Monte

Click here to find a Planned Parenthood Health Center near you.

San Joaquin General Hospital

Click here for San Joaquin General Hospital website.

St. Joseph’s Medical Center Classes and Events

Click here for St. Joseph’s Medical Center’s Classes and Events.

Sutter Gould Medical Foundation

Click here for Sutter Gould news. Click here for Sutter Gould calendar of events.

Sutter Tracy Community Hospital Education and Support

Click here for Sutter Tracy Community Hospital events, classes and support groups.

PUBLIC HEALTH

San Joaquin County Public Health Services General Information

Ongoing resources for vaccinations and clinic information are:

  1. Public Health Services Influenza website, www.sjcphs.org
  2. Recorded message line at (209) 469-8200, extension 2# for English and 3# for Spanish.
  3. For further information, individuals may call the following numbers at Public Health Services:
  • For general vaccine and clinic questions, call (209) 468-3862;
  • For medical questions, call (209) 468-3822.

Health officials continue to recommend these precautionary measures to help protect against acquiring influenza viruses:

  1. Wash your hands often with soap and water or use alcohol based sanitizers.
  2. Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue or your sleeve, when you cough or sneeze.
  3. Stay home if you are sick until you are free of a fever for 24 hours.
  4. Get vaccinated.

Public Health Services Clinic Schedules (Adults and Children)

Immunization clinic hours are subject to change depending on volume of patients or staffing. Check the Public Health Services website for additional evening clinics or special clinics at www.sjcphs.org. Clinics with an asterisk (*) require patients to call for an appointment.

Stockton Health Center: 1601 E. Hazelton Ave.; (209) 468-3830.

  • Immunizations: Monday 1-4 p.m.; Tuesday 1-4 p.m.; Wednesday 10 a.m.-1 p.m.; Thursday 8-11 a.m. and 1-4 p.m.; Friday 8-11 a.m.
  • Travel clinic*: Thursday 8-11 a.m. and 1 to 4 p.m.
  • Health exams*: Tuesday 1-4 p.m.; Wednesday 10 a.m.-1 p.m.; Friday 8-11 a.m.
  • Sexually transmitted disease clinic: Wednesday 3-6 p.m. and Friday 1-4 p.m., walk-in and by appointment.
  • Tuberculosis clinic*: Tuesday; second and fourth Wednesday of the month.
  • HIV testing: Tuesday 1-4 p.m.; Thursday 1-4 p.m.

Manteca Health Center: 124 Sycamore Ave.; (209) 823-7104 or (800) 839-4949.

  • Immunizations: Wednesday 10 a.m.-1 p.m. and 3-6 p.m.
  • Tuberculosis clinic*: first and third Wednesday 3-6 p.m.
  • HIV testing: first Wednesday 1:30-4 p.m.

Lodi Health Center: 300 W. Oak St.; (209) 331-7303 or (800) 839-4949.

  • Immunizations: Friday 8-11 a.m. and 1-4 p.m.
  • Tuberculosis clinic*: Friday 8-11 a.m. and 1-4 p.m.
  • HIV testing: second and fourth Friday 1:30-4 p.m.

WIC (Women, Infants & Children) Program

Does your food budget need a boost? The WIC Program can help you stretch your food dollars. This special supplemental food program for women, infants and children serves low-income women who are currently pregnant or have recently delivered, breastfeeding moms, infants, and children up to age 5. Eligible applicants receive monthly checks to use at any authorized grocery store for wholesome foods such as fruits and vegetables, milk and cheese, whole-grain breads and cereals, and more. WIC shows you how to feed your family to make them healthier and brings moms and babies closer together by helping with breastfeeding. WIC offers referrals to low-cost or free health care and other community services depending on your needs. WIC services may be obtained at a variety of locations throughout San Joaquin County:

Stockton (209) 468-3280

  • Public Health Services WIC Main Office, 1145 N. Hunter St.: Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Wednesday 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.; open two Saturdays a month.
  • Family Health Center, 1414 N. California St.: Wednesday 8 a.m. to noon, 1 to 5 p.m.
  • CUFF (Coalition United for Families), 2044 Fair St.: Thursday 8 a.m. to noon, 1 to 5 p.m.
  • Taylor Family Center, 1101 Lever Blvd.: Wednesday 8 a.m. to noon, 1 to 4 p.m.
  • Transcultural Clinic, 4422 N. Pershing Ave. Suite D-5: Tuesday 8 a.m. to noon, 1 to 5 p.m.

Manteca  (209) 823-7104

  • Public Health Services, 124 Sycamore Lane: Tuesday, Thursday, Friday 8 a.m. to noon, 1 to 5 p.m.

Tracy (209) 831-5930

  • Public Health Services, 205 W. Ninth St.: Monday, Wednesday 8 a.m. to noon, 1 to 5 p.m.

Flu Shots in Calaveras County

Fall brings cooler temperatures and the start of the flu season. Getting flu vaccine early offers greater protection throughout flu season. The Calaveras County Public Health Department recommends everyone 6 months of age and older get flu vaccine every year. Flu season can start as early as October and continue through March. “Seasonal flu can be serious,” said Dr. Dean Kelaita, Calaveras County health officer. “Every year people die from the flu.” Some children, youth and adults are at risk of serious illness and possibly death if they are not protected from the flu. They need to get flu vaccine now.

  • Adults 50 years of age and over.
  • Pregnant women.
  • Children and youth 5-18 years on long-term aspirin therapy.
  • Everyone with chronic health conditions (including diabetes, kidney, heart or lung disease).

If you care for an infant less than 6 months or people with chronic health conditions, you can help protect them by getting your flu vaccine. Even if you had a flu vaccination last year, you need another one this year to be protected and to protect others who are at risk. The Public Health Department will offer five community flu clinics:

  • Every Monday (3 to 5:30 p.m.) and Thursday (8 a.m. to noon): Calaveras County Public Health, 700 Mountain Ranch Road, Suite C2, San Andreas. The monthly Valley Springs Immunization Clinic (third Tuesday, 3 to 5:30 pm) will also offer flu vaccine during flu season.

The flu vaccine is $16.  Medicare Part B is accepted.  No one will be denied service due to inability to pay. For more information about the vaccine or the clinics, contact the Public Health Department at (209) 754-6460 or visit the Public Health website at www.calaveraspublichealth.com.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

What You Need to Know About Joe’s Health Calendar

Have a health-oriented event the public in San Joaquin County should know about? Let me know at jgoldeen@recordnet.com and I’ll get it into my Health Calendar. I’m not interested in promoting commercial enterprises here, but I am interested in helping out nonprofit and/or community groups, hospitals, clinics, physicians and other health-care providers. Look for five categories: Community Events, News, Ongoing, Hospitals & Medical Groups, and Public Health. TO THE PUBLIC: I won’t list an item here from a source that I don’t know or trust. So I believe you can count on what you read here. If there is a problem, please don’t hesitate to let me know at (209) 546-8278 or jgoldeen@recordnet.com. Thanks, Joe

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Joe’s Health Calendar July 2

COMMUNITY EVENTS

Go Lean With Protein in Manteca

July 7 (Tuesday) 4 to 5 p.m.: San Joaquin County Public Health Services is offering free nutrition classes at Manteca Public Library, 320 W. Center St., Manteca. Each week a different topic will be covered, but participants can join at any time and no registration is required. Classes are open to the public and will include free healthy tools and food tastings. You will learn to: prepare new healthy recipes; make your food dollars count; understand food labels; eat more fruits and vegetables; build strong bones; and increase physical activity. Free cookbooks and take-home items. Information: (209) 468-3821. Funded by USDA SNAP-Ed, an equal opportunity provider and employer

Build Strong Bones in East Stockton

July 10 (Friday) noon to 1 p.m.: San Joaquin County Public Health Services is offering free nutrition classes at Health Net Community Center, 678 N. Wilson Way, Suite 16 (Eastland Plaza), Stockton. Each week a different topic will be covered, but participants can join at any time and no registration is required. Classes are open to the public and will include free healthy tools and food tastings. You will learn to: prepare new healthy recipes; make your food dollars count; understand food labels; eat more fruits and vegetables; build strong bones; and increase physical activity. Free cookbooks and take-home items. Information: (209) 468-3821. Funded by USDA SNAP-Ed, an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Make a Change in Manteca

July 14 (Tuesday) 4 to 5 p.m.: San Joaquin County Public Health Services is offering free nutrition classes at Manteca Public Library, 320 W. Center St., Manteca. Each week a different topic will be covered, but participants can join at any time and no registration is required. Classes are open to the public and will include free healthy tools and food tastings. You will learn to: prepare new healthy recipes; make your food dollars count; understand food labels; eat more fruits and vegetables; build strong bones; and increase physical activity. Free cookbooks and take-home items. Information: (209) 468-3821. Funded by USDA SNAP-Ed, an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Go Lean With Protein in East Stockton

July 17 (Friday) noon to 1 p.m.: San Joaquin County Public Health Services is offering free nutrition classes at Health Net Community Center, 678 N. Wilson Way, Suite 16 (Eastland Plaza), Stockton. Each week a different topic will be covered, but participants can join at any time and no registration is required. Classes are open to the public and will include free healthy tools and food tastings. You will learn to: prepare new healthy recipes; make your food dollars count; understand food labels; eat more fruits and vegetables; build strong bones; and increase physical activity. Free cookbooks and take-home items. Information: (209) 468-3821. Funded by USDA SNAP-Ed, an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Healthy Eating Active Living Quarterly Meeting

July 21 (Tuesday) 9 a.m. to noon: This quarter’s meeting at South Sacramento Christian Center, 7710 Stockton Blvd., Sacramento, will explore the Smarter Lunchrooms Movement and the EatFresh.org Resource. Please join us as we share best practices, exchange information and explore mutual interventions and cooperative efforts to provide nutrition and obesity prevention services. Participation is open to anyone interested in working collaboratively to improve the health of communities within the Delta and Gold Country Region of California. Registration is encouraged. CLICK HERE, For more information, please contact Lara Falkenstein.

Celebrate – Eat Smart in Manteca

July 21 (Tuesday) 4 to 5 p.m.: San Joaquin County Public Health Services is offering free nutrition classes at Manteca Public Library, 320 W. Center St., Manteca. Each week a different topic will be covered, but participants can join at any time and no registration is required. Classes are open to the public and will include free healthy tools and food tastings. You will learn to: prepare new healthy recipes; make your food dollars count; understand food labels; eat more fruits and vegetables; build strong bones; and increase physical activity. Free cookbooks and take-home items. Information: (209) 468-3821. Funded by USDA SNAP-Ed, an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Make a Change in East Stockton

July 24 (Friday) noon to 1 p.m.: San Joaquin County Public Health Services is offering free nutrition classes at Health Net Community Center, 678 N. Wilson Way, Suite 16 (Eastland Plaza), Stockton. Each week a different topic will be covered, but participants can join at any time and no registration is required. Classes are open to the public and will include free healthy tools and food tastings. You will learn to: prepare new healthy recipes; make your food dollars count; understand food labels; eat more fruits and vegetables; build strong bones; and increase physical activity. Free cookbooks and take-home items. Information: (209) 468-3821. Funded by USDA SNAP-Ed, an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Celebrate – Eat Smart in East Stockton

July 31 (Friday) noon to 1 p.m.: San Joaquin County Public Health Services is offering free nutrition classes at Health Net Community Center, 678 N. Wilson Way, Suite 16 (Eastland Plaza), Stockton. Each week a different topic will be covered, but participants can join at any time and no registration is required. Classes are open to the public and will include free healthy tools and food tastings. You will learn to: prepare new healthy recipes; make your food dollars count; understand food labels; eat more fruits and vegetables; build strong bones; and increase physical activity. Free cookbooks and take-home items. Information: (209) 468-3821. Funded by USDA SNAP-Ed, an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Free Health & Vision Fair in Stockton

Sept. 18 (Friday) 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.: The eighth annual Health & Vision Fair sponsored by the Community Center for the Blind, 130 W. Flora St., Stockton, will offer free vision screenings, hearing evaluations, blood pressure checks, goodies and giveaways. Bring your family. Many of Stockton’s resources and agencies will be represented. The Lions’ Eye Mobile will be on site. Information: (209) 466-3836.

Celebration on Central (Lodi) for Bi-National Health Week

Sept. 27 (Sunday) 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.: Up to 60 agencies will be providing information, free health screenings, arts and crafts activities, face painting, amusing clowns, free food, live entertainment, raffle prizes and agencies interacting with children and families at the Celebration on Central at Joe Serna Jr. Charter School, 29 S. Central Ave., Lodi.

Free Multicultural Health and Community Fair in Stockton

Oct. 10 (Saturday) 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.: West Lane Oaks Family Resource Center, part of the Community Partnership for Families of San Joaquin County, is planning its eighth Annual Multicultural Health and Community Fair at the Normandy Village Shopping Center, northeast corner of Hammer and West lanes, Stockton, in the parking lot adjacent to Carl’s Jr. We hope that you can join us this year and help to make our event a success. The goal of the Multicultural Health and Community Fair is to educate the community on where and how to find resources and programs through the various agencies in attendance and to celebrate our cultural diversity. Over 50 agencies participated at last year’s event. These agencies, such as social service agencies, health providers and financial planning, provided free services and assisted families with their various needs. We also provided activities for children. Over 600 families attended our event last year, and this year we hope to attract more than 1,000 families. Information: (209) 644-8619.

Celebrate Care Givers With an Inner Safari

Nov. 14 (Saturday) 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.: Healings in Motion presents its annual day to honor and recognize care givers: An Inner Safari – A Joyful Day to Relax, Retool and Renew. Event will be held at Robert Cabral Agricultural Center, 2101 E. Earhart Drive, Stockton. Information and registration: Click here.

CareVan Offers Free Mobile Health Clinic

St. Joseph’s Medical Center CareVan offers a free health clinic for low-income and no-insurance individuals or families, 16 years old and older. Mobile health care services will be available to handle most minor urgent health care needs such as mild burns, bumps, abrasions, sprains, sinus and urinary tract infections, cold and flu. No narcotics prescriptions will be available. Information: (209) 461-3471 or www.StJosephsCares.org/CarevanClinic schedule is subject to change without notice. Walk-In appointments are available.

  • Tuesdays 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.: Dollar General, 310 W. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., Stockton.
  • Wednesdays & Thursdays 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.: For those 16 and older only; San Joaquin County Fairgrounds, 1658 S. Airport Way, Stockton.

ER Wait Watcher: Which ER Will See You the Fastest?

Heading to the emergency room? ProPublica provides a great tool to help. You may wait a while before a doctor or other treating professional sees you — and the hospital nearest to you might not be the one that sees you the fastest. Click here to look up average ER wait times, as reported by hospitals to the federal government, as well as the time it takes to get there in current traffic, as reported by Google.

Farmers Markets In San Joaquin County

San Joaquin County Public Health Services Network for a Healthy California program has developed a list of San Joaquin County Farmers Markets as part of its goal to increase fruit and vegetable consumption. Click here for the latest list of farmers markets around San Joaquin County, including times and locations.

NEWS

Need Help in San Joaquin County? Call 2-1-1

Have no money for food? Just lost your job? Sick and need a health clinic? Depressed? How do I file taxes? Call 2-1-1 for help. Click here for the flier.

AMA Strengthens Youth Policy on E-Cigarettes

With the growing popularity of electronic cigarettes among the nation’s youth, the American Medical Association (AMA) adopted new policy to further strengthen its support of regulatory oversight of electronic cigarettes. The policy calls for the passage of laws and regulations that would: set the minimum legal purchase age for electronic cigarettes and their liquid nicotine refills at 21 years old; require liquid nicotine to be packaged in child-resistant containers; and urge strict enforcement of laws prohibiting the sale of tobacco products to minors. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s 2014 National Youth Tobacco Survey, e-cigarette use among middle and high school students tripled from 2013 to 2014. The survey data showed e-cigarette use among high school students increased from 4.5 percent in 2013 to 13.4 percent in 2014 – an increase from approximately 660,000 to 2 million students. Among middle school students, the data indicated that e-cigarette use more than tripled from 1.1 percent in 2013 to 3.9 percent in 2014 – an increase from approximately 120,000 to 450,000 students. “The AMA continues to advocate for more stringent policies to protect our country’s youth from the dangers of tobacco use and improve public health. The AMA’s newest policy expands on the AMA’s longtime efforts to help keep all tobacco products, including electronic cigarettes, out of the hands of young people, by urging laws to deter the sale of electronic cigarettes to anyone under the age of 21,” AMA President Dr. Robert Wah said. “We also urge the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to act now to implement its proposed rule to effectively regulate electronic cigarettes.” The new policy extends existing AMA policy adopted in 2013 and 2014 calling for all electronic cigarettes to be subject to the same regulations and oversight that the FDA applies to tobacco and nicotine products, seeking tighter marketing restrictions on manufacturers, and prohibiting claims that electronic cigarettes are effective tobacco cessation tools. “Improving the health of the nation is AMA’s top priority and we will continue to advocate for policies that help reduce the burden of preventable diseases like cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes, both of which can be linked to smoking,” Wah said.

Valley Children’s, Stanford Partner on Pediatric Programs

Valley Children’s Healthcare of Madera and Stanford University School of Medicine will partner to create a graduate medical education program based at Valley Children’s Hospital. “Valley Children’s is taking the lead in training the next generation of pediatricians and pediatric surgical and medical specialists,” said Dr. David Christensen, Valley Children’s chief medical officer. “With Stanford as our academic partner, we’ll prepare doctors to continue providing the highest quality medical care for children.” The “Valley Children’s Pediatric Residency Program, Affiliated with Stanford University School of Medicine” will allow Valley Children’s residents to have rotations and learning opportunities at the Palo Alto campus and for Stanford’s residents to learn here. The fellowship program at Valley Children’s will be the first of its kind in the Valley. It will train doctors to become pediatric subspecialists, building on the highest quality of exceptional care in service lines like pediatric surgery, gastroenterology and emergency medicine. “We are excited about the opportunity to partner with Valley Children’s in the creation of a new, pediatric-focused teaching program in Central California and for our current residents and fellows to rotate at Valley Children’s,” said Dr. Lloyd Minor, dean of the Stanford University School of Medicine. “Valley Children’s is one of the largest children’s hospitals in California and has the state’s busiest emergency department for patients younger than 21 years of age. By spending time there, our residents will have the opportunity to see a wide variety of complex and critically ill patients in a short period of time.” A unique aspect of the Pediatric Residency and Fellowship programs will be Valley Children’s partnership with hospitals and medical groups throughout the area. Valley Children’s residents and fellows will have the opportunity for rotations at partner locations – including Kaiser Permanente and Saint Agnes Medical Center in Fresno and Dignity Health – and local pediatricians’ offices. “These relationships are key to the success of our program,” said Valley Children’s President and CEO Todd Suntrapak. “One of our goals is to attract pediatricians and subspecialists to our area and keep them here. That means more Valley families will have access to the care they need, right where they live. One of the best ways we can do this is by exposing our residents and fellows to the diverse practice opportunities that exist in the Central Valley. We are grateful that so many groups are committed to helping Valley Children’s train the next generation of pediatricians and pediatric specialists.” Leading the new program is Valley Children’s Chief of Pediatrics Dr. Jolie Limon. Limon joined Valley Children’s as a pediatric hospitalist in 2000. She has won numerous teaching awards during her tenure and her areas of expertise include resident leadership and interprofessional education. “This is an exciting time,” Limon said. “I look forward to building a program that not only trains exceptional pediatricians but also creates future leaders in pediatric care for the Valley. Valley Children’s Hospital has a wealth of wonderful clinicians, educators and patients by which to sustain an amazing training program.” Valley Children’s Hospital will continue to serve as a teaching site for more than 190 residents and medical students in a dozen other programs, including those based at Kaweah Delta Health Care District in Visalia, Mercy Medical Center in Merced and Clinica Sierra Vista in Fresno.

California Endowment Unveils New Website

The California Endowment, the state’s largest health foundation, today unveiled its new website – designed to bring more tools and features to its users, and allowing The Endowment to better connect with its many partner organizations, as well as thought leaders and the people of California. “Our new site is an important engine to support The Endowment’s work to transform communities across California, and improve the fundamental health status of all Californians,” said Dr. Robert Ross, M.D., chief executive officer. “The site’s new features allow us to reach more people and ultimately help realize more change throughout California.” The website offers a fresh design and fully integrates with today’s digital environment. It’s mobile friendly and easily accessible with new tools, interactive graphics, timely information and links to The Endowment’s social media platforms. Please visit the site at www.calendow.org.

Top Chronic Conditions: 11 Million and Counting

 SEE THE REPORT

GET THE CHARTS

Chronic conditions are the leading cause of death and disability in the United States, and the biggest contributor to health care costs. But there is wide variation in their incidence, with major differences depending on age, income, race and ethnicity, and insurance status. In addition, many Californians with chronic conditions are delaying needed care because of cost. Californians with the Top Chronic Conditions: 11 Million and Counting looks at five major chronic conditions — asthma, diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure, and serious psychological distress — and how each of these affects Californians. Among the key findings:

  • About 40% of adults reported having at least one of the five chronic conditions studied.
  • High blood pressure is the most common chronic condition, affecting about one in four, or 7.6 million, adults in California.
  • As income rises, the prevalence of chronic conditions falls. Adults living under 138% of the federal poverty level were more likely to have two or more chronic conditions (14%) than those in the highest income group, 400%+ of the federal poverty level (8%).
  • Of Californians with psychological distress, 34% delayed needed medical care, and 27% delayed filling prescriptions. Cost or lack of insurance was frequently cited as the reason for these delays.
  • Of Californians age 65 or older, 70% have at least one chronic condition, compared to 26% of those age 18 to 39.

See the complete report and charts now.

This report is published as part of the CHCF California Health Care Almanac, an online clearinghouse for key data and analysis examining California’s health care marketplace. Find all Almanac reports at www.chcf.org/almanac.

Resources to Help You Better Understand Stem Cell Science

The International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) has launched an expanded “Closer Look at Stem Cells” website www.closerlookatstemcells.org , an online resource to help patients and their families make informed decisions about stem cell treatments, clinics and their health. The ISSCR, a global membership-based organization comprised of approximately 4,000 stem cell researchers, clinicians and ethicists, is concerned that stem cell treatments are being marketed by clinics around the world without appropriate oversight and patient protections in place to ensure safety and likely benefit. New resources on the website emphasize key scientific principles and practices that will help the public to better evaluate treatment claims. “The ‘Closer Look at Stem Cells’ website is a direct channel from researchers to the public,” said Megan Munsie, a scientist with Stem Cells Australia and chairperson of the ISSCR task force responsible for the website expansion. “Promising clinical trials are under way for many diseases and conditions, but most stem cell-based treatments are still in the future. We hope that the website will foster interest and excitement in the science, but also an understanding of the current limitations of stem cells as medicine and a healthy skepticism of clinics selling treatments.” The website, once patient focused, is now a comprehensive destination for those interested in stem cell science and research being conducted across the globe. It includes informational pages on basic stem cell biology, the process by which science becomes medicine, clinical trials and the use of stem cells in understanding specific health conditions – macular degeneration, multiple sclerosis, heart disease and diabetes. Pages on other conditions will be added in the coming months. It is also home to the “Stem Cells in Focus” blog, which seeks to make cutting-edge research from the stem cell field accessible to non-scientists. “I am often contacted by patients struggling with very difficult decisions about their health, and who want to know more about the potential of stem cells,” said Larry Goldstein, a stem cell scientist at the University of California, San Diego and a member of the ISSCR task force responsible for the website expansion. “My experience is that understanding the current state of stem cell science and medicine is key to making informed decisions about stem cell treatments, and so I encourage patients to start their journey on the ‘Closer Look at Stem Cells’ website.”

California Debuts Ads to Counter E-Cigarettes

Twenty-five years after launching the first anti-smoking advertisements in the state, the California Department of Public Health on March 23 premiered a series of television, digital, and outdoor ads in a new campaign called “Wake Up,” as part of its educational effort to inform the public about the dangers of e-cigarettes. “California has been a world leader in tobacco use prevention and cessation since 1990, with one of the lowest youth and adult smoking rates in the nation. The aggressive marketing and escalating use of e-cigarettes threatens to erode that progress,” said Dr. Karen Smith, newly appointed CDPH director and state health officer. CDPH recently released a report and health advisory highlighting areas of concern regarding e-cigarettes, including the sharp rise in e-cigarette use among California teens and young adults, the highly addictive nature of nicotine in e-cigarettes, the surge in accidental nicotine poisonings occurring in young children, and that secondhand e-cigarette emissions contain several toxic chemicals. Research shows that youth and young adults who use e-cigarettes are far more likely to also use traditional cigarettes and other tobacco products. “Our advertising campaign is telling the public to ‘wake up’ to the fact that these are highly addictive products being mass marketed,” said Dr. Smith. The advertising campaign includes two television ads that feature songs from the 1950s and ‘60s and images portraying the health risks of e-cigarettes. One TV ad underscores the e-cigarette industry’s use of candy flavored ‘e-juice’ and products that entice the next generation to become addicted to nicotine. The second TV spot emphasizes the dangers and addictiveness of e-cigarettes, while exposing the fact that big tobacco companies are in the e-cigarette business. E-cigarettes are largely unregulated at the federal level and companies are not required to disclose what is in their products or how they are made. To inform the public about the dangers of e-cigarettes, CDPH launched an educational campaign in late January. The advertising component kicked off on March 23 and runs through June 2015, with TV and digital ads on websites, online radio and social media throughout the state. Outdoor ads, including billboards, at gas stations and in malls, and ads in movie theaters will be phased in throughout the campaign. This counter e-cigarette advertising campaign is part of CDPH’s ongoing anti- tobacco media efforts. In addition to the advertising, the CDPH educational campaign will include:

  • Partnering with the local public health, medical, and child care organizations to increase awareness about the known toxicity of e-cigarettes and the high risk of poisonings, especially to children, while continuing to promote and support the use of proven effective cessation therapies.
  • Joining with the California Department of Education and school officials to assist in providing accurate information to parents, students, teachers, and school administrators on the dangers of e-cigarettes.

The California Tobacco Control Program was established by the Tobacco Tax and Health Protection Act of 1988. The act, approved by California voters, instituted a 25-cent tax on each pack of cigarettes and earmarked 5 cents of that tax to fund California’s tobacco control efforts. These efforts include supporting local health departments and community organizations, a media campaign, and evaluation and surveillance. California’s comprehensive approach has changed social norms around tobacco use and secondhand smoke. California’s tobacco control efforts have reduced both adult and youth smoking rates by 50 percent, saved more than 1 million lives and have resulted in $134 billion worth of savings in health care costs. Learn more at TobaccoFreeCA.com.

Manteca Unified Students Learn Hands-Only CPR

Knowing the importance of quick action upon a person experiencing sudden cardiac arrest, the hands-only CPR push was created by Manteca Unified School District Health Services’ Caroline Thibodeau and Secondary Education’s Tevani Liotard along with Manteca District Ambulance Service’s Jonathan Mendoza. Other agencies who take part are Manteca Fire Department, Lathrop-Manteca Fire Department and Stockton Fire Department. The group has presented a hands-Only CPR lecture and hands-on demonstration to all MUSD ninth-grade students. The lecture and presentation has been used throughout the MUSD high schools over the past 16 months. A total of 2,794 students and 73 adults have been taught the hands-only CPR to date. By the end of the school year, the number will increase to more than 3,500 students. All students get to experience hands-on by doing chest compression on a mannequin plus hearing and seeing the importance of quickly starting hands- only CPR quickly till help arrives. Paramedics, firefighters and teachers assist the students during the mannequin chest compression portion.  a majority of the students say, “Doing chest compressions is harder than I thought, but, I now feel I can do it or tell someone how to do it.” In December, a student at Manteca High School collapsed in the middle of class experiencing a sudden cardiac arrest.  Due to the quick action of the vice principal, Manteca Police Department resource officer, Manteca District Ambulance EMTs and paramedics, Manteca firefighters and continuous care at St. Joseph’s Medical Center and Stanford Hospital, this student is alive and has fully recovered.

Comprehensive Website Aims to Reduce Health Disparities

Welltopia, a new website launched by the California Department of Health Care Services and the UC Davis Institute for Population Health Improvement, offers a wide range of essential resources to help Californians, especially those on limited incomes, build healthier lives and communities. Designed to complement the popularWelltopia by DHCS Facebook page, the new website at MyWelltopia.com serves as a comprehensive resource connecting individuals, families and communities to credible information that addresses the social determinants of health and other leading causes of preventable death. Many studies have shown that access to health care, education, employment, housing, nutritious foods and physical activity are among the fundamental drivers of health for individuals and their communities. Making reliable information and resources available for people of all ages is key to creating healthy environments. “We developed Welltopia to be a convenient and trusted source of information covering all three aspects of health — physical, mental and well-being,” said Neal Kohatsu, DHCS medical director. “We’ve made every effort to ensure that the resources are both accurate and accessible to consumers.” The Welltopia site organizes information into five categories — Well Body, Well Mind, Jobs & Training, Health Insurance, and Basic Needs. It includes information on nutrition, physical activity, smoking cessation, alcohol- and drug-abuse prevention, stress management, health insurance, residency and social services, among others. The site also contains videos, photos and graphics with information about health-related programs. There are free applications, such as fitness trackers, women’s health information, recipes and food journals to track daily calorie intake, and links to CalFresh, education, job placement resources and other social services. “Welltopia should be the first stop for persons seeking reliable information about the many determinants of health,” said Kenneth Kizer, IPHI director. “Its friendly format quickly guides users to practical and trustworthy sources.” The Department of Health Care Services manages California’s form of Medicaid, known as Medi-Cal, which helps millions of low-income Californians obtain access to affordable, high-quality health care, including medical, dental, mental health, substance use disorder services, and long-term services and supports. DHCS aims to preserve and improve the health of all Californians. The UC Davis Institute for Population Health Improvement fosters population health within the UC Davis Health System and communities throughout the state. IPHI’s mission is to create, apply and disseminate knowledge about the many determinants of health to improve health and health security, and to support activities that improve health equity and eliminate health disparities.

Protect Your Family From E-Cigarettes

Read some facts from the California Department of Public Health. To learn more, click here.

HICAP Seeking Volunteers to Counsel Seniors on Medicare

HICAP – the Health Insurance Counseling and Advocacy Program – is a nonprofit organization dedicated to helping Medicare beneficiaries navigate the Medicare maze.  We do this in one-on-one counseling sessions, with registered HICAP volunteer counselors. HICAP counselors help Medicare beneficiaries: understand Medicare; compare supplemental policies; review HMO and PPO benefits; learn about government assistance programs; prepare appeals and challenge denials, and clarify rights as a health care consumer.  Our services are always free and always unbiased.  We neither sell nor recommend specific insurance companies.  Rather, we educate beneficiaries to make the choice best for their needs. We are looking for energetic seniors who are computer-savvy, interested in learning, and good communicators.  We will conduct training in San Joaquin County soon.  If you are interested in learning more about HICAP volunteering, contact HICAP at (209) 470-7812.

Breastfeeding and Working

The Breastfeeding Coalition of San Joaquin County offers its “Working & Breastfeeding” Toolkit at BreastfeedSJC.org. This toolkit contains tips, answers to frequently asked questions and links to online resources for families and employers. Jump on over to BreastfeedSJC.org/Working-and-Breastfeeding to check it out.

Diabetes Resources in San Joaquin County

Diabetes is a costly disease, both in terms of people’s health and well-being, and in terms of dollars spent on treatment, medications and lost days at work and school. San Joaquin County annually accounts for among the worst death rates from diabetes among all 58 California counties. In an attempt to make its estimated 60,000 residents with diabetes aware of the many local resources available to help them deal with the disease, a dozen billboards in English and Spanish have been posted around the county directing readers to the UniteForDiabetesSJC.org website. At that website is information on numerous free classes and programs that provide education and training on preventing diabetes, managing the disease, controlling its side effects, and links to more resources, including special events and finding a physician. For questions on how to navigate the website or find a class, residents may call Vanessa Armendariz, community project manager at the San Joaquin Medical Society, at(209) 952-5299. The billboards came about through the efforts of the Diabetes Work Group, a subcommittee of San Joaquin County Public Health’s Obesity and Chronic Disease Prevention Task Force. Funding was provided through a grant from Kaiser Permanente Community Benefit Programs Division-Central Valley Area.

Senior Gateway Website: Don’t Be a Victim

California Insurance Commissioner Dave Jones has unveiled a new consumer protection tool for California seniors, who have traditionally been prime targets for con artists. The California Department of Insurance (CDI) is hosting a new Web site www.seniors.ca.gov to educate seniors and their advocates and provide helpful information about how to avoid becoming victims of personal or financial abuse. The Web site, called Senior Gateway, is important because seniors, including older veterans, are disproportionately at risk of being preyed upon financially and subjected to neglect and abuse. The Senior Gateway is sponsored by the Elder Financial Abuse Interagency Roundtable (E-FAIR), convened by CDI and includes representatives from many California agencies who share a common purpose of safeguarding the welfare of California’s seniors. “The goal of this collaborative effort is to assemble, in one convenient location, valuable information not only for seniors, but their families and caregivers. This site will help California seniors find resources and solve problems, and will enable participating agencies to better serve this important segment of our population,” Jones said. The site offers seniors valuable tips and resources in the following areas, and more:

  • Avoiding and reporting abuse and neglect by in-home caregivers or in facilities; learn about different types of abuse and the warning signs.
  • Preventing and reporting financial fraud, abuse and scams targeting seniors.
  • Understanding health care, insurance, Medicare and long-term care; know what long-term care includes.
  • Locating services and programs available to assist older adults.
  • Knowing your rights before buying insurance; what seniors need to know about annuities.
  • Investing wisely and understanding the ins and outs of reverse mortgages.

$5,000 Grants Help Pay for Children’s Medical Expenses

UnitedHealthcare Children’s Foundation (UHCCF) is seeking grant applications from families in need of financial assistance to help pay for their child’s health care treatments, services or equipment not covered, or not fully covered, by their commercial health insurance plan. Qualifying families can receive up to $5,000 to help pay for medical services and equipment such as physical, occupational and speech therapy, counseling services, surgeries, prescriptions, wheelchairs, orthotics, eyeglasses and hearing aids. To be eligible for a grant, children must be 16 years of age or younger. Families must meet economic guidelines, reside in the United States and have a commercial health insurance plan. Grants are available for medical expenses families have incurred 60 days prior to the date of application as well as for ongoing and future medical needs. Parents or legal guardians may apply for grants at www.uhccf.org, and there is no application deadline. Organizations or private donors can make tax-deductible donations to the foundation at this website. In 2011, UHCCF awarded more than 1,200 grants to families across the United States for treatments associated with medical conditions such as cancer, spina bifida, muscular dystrophy, diabetes, hearing loss, autism, cystic fibrosis, Down syndrome, ADHD and cerebral palsy.

Facts About Fruits and Vegetables

Click here for lots of great information about fruits and vegetables.

ONGOING

Cambodian and Hmong Language Diabetes Classes

The Cambodian and Hmong communities of Stockton are invited to attend free diabetes classes presented in the Khmer and Hmong languages. Call Jou Moua at (209) 298-2374 or (209) 461-3224 to find a class.

Fit Families for Life

Fit Families for Life is a weekly class for parents offered by HealthNet and held at Fathers and Families of San Joaquin, 338 E. Market St., Stockton. All parents are welcome and there is no cost to attend. Participants will learn about nutrition, cooking and exercise. Information and registration: Renee Garcia at (209) 941-0701.

Journey to Control Diabetes Education Program

Mondays 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.: Dameron Hospital offers a free diabetes education program, with classes held in the Dameron Hospital Annex, 445 W. Acacia St., Stockton. Preregistration is required. Contact Carolyn Sanders, RN, at c.sanders@dameronhospital.org(209) 461-3136 or (209) 461-7597.

Al-Anon Freedom to Change Support Group

Mondays and Thursdays 7 to 8:30 p.m.: Lodi Health offers Al-Anon Freedom to Change meetings for family and friends of problem drinkers. The group helps people to know what to do when someone close to them drinks too much. Meetings are offered several times each month at Lodi Memorial Hospital, 975 S. Fairmont Ave., Lodi. Information: www.lodihealth.org.

Man-to-Man Prostate Cancer Support Group

First Monday of Month 7 to 9 p.m.: Dameron Hospital, 525 W. Acacia St., Stockton, holds a support group for men diagnosed with prostate cancer and their families and caregivers. The meetings are facilitated by trained volunteers who are prostate cancer survivors. Information: Ernest Pontiflet at (209) 952-9092.

Crystal Meth Anonymous Recovery Group

Mondays 6:30 p.m.: 825 Central Ave., Lodi. Information: (209) 430-9780 or (209) 368-0756.

Yoga for People Dealing with Cancer

Mondays 5:30 to 7 p.m.: This free weekly Yoga & Breathing class for cancer patients will help individuals sleep better and reduce pain. This class is led by yoga instructor Chinu Mehdi in Classrooms 1 and 2, St. Joseph’s Medical Center, 1800 N. California St., Stockton. Information: (209) 467-6550 orSJCancerInfo@dignityhealth.org.

Respiratory Support Group for Better Breathing

First Tuesday of month 10 to 11 a.m.: Lodi Health’s Respiratory Therapy Department and the American Lung Association of California Valley Lode offer a free “Better Breathers’” respiratory-support group for people and their family members with breathing problems including asthma, bronchitis and emphysema. Participants will learn how to cope with chronic lung disease, understand lungs and how they work and use medications and oxygen properly. The group meets at Lodi Health West, 800 S. Lower Sacramento Road, Lodi. Pre-registration is recommended by calling (209) 339-7445. For information on other classes available at Lodi Memorial, visit its website at www.lodihealth.org.

The Beat Goes On Cardiac Support Group

First Tuesday of month 11 a.m. to noon: Lodi Health offers a free cardiac support group at Lodi Health West, 800 S. Lower Sacramento Road, Lodi. “The Beat Goes On” cardiac support group is a community-based nonprofit group that offers practical tools for healthy living to heart disease patients, their families and caregivers. Its mission is to provide community awareness that those with heart disease can live well through support meetings and educational forums. Upcoming topics include exercise, stress management and nutrition counseling services. All are welcomed to attend. Information: (209) 339-7664.

Planned Childbirth Services

Tuesdays 6 to 8 p.m.: Dameron Hospital, 525 W. Acacia St., Stockton, hosts a four-class series which answers questions and prepares mom and her partner for labor and birth. Bring two pillows and a comfortable blanket or exercise mat to each class. These classes are requested during expecting mother’s third trimester. Information/registration: Carolyn Sanders, RN (209) 461-3136 or www.Dameronhospital.org.

Lactation Support Group in Lodi

Tuesdays 10 a.m.: Lodi Health offers The Lactation Club, a support group for breastfeeding moms that is held in Classroom A at Lodi Memorial Hospital, 975 S. Fairmont Ave., Lodi. Lactation consultants are readily available to answer questions and help with breastfeeding issues. A scale will also be on hand to weigh babies. Information: (209) 339.7872 or www.lodihealth.org.

Say Yes to Breastfeeding

Tuesdays 6 to 8 p.m.: Dameron Hospital, 525 W. Acacia St., Stockton, offers a class that outlines the information and basic benefits and risk management of breastfeeding. Topics include latching, early skin-to-skin on cue, expressing milk and helpful hints on early infant feeding. In addition, the hospital offers a monthly Mommy and Me-Breastfeeding support group where mothers, babies and hospital clerical staff meet the second Monday of each month. Information/registration: Carolyn Sanders, RN (209) 461-3136 or www.Dameronhospital.org.

Precious Preemies

Second Tuesday of the month, 9:30 to 10:30 a.m.: Precious Preemies: A Discussion Group for Families Raising Premature Infants and Infants with Medical Concerns required registration and is held at Family Resource Network, Sherwood Executive Center, 5250 Claremont Ave., Suite 148, Stockton. Information: www.frcn.org/calendar.asp or (209) 472-3674 or (800) 847-3030.

Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous

Are you having trouble controlling the way you eat? Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous (FA) is a free Twelve Step recovery program for anyone suffering from food obsession, overeating, undereating or bulimia. For more information or a list of additional meetings throughout the U.S. and the world, call (781) 932-6300 or visitwww.foodaddicts.org.

  • Tuesdays 7 p.m.: Modesto Unity Church, 2547 Veneman Ave., Modesto.
  • Wednesdays 9 a.m.: The Episcopal Church of Saint Anne, 1020 W. Lincoln Road, Stockton.
  • Saturdays 9 a.m.: Tracy Community Church, 1790 Sequoia Blvd. at Corral Hollow, Tracy.

Diabetes: Basics to a Healthy Life

Wednesdays 10 a.m.: Free eight-class ongoing series every Wednesday except the month of September. Click here for detailsSt. Joseph’s Medical Center, Cleveland Classroom, 2102 N. California St., Stockton. Information: (209) 944-8355 or www.StJosephsCares.org/Diabetes.

Break From Stress

Wednesdays 6 to 7 p.m.: St. Joseph’s Medical Center offers the community a break from their stressful lives with Break from Stress sessions. These sessions are free, open to the public, with no pre-registration necessary. Just drop in, take a deep breath and relax through a variety of techniques. Break from Stress sessions are held in St. Joseph’s Cleveland Classroom (behind HealthCare Clinical Lab on California Street just north of the medical center. Information: SJCancerInfo@DignityHealth.org or (209) 467-6550.

Mother-Baby Breast Connection

Wednesdays 1 to 3 p.m.: Join a lactation consultant for support and advice on the challenges of early breastfeeding. Come meet other families and attend as often as you like. A different topic of interest will be offered each week with time for breastfeeding assistance and questions. Pre-registration is required. Call (209) 467-6331. St. Joseph’s Medical Center, Pavilion Conference Room (1st floor), 1800 N. California St., Stockton.

Adult Children With Aging Relatives

Second Wednesday of month 4:30 p.m.: Lodi Health offers an Adult Children with Aging Relatives support group at the Hutchins Street Square Senior Center. Information: (209) 369-4443 or (209) 369-6921.

Diabetes Support Group in Stockton

Third Wednesday of month 5:30 to 7 p.m.: This support group will help you deal with issues of diabetes through avoiding lifelong complications. Accomplished by increasing daily activities, learning to take your medications  properly, and overcoming depression, frustration and feeling alone. Each month there will be resources including dietitians, doctors, pharmacists and literature is available to assist you. Knowledge is power. This is a free program (no registration is required). Monthly meetings will be held at St. Joseph’s Medical Center, 1800 N. California St., Stockton, in the basement Classroom 3. Any questions or comments call Susan Sanchez, RN, Certified Diabetes Educator: (209) 662-9487.

Smoking Cessation Class in Lodi

Wednesdays 3 to 4 p.m.: Lodi Health offers an eight-session smoking-cessation class for those wishing to become smoke free. Classes are held weekly in the Lodi Health Pulmonary Rehabilitation Department at Lodi Memorial Hospital, 975 S. Fairmont Ave., Lodi. Topics covered include benefits of quitting; ways to cope with quitting; how to deal with a craving; medications that help with withdrawal; and creating a support system. Call the Lodi Health Lung Health Line at (209) 339-7445 to register.

Individual Stork Tours At Dameron

Wednesdays 5 to 7 p.m.: Dameron Hospital, 525 W. Acacia St., Stockton, offers 30 minute guided tours that provide expecting parents with a tour of Labor/Delivery, the Mother-Baby Unit and an overview of the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. New mothers are provided information on delivery services, where to go and what to do once delivery has arrived, and each mother can create an individual birthing plan. Information/registration: Carolyn Sanders, RN (209) 461-3136or www.Dameronhospital.org.

Brain Builders Weekly Program

Thursdays 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.: Lodi Health and the Hutchins Street Square Senior Center offer “Brain Builders,” a weekly program for people in the early stages of memory loss. There is a weekly fee of $25. Registration is required. Information or to register, call (209) 369-4443 or (209) 369-6921.

Infant CPR and Safety

Second Thursday of month 5 to 7 p.m.: Dameron Hospital, 525 W. Acacia St., Stockton, offers a class to family members to safely take care of their newborn.  Family members are taught infant CPR and relief of choking, safe sleep and car seat safety.  Regarding infant safety, the hospital offers on the fourth Thursday of each month from 5 to 7 p.m. a NICU/SCN family support group. This group is facilitated by a Master Prepared Clinical Social Worker and the Dameron NICU staff with visits from the hospital’s neonatologist. Information/registration: Carolyn Sanders, RN (209) 461-3136 or www.Dameronhospital.org.

Group Meetings for Alzheimer’s Patients, Caregivers

Thursdays 10 to 11:30 a.m.: The Alzheimer’s Aid Society of Northern California in conjunction with Villa Marche residential care facility conducts a simultaneous Caregiver’s Support Group and Patient’s Support Group at Villa Marche, 1119 Rosemarie Lane, Stockton. Caregivers, support people or family members of anyone with dementia are welcome to attend the caregiver’s group, led by Rita Vasquez. It’s a place to listen, learn and share. At the same time, Alzheimer’s and dementia patients can attend the patient’s group led by Sheryl Ashby. Participants will learn more about dementia and how to keep and enjoy the skills that each individual possesses. There will be brain exercises and reminiscence. The meeting is appropriate for anyone who enjoys socialization and is able to attend with moderate supervision. Information: (209) 477-4858.

Clase Gratuita de Diabetes en Español

Cada segundo Viernes del mes: Participantes aprenderán los fundamentos sobre la observación de azúcar de sangre, comida saludable, tamaños de porción y medicaciones. Un educador con certificado del control de diabetes dará instruccion sobre la autodirección durante de esta clase. Para mas información y registración:(209) 944-8355. Aprenda más de los programas de diabetes en el sitio electronico de St. Joseph’s: www.StJosephsCares.org/Diabetes

Nutrition on the Move Class

Fridays 11 a.m. to noon: Nutrition Education Center at Emergency Food Bank, 7 W. Scotts Ave., Stockton.  Free classes are general nutrition classes where you’ll learn about the new My Plate standards, food label reading, nutrition and exercise, eating more fruits and vegetables, and other tips. Information: (209) 464-7369or www.stocktonfoodbank.org.

Crystal Meth Anonymous Recovery Group

Fridays 6 p.m.: St. Joseph’s Behavioral Health (in trailer at the rear of building), 2510 N. California St., Stockton. Information: (209) 461-2000.

Free Diabetes Class in Spanish

Second Friday of every month: Participants will learn the basics about blood sugar monitoring, healthy foods, portion sizes, medications and self-management skills from a certified diabetic educator during this free class. St. Joseph’s Medical Center, 1800 N. California St., Stockton. Information and registration: (209) 944-8355. Learn more on St. Joseph’s diabetes programs at www.StJosephsCares.org/Diabetes.

National Alliance on Mental Health: Family-to-Family Education

Saturdays 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.: NAMI presents a free series of 12 weekly education classes for friends and family of people with major depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder, borderline personality disorder, panic disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, and co-occurring brain disorders. Classes will be held at 530 W. Acacia St., Stockton (across from Dameron Hospital) on the second floor. Information or to register: (209) 468-3755.

Multiple Sclerosis Self-Help Group

Second Saturday of Every Month 10 a.m. to noon: Multiple Sclerosis Self-Help Group meeting are for family, friends, caregivers and individuals with multiple sclerosis. We invite you to join us for a few moments of exchanging ideas and management skills to help you live and work with multiple sclerosis, a chronic disease. Meetings are at St. Joseph’s Medical Center, 1800 N. California St., Stockton, in Classroom 1 in the basement. Information: Laurie (209) 915-1730 or Velma (209) 951-2264.

All Day Prepared Childbirth Class

Third Saturday of month 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.: Dameron Hospital, 525 W. Acacia St., Stockton, offers community service educational class of prebirth education and mentoring. Information/registration: Carolyn Sanders, RN (209) 461-3136 or www.Dameronhospital.org.

Big Brother/Big Sister

Second Sunday of month: Dameron Hospital, 525 W. Acacia St., Stockton, has a one-hour class meeting designed specifically for newborn’s siblings. Topics include family role, a labor/delivery tour and a video presentation which explains hand washing/germ control and other household hygiene activities. This community service class ends with a Certification of Completion certificate. Information/registration: Carolyn Sanders, RN (209) 461-3136 or www.Dameronhospital.org.

Outpatient Program Aimed at Teens

Two programs: Adolescents face a number of challenging issues while trying to master their developmental milestones. Mental health issues (including depression), substance abuse and family issues can hinder them from mastering the developmental milestones that guide them into adulthood. The Adolescent Intensive Outpatient Program (IOP) offered by St. Joseph’s Behavioral Health Center, 2510 N. California St., Stockton, is designed for those individuals who need comprehensive treatment for their mental, emotional or chemical dependency problems. This program uses Dialectical Behavioral Therapy to present skills for effective living. Patients learn how to identify and change distorted thinking, communicate effectively in relationships and regain control of their lives. The therapists work collaboratively with parents, doctors and schools. They also put together a discharge plan so the patient continues to get the help they need to thrive into adulthood.

  • Psychiatric Adolescent IOP meets Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays from 4 to 7:30 p.m.
  • Chemical Recovery Adolescent IOP meets Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays from 4 to 7 p.m.

For more information about this and other groups, (209) 461-2000 and ask to speak with a behavioral evaluator or visit www.StJosephsCanHelp.org.

Stork Tours in Lodi

Parents-to-be are offered individual tours of the Lodi Memorial Hospital Maternity Department, 975 S. Fairmont Ave., Lodi. Prospective parents may view the labor, delivery and recovery areas of the hospital and ask questions of the nursing staff. Phone (209) 339-7879 to schedule a tour. For more information on other classes offered by Lodi Health, visit www.lodihealth.org.

HOSPITALS and MEDICAL GROUPS

Community Medical Centers

Click here for Community Medical Centers (Channel Medical Clinic, San Joaquin Valley Dental Group, etc.) website.

Dameron Hospital Events

Click here for Dameron Hospital’s Event Calendar.

Doctors Hospital of Manteca Events

Click here for Doctors Hospital of Manteca Events finder.

Hill Physicians

Click here for Hill Physicians website.

Kaiser Permanente Central Valley

Click here for Kaiser Central Valley News and Events

Lodi Memorial Hospital

Click here for Lodi Memorial Hospital.

Mark Twain Medical Center

Click here for Mark Twain Medical Center in San Andreas.

Planned Parenthood Mar Monte

Click here to find a Planned Parenthood Health Center near you.

San Joaquin General Hospital

Click here for San Joaquin General Hospital website.

St. Joseph’s Medical Center Classes and Events

Click here for St. Joseph’s Medical Center’s Classes and Events.

Sutter Gould Medical Foundation

Click here for Sutter Gould news. Click here for Sutter Gould calendar of events.

Sutter Tracy Community Hospital Education and Support

Click here for Sutter Tracy Community Hospital events, classes and support groups.

PUBLIC HEALTH

San Joaquin County Public Health Services General Information

Ongoing resources for vaccinations and clinic information are:

  1. Public Health Services Influenza website, www.sjcphs.org
  2. Recorded message line at (209) 469-8200, extension 2# for English and 3# for Spanish.
  3. For further information, individuals may call the following numbers at Public Health Services:
  • For general vaccine and clinic questions, call (209) 468-3862;
  • For medical questions, call (209) 468-3822.

Health officials continue to recommend these precautionary measures to help protect against acquiring influenza viruses:

  1. Wash your hands often with soap and water or use alcohol based sanitizers.
  2. Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue or your sleeve, when you cough or sneeze.
  3. Stay home if you are sick until you are free of a fever for 24 hours.
  4. Get vaccinated.

Public Health Services Clinic Schedules (Adults and Children)

Immunization clinic hours are subject to change depending on volume of patients or staffing. Check the Public Health Services website for additional evening clinics or special clinics at www.sjcphs.org. Clinics with an asterisk (*) require patients to call for an appointment.

Stockton Health Center: 1601 E. Hazelton Ave.; (209) 468-3830.

  • Immunizations: Monday 1-4 p.m.; Tuesday 1-4 p.m.; Wednesday 10 a.m.-1 p.m.; Thursday 8-11 a.m. and 1-4 p.m.; Friday 8-11 a.m.
  • Travel clinic*: Thursday 8-11 a.m. and 1 to 4 p.m.
  • Health exams*: Tuesday 1-4 p.m.; Wednesday 10 a.m.-1 p.m.; Friday 8-11 a.m.
  • Sexually transmitted disease clinic: Wednesday 3-6 p.m. and Friday 1-4 p.m., walk-in and by appointment.
  • Tuberculosis clinic*: Tuesday; second and fourth Wednesday of the month.
  • HIV testing: Tuesday 1-4 p.m.; Thursday 1-4 p.m.

Manteca Health Center: 124 Sycamore Ave.; (209) 823-7104 or (800) 839-4949.

  • Immunizations: Wednesday 10 a.m.-1 p.m. and 3-6 p.m.
  • Tuberculosis clinic*: first and third Wednesday 3-6 p.m.
  • HIV testing: first Wednesday 1:30-4 p.m.

Lodi Health Center: 300 W. Oak St.; (209) 331-7303 or (800) 839-4949.

  • Immunizations: Friday 8-11 a.m. and 1-4 p.m.
  • Tuberculosis clinic*: Friday 8-11 a.m. and 1-4 p.m.
  • HIV testing: second and fourth Friday 1:30-4 p.m.

WIC (Women, Infants & Children) Program

Does your food budget need a boost? The WIC Program can help you stretch your food dollars. This special supplemental food program for women, infants and children serves low-income women who are currently pregnant or have recently delivered, breastfeeding moms, infants, and children up to age 5. Eligible applicants receive monthly checks to use at any authorized grocery store for wholesome foods such as fruits and vegetables, milk and cheese, whole-grain breads and cereals, and more. WIC shows you how to feed your family to make them healthier and brings moms and babies closer together by helping with breastfeeding. WIC offers referrals to low-cost or free health care and other community services depending on your needs. WIC services may be obtained at a variety of locations throughout San Joaquin County:

Stockton (209) 468-3280

  • Public Health Services WIC Main Office, 1145 N. Hunter St.: Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Wednesday 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.; open two Saturdays a month.
  • Family Health Center, 1414 N. California St.: Wednesday 8 a.m. to noon, 1 to 5 p.m.
  • CUFF (Coalition United for Families), 2044 Fair St.: Thursday 8 a.m. to noon, 1 to 5 p.m.
  • Taylor Family Center, 1101 Lever Blvd.: Wednesday 8 a.m. to noon, 1 to 4 p.m.
  • Transcultural Clinic, 4422 N. Pershing Ave. Suite D-5: Tuesday 8 a.m. to noon, 1 to 5 p.m.

Manteca  (209) 823-7104

  • Public Health Services, 124 Sycamore Lane: Tuesday, Thursday, Friday 8 a.m. to noon, 1 to 5 p.m.

Tracy (209) 831-5930

  • Public Health Services, 205 W. Ninth St.: Monday, Wednesday 8 a.m. to noon, 1 to 5 p.m.

Flu Shots in Calaveras County

Fall brings cooler temperatures and the start of the flu season. Getting flu vaccine early offers greater protection throughout flu season. The Calaveras County Public Health Department recommends everyone 6 months of age and older get flu vaccine every year. Flu season can start as early as October and continue through March. “Seasonal flu can be serious,” said Dr. Dean Kelaita, Calaveras County health officer. “Every year people die from the flu.” Some children, youth and adults are at risk of serious illness and possibly death if they are not protected from the flu. They need to get flu vaccine now.

  • Adults 50 years of age and over.
  • Pregnant women.
  • Children and youth 5-18 years on long-term aspirin therapy.
  • Everyone with chronic health conditions (including diabetes, kidney, heart or lung disease).

If you care for an infant less than 6 months or people with chronic health conditions, you can help protect them by getting your flu vaccine. Even if you had a flu vaccination last year, you need another one this year to be protected and to protect others who are at risk. The Public Health Department will offer five community flu clinics:

  • Every Monday (3 to 5:30 p.m.) and Thursday (8 a.m. to noon): Calaveras County Public Health, 700 Mountain Ranch Road, Suite C2, San Andreas. The monthly Valley Springs Immunization Clinic (third Tuesday, 3 to 5:30 pm) will also offer flu vaccine during flu season.

The flu vaccine is $16.  Medicare Part B is accepted.  No one will be denied service due to inability to pay. For more information about the vaccine or the clinics, contact the Public Health Department at (209) 754-6460 or visit the Public Health website at www.calaveraspublichealth.com.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

What You Need to Know About Joe’s Health Calendar

Have a health-oriented event the public in San Joaquin County should know about? Let me know at jgoldeen@recordnet.com and I’ll get it into my Health Calendar. I’m not interested in promoting commercial enterprises here, but I am interested in helping out nonprofit and/or community groups, hospitals, clinics, physicians and other health-care providers. Look for five categories: Community Events, News, Ongoing, Hospitals & Medical Groups, and Public Health. TO THE PUBLIC: I won’t list an item here from a source that I don’t know or trust. So I believe you can count on what you read here. If there is a problem, please don’t hesitate to let me know at (209) 546-8278 or jgoldeen@recordnet.com. Thanks, Joe

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Joe’s Health Calendar July 1

COMMUNITY EVENTS

Go Lean With Protein in Manteca

July 7 (Tuesday) 4 to 5 p.m.: San Joaquin County Public Health Services is offering free nutrition classes at Manteca Public Library, 320 W. Center St., Manteca. Each week a different topic will be covered, but participants can join at any time and no registration is required. Classes are open to the public and will include free healthy tools and food tastings. You will learn to: prepare new healthy recipes; make your food dollars count; understand food labels; eat more fruits and vegetables; build strong bones; and increase physical activity. Free cookbooks and take-home items. Information: (209) 468-3821. Funded by USDA SNAP-Ed, an equal opportunity provider and employer

Build Strong Bones in East Stockton

July 10 (Friday) noon to 1 p.m.: San Joaquin County Public Health Services is offering free nutrition classes at Health Net Community Center, 678 N. Wilson Way, Suite 16 (Eastland Plaza), Stockton. Each week a different topic will be covered, but participants can join at any time and no registration is required. Classes are open to the public and will include free healthy tools and food tastings. You will learn to: prepare new healthy recipes; make your food dollars count; understand food labels; eat more fruits and vegetables; build strong bones; and increase physical activity. Free cookbooks and take-home items. Information: (209) 468-3821. Funded by USDA SNAP-Ed, an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Make a Change in Manteca

July 14 (Tuesday) 4 to 5 p.m.: San Joaquin County Public Health Services is offering free nutrition classes at Manteca Public Library, 320 W. Center St., Manteca. Each week a different topic will be covered, but participants can join at any time and no registration is required. Classes are open to the public and will include free healthy tools and food tastings. You will learn to: prepare new healthy recipes; make your food dollars count; understand food labels; eat more fruits and vegetables; build strong bones; and increase physical activity. Free cookbooks and take-home items. Information: (209) 468-3821. Funded by USDA SNAP-Ed, an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Go Lean With Protein in East Stockton

July 17 (Friday) noon to 1 p.m.: San Joaquin County Public Health Services is offering free nutrition classes at Health Net Community Center, 678 N. Wilson Way, Suite 16 (Eastland Plaza), Stockton. Each week a different topic will be covered, but participants can join at any time and no registration is required. Classes are open to the public and will include free healthy tools and food tastings. You will learn to: prepare new healthy recipes; make your food dollars count; understand food labels; eat more fruits and vegetables; build strong bones; and increase physical activity. Free cookbooks and take-home items. Information: (209) 468-3821. Funded by USDA SNAP-Ed, an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Healthy Eating Active Living Quarterly Meeting

July 21 (Tuesday) 9 a.m. to noon: This quarter’s meeting at South Sacramento Christian Center, 7710 Stockton Blvd., Sacramento, will explore the Smarter Lunchrooms Movement and the EatFresh.org Resource. Please join us as we share best practices, exchange information and explore mutual interventions and cooperative efforts to provide nutrition and obesity prevention services. Participation is open to anyone interested in working collaboratively to improve the health of communities within the Delta and Gold Country Region of California. Registration is encouraged. CLICK HERE, For more information, please contact Lara Falkenstein.

Celebrate – Eat Smart in Manteca

July 21 (Tuesday) 4 to 5 p.m.: San Joaquin County Public Health Services is offering free nutrition classes at Manteca Public Library, 320 W. Center St., Manteca. Each week a different topic will be covered, but participants can join at any time and no registration is required. Classes are open to the public and will include free healthy tools and food tastings. You will learn to: prepare new healthy recipes; make your food dollars count; understand food labels; eat more fruits and vegetables; build strong bones; and increase physical activity. Free cookbooks and take-home items. Information: (209) 468-3821. Funded by USDA SNAP-Ed, an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Make a Change in East Stockton

July 24 (Friday) noon to 1 p.m.: San Joaquin County Public Health Services is offering free nutrition classes at Health Net Community Center, 678 N. Wilson Way, Suite 16 (Eastland Plaza), Stockton. Each week a different topic will be covered, but participants can join at any time and no registration is required. Classes are open to the public and will include free healthy tools and food tastings. You will learn to: prepare new healthy recipes; make your food dollars count; understand food labels; eat more fruits and vegetables; build strong bones; and increase physical activity. Free cookbooks and take-home items. Information: (209) 468-3821. Funded by USDA SNAP-Ed, an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Celebrate – Eat Smart in East Stockton

July 31 (Friday) noon to 1 p.m.: San Joaquin County Public Health Services is offering free nutrition classes at Health Net Community Center, 678 N. Wilson Way, Suite 16 (Eastland Plaza), Stockton. Each week a different topic will be covered, but participants can join at any time and no registration is required. Classes are open to the public and will include free healthy tools and food tastings. You will learn to: prepare new healthy recipes; make your food dollars count; understand food labels; eat more fruits and vegetables; build strong bones; and increase physical activity. Free cookbooks and take-home items. Information: (209) 468-3821. Funded by USDA SNAP-Ed, an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Free Health & Vision Fair in Stockton

Sept. 18 (Friday) 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.: The eighth annual Health & Vision Fair sponsored by the Community Center for the Blind, 130 W. Flora St., Stockton, will offer free vision screenings, hearing evaluations, blood pressure checks, goodies and giveaways. Bring your family. Many of Stockton’s resources and agencies will be represented. The Lions’ Eye Mobile will be on site. Information: (209) 466-3836.

Celebration on Central (Lodi) for Bi-National Health Week

Sept. 27 (Sunday) 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.: Up to 60 agencies will be providing information, free health screenings, arts and crafts activities, face painting, amusing clowns, free food, live entertainment, raffle prizes and agencies interacting with children and families at the Celebration on Central at Joe Serna Jr. Charter School, 29 S. Central Ave., Lodi.

Free Multicultural Health and Community Fair in Stockton

Oct. 10 (Saturday) 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.: West Lane Oaks Family Resource Center, part of the Community Partnership for Families of San Joaquin County, is planning its eighth Annual Multicultural Health and Community Fair at the Normandy Village Shopping Center, northeast corner of Hammer and West lanes, Stockton, in the parking lot adjacent to Carl’s Jr. We hope that you can join us this year and help to make our event a success. The goal of the Multicultural Health and Community Fair is to educate the community on where and how to find resources and programs through the various agencies in attendance and to celebrate our cultural diversity. Over 50 agencies participated at last year’s event. These agencies, such as social service agencies, health providers and financial planning, provided free services and assisted families with their various needs. We also provided activities for children. Over 600 families attended our event last year, and this year we hope to attract more than 1,000 families. Information: (209) 644-8619.

Celebrate Care Givers With an Inner Safari

Nov. 14 (Saturday) 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.: Healings in Motion presents its annual day to honor and recognize care givers: An Inner Safari – A Joyful Day to Relax, Retool and Renew. Event will be held at Robert Cabral Agricultural Center, 2101 E. Earhart Drive, Stockton. Information and registration: Click here.

CareVan Offers Free Mobile Health Clinic

St. Joseph’s Medical Center CareVan offers a free health clinic for low-income and no-insurance individuals or families, 16 years old and older. Mobile health care services will be available to handle most minor urgent health care needs such as mild burns, bumps, abrasions, sprains, sinus and urinary tract infections, cold and flu. No narcotics prescriptions will be available. Information: (209) 461-3471 or www.StJosephsCares.org/CarevanClinic schedule is subject to change without notice. Walk-In appointments are available.

  • Tuesdays 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.: Dollar General, 310 W. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., Stockton.
  • Wednesdays & Thursdays 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.: For those 16 and older only; San Joaquin County Fairgrounds, 1658 S. Airport Way, Stockton.

ER Wait Watcher: Which ER Will See You the Fastest?

Heading to the emergency room? ProPublica provides a great tool to help. You may wait a while before a doctor or other treating professional sees you — and the hospital nearest to you might not be the one that sees you the fastest. Click here to look up average ER wait times, as reported by hospitals to the federal government, as well as the time it takes to get there in current traffic, as reported by Google.

Farmers Markets In San Joaquin County

San Joaquin County Public Health Services Network for a Healthy California program has developed a list of San Joaquin County Farmers Markets as part of its goal to increase fruit and vegetable consumption. Click here for the latest list of farmers markets around San Joaquin County, including times and locations.

NEWS

Need Help in San Joaquin County? Call 2-1-1

Have no money for food? Just lost your job? Sick and need a health clinic? Depressed? How do I file taxes? Call 2-1-1 for help. Click here for the flier.

AMA Strengthens Youth Policy on E-Cigarettes

With the growing popularity of electronic cigarettes among the nation’s youth, the American Medical Association (AMA) adopted new policy to further strengthen its support of regulatory oversight of electronic cigarettes. The policy calls for the passage of laws and regulations that would: set the minimum legal purchase age for electronic cigarettes and their liquid nicotine refills at 21 years old; require liquid nicotine to be packaged in child-resistant containers; and urge strict enforcement of laws prohibiting the sale of tobacco products to minors. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s 2014 National Youth Tobacco Survey, e-cigarette use among middle and high school students tripled from 2013 to 2014. The survey data showed e-cigarette use among high school students increased from 4.5 percent in 2013 to 13.4 percent in 2014 – an increase from approximately 660,000 to 2 million students. Among middle school students, the data indicated that e-cigarette use more than tripled from 1.1 percent in 2013 to 3.9 percent in 2014 – an increase from approximately 120,000 to 450,000 students. “The AMA continues to advocate for more stringent policies to protect our country’s youth from the dangers of tobacco use and improve public health. The AMA’s newest policy expands on the AMA’s longtime efforts to help keep all tobacco products, including electronic cigarettes, out of the hands of young people, by urging laws to deter the sale of electronic cigarettes to anyone under the age of 21,” AMA President Dr. Robert Wah said. “We also urge the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to act now to implement its proposed rule to effectively regulate electronic cigarettes.” The new policy extends existing AMA policy adopted in 2013 and 2014 calling for all electronic cigarettes to be subject to the same regulations and oversight that the FDA applies to tobacco and nicotine products, seeking tighter marketing restrictions on manufacturers, and prohibiting claims that electronic cigarettes are effective tobacco cessation tools. “Improving the health of the nation is AMA’s top priority and we will continue to advocate for policies that help reduce the burden of preventable diseases like cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes, both of which can be linked to smoking,” Wah said.

Valley Children’s, Stanford Partner on Pediatric Programs

Valley Children’s Healthcare of Madera and Stanford University School of Medicine will partner to create a graduate medical education program based at Valley Children’s Hospital. “Valley Children’s is taking the lead in training the next generation of pediatricians and pediatric surgical and medical specialists,” said Dr. David Christensen, Valley Children’s chief medical officer. “With Stanford as our academic partner, we’ll prepare doctors to continue providing the highest quality medical care for children.” The “Valley Children’s Pediatric Residency Program, Affiliated with Stanford University School of Medicine” will allow Valley Children’s residents to have rotations and learning opportunities at the Palo Alto campus and for Stanford’s residents to learn here. The fellowship program at Valley Children’s will be the first of its kind in the Valley. It will train doctors to become pediatric subspecialists, building on the highest quality of exceptional care in service lines like pediatric surgery, gastroenterology and emergency medicine. “We are excited about the opportunity to partner with Valley Children’s in the creation of a new, pediatric-focused teaching program in Central California and for our current residents and fellows to rotate at Valley Children’s,” said Dr. Lloyd Minor, dean of the Stanford University School of Medicine. “Valley Children’s is one of the largest children’s hospitals in California and has the state’s busiest emergency department for patients younger than 21 years of age. By spending time there, our residents will have the opportunity to see a wide variety of complex and critically ill patients in a short period of time.” A unique aspect of the Pediatric Residency and Fellowship programs will be Valley Children’s partnership with hospitals and medical groups throughout the area. Valley Children’s residents and fellows will have the opportunity for rotations at partner locations – including Kaiser Permanente and Saint Agnes Medical Center in Fresno and Dignity Health – and local pediatricians’ offices. “These relationships are key to the success of our program,” said Valley Children’s President and CEO Todd Suntrapak. “One of our goals is to attract pediatricians and subspecialists to our area and keep them here. That means more Valley families will have access to the care they need, right where they live. One of the best ways we can do this is by exposing our residents and fellows to the diverse practice opportunities that exist in the Central Valley. We are grateful that so many groups are committed to helping Valley Children’s train the next generation of pediatricians and pediatric specialists.” Leading the new program is Valley Children’s Chief of Pediatrics Dr. Jolie Limon. Limon joined Valley Children’s as a pediatric hospitalist in 2000. She has won numerous teaching awards during her tenure and her areas of expertise include resident leadership and interprofessional education. “This is an exciting time,” Limon said. “I look forward to building a program that not only trains exceptional pediatricians but also creates future leaders in pediatric care for the Valley. Valley Children’s Hospital has a wealth of wonderful clinicians, educators and patients by which to sustain an amazing training program.” Valley Children’s Hospital will continue to serve as a teaching site for more than 190 residents and medical students in a dozen other programs, including those based at Kaweah Delta Health Care District in Visalia, Mercy Medical Center in Merced and Clinica Sierra Vista in Fresno.

California Endowment Unveils New Website

The California Endowment, the state’s largest health foundation, today unveiled its new website – designed to bring more tools and features to its users, and allowing The Endowment to better connect with its many partner organizations, as well as thought leaders and the people of California. “Our new site is an important engine to support The Endowment’s work to transform communities across California, and improve the fundamental health status of all Californians,” said Dr. Robert Ross, M.D., chief executive officer. “The site’s new features allow us to reach more people and ultimately help realize more change throughout California.” The website offers a fresh design and fully integrates with today’s digital environment. It’s mobile friendly and easily accessible with new tools, interactive graphics, timely information and links to The Endowment’s social media platforms. Please visit the site at www.calendow.org.

Top Chronic Conditions: 11 Million and Counting

 SEE THE REPORT

GET THE CHARTS

Chronic conditions are the leading cause of death and disability in the United States, and the biggest contributor to health care costs. But there is wide variation in their incidence, with major differences depending on age, income, race and ethnicity, and insurance status. In addition, many Californians with chronic conditions are delaying needed care because of cost. Californians with the Top Chronic Conditions: 11 Million and Counting looks at five major chronic conditions — asthma, diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure, and serious psychological distress — and how each of these affects Californians. Among the key findings:

  • About 40% of adults reported having at least one of the five chronic conditions studied.
  • High blood pressure is the most common chronic condition, affecting about one in four, or 7.6 million, adults in California.
  • As income rises, the prevalence of chronic conditions falls. Adults living under 138% of the federal poverty level were more likely to have two or more chronic conditions (14%) than those in the highest income group, 400%+ of the federal poverty level (8%).
  • Of Californians with psychological distress, 34% delayed needed medical care, and 27% delayed filling prescriptions. Cost or lack of insurance was frequently cited as the reason for these delays.
  • Of Californians age 65 or older, 70% have at least one chronic condition, compared to 26% of those age 18 to 39.

See the complete report and charts now.

This report is published as part of the CHCF California Health Care Almanac, an online clearinghouse for key data and analysis examining California’s health care marketplace. Find all Almanac reports at www.chcf.org/almanac.

Resources to Help You Better Understand Stem Cell Science

The International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) has launched an expanded “Closer Look at Stem Cells” website www.closerlookatstemcells.org , an online resource to help patients and their families make informed decisions about stem cell treatments, clinics and their health. The ISSCR, a global membership-based organization comprised of approximately 4,000 stem cell researchers, clinicians and ethicists, is concerned that stem cell treatments are being marketed by clinics around the world without appropriate oversight and patient protections in place to ensure safety and likely benefit. New resources on the website emphasize key scientific principles and practices that will help the public to better evaluate treatment claims. “The ‘Closer Look at Stem Cells’ website is a direct channel from researchers to the public,” said Megan Munsie, a scientist with Stem Cells Australia and chairperson of the ISSCR task force responsible for the website expansion. “Promising clinical trials are under way for many diseases and conditions, but most stem cell-based treatments are still in the future. We hope that the website will foster interest and excitement in the science, but also an understanding of the current limitations of stem cells as medicine and a healthy skepticism of clinics selling treatments.” The website, once patient focused, is now a comprehensive destination for those interested in stem cell science and research being conducted across the globe. It includes informational pages on basic stem cell biology, the process by which science becomes medicine, clinical trials and the use of stem cells in understanding specific health conditions – macular degeneration, multiple sclerosis, heart disease and diabetes. Pages on other conditions will be added in the coming months. It is also home to the “Stem Cells in Focus” blog, which seeks to make cutting-edge research from the stem cell field accessible to non-scientists. “I am often contacted by patients struggling with very difficult decisions about their health, and who want to know more about the potential of stem cells,” said Larry Goldstein, a stem cell scientist at the University of California, San Diego and a member of the ISSCR task force responsible for the website expansion. “My experience is that understanding the current state of stem cell science and medicine is key to making informed decisions about stem cell treatments, and so I encourage patients to start their journey on the ‘Closer Look at Stem Cells’ website.”

California Debuts Ads to Counter E-Cigarettes

Twenty-five years after launching the first anti-smoking advertisements in the state, the California Department of Public Health on March 23 premiered a series of television, digital, and outdoor ads in a new campaign called “Wake Up,” as part of its educational effort to inform the public about the dangers of e-cigarettes. “California has been a world leader in tobacco use prevention and cessation since 1990, with one of the lowest youth and adult smoking rates in the nation. The aggressive marketing and escalating use of e-cigarettes threatens to erode that progress,” said Dr. Karen Smith, newly appointed CDPH director and state health officer. CDPH recently released a report and health advisory highlighting areas of concern regarding e-cigarettes, including the sharp rise in e-cigarette use among California teens and young adults, the highly addictive nature of nicotine in e-cigarettes, the surge in accidental nicotine poisonings occurring in young children, and that secondhand e-cigarette emissions contain several toxic chemicals. Research shows that youth and young adults who use e-cigarettes are far more likely to also use traditional cigarettes and other tobacco products. “Our advertising campaign is telling the public to ‘wake up’ to the fact that these are highly addictive products being mass marketed,” said Dr. Smith. The advertising campaign includes two television ads that feature songs from the 1950s and ‘60s and images portraying the health risks of e-cigarettes. One TV ad underscores the e-cigarette industry’s use of candy flavored ‘e-juice’ and products that entice the next generation to become addicted to nicotine. The second TV spot emphasizes the dangers and addictiveness of e-cigarettes, while exposing the fact that big tobacco companies are in the e-cigarette business. E-cigarettes are largely unregulated at the federal level and companies are not required to disclose what is in their products or how they are made. To inform the public about the dangers of e-cigarettes, CDPH launched an educational campaign in late January. The advertising component kicked off on March 23 and runs through June 2015, with TV and digital ads on websites, online radio and social media throughout the state. Outdoor ads, including billboards, at gas stations and in malls, and ads in movie theaters will be phased in throughout the campaign. This counter e-cigarette advertising campaign is part of CDPH’s ongoing anti- tobacco media efforts. In addition to the advertising, the CDPH educational campaign will include:

  • Partnering with the local public health, medical, and child care organizations to increase awareness about the known toxicity of e-cigarettes and the high risk of poisonings, especially to children, while continuing to promote and support the use of proven effective cessation therapies.
  • Joining with the California Department of Education and school officials to assist in providing accurate information to parents, students, teachers, and school administrators on the dangers of e-cigarettes.

The California Tobacco Control Program was established by the Tobacco Tax and Health Protection Act of 1988. The act, approved by California voters, instituted a 25-cent tax on each pack of cigarettes and earmarked 5 cents of that tax to fund California’s tobacco control efforts. These efforts include supporting local health departments and community organizations, a media campaign, and evaluation and surveillance. California’s comprehensive approach has changed social norms around tobacco use and secondhand smoke. California’s tobacco control efforts have reduced both adult and youth smoking rates by 50 percent, saved more than 1 million lives and have resulted in $134 billion worth of savings in health care costs. Learn more at TobaccoFreeCA.com.

Manteca Unified Students Learn Hands-Only CPR

Knowing the importance of quick action upon a person experiencing sudden cardiac arrest, the hands-only CPR push was created by Manteca Unified School District Health Services’ Caroline Thibodeau and Secondary Education’s Tevani Liotard along with Manteca District Ambulance Service’s Jonathan Mendoza. Other agencies who take part are Manteca Fire Department, Lathrop-Manteca Fire Department and Stockton Fire Department. The group has presented a hands-Only CPR lecture and hands-on demonstration to all MUSD ninth-grade students. The lecture and presentation has been used throughout the MUSD high schools over the past 16 months. A total of 2,794 students and 73 adults have been taught the hands-only CPR to date. By the end of the school year, the number will increase to more than 3,500 students. All students get to experience hands-on by doing chest compression on a mannequin plus hearing and seeing the importance of quickly starting hands- only CPR quickly till help arrives. Paramedics, firefighters and teachers assist the students during the mannequin chest compression portion.  a majority of the students say, “Doing chest compressions is harder than I thought, but, I now feel I can do it or tell someone how to do it.” In December, a student at Manteca High School collapsed in the middle of class experiencing a sudden cardiac arrest.  Due to the quick action of the vice principal, Manteca Police Department resource officer, Manteca District Ambulance EMTs and paramedics, Manteca firefighters and continuous care at St. Joseph’s Medical Center and Stanford Hospital, this student is alive and has fully recovered.

Comprehensive Website Aims to Reduce Health Disparities

Welltopia, a new website launched by the California Department of Health Care Services and the UC Davis Institute for Population Health Improvement, offers a wide range of essential resources to help Californians, especially those on limited incomes, build healthier lives and communities. Designed to complement the popularWelltopia by DHCS Facebook page, the new website at MyWelltopia.com serves as a comprehensive resource connecting individuals, families and communities to credible information that addresses the social determinants of health and other leading causes of preventable death. Many studies have shown that access to health care, education, employment, housing, nutritious foods and physical activity are among the fundamental drivers of health for individuals and their communities. Making reliable information and resources available for people of all ages is key to creating healthy environments. “We developed Welltopia to be a convenient and trusted source of information covering all three aspects of health — physical, mental and well-being,” said Neal Kohatsu, DHCS medical director. “We’ve made every effort to ensure that the resources are both accurate and accessible to consumers.” The Welltopia site organizes information into five categories — Well Body, Well Mind, Jobs & Training, Health Insurance, and Basic Needs. It includes information on nutrition, physical activity, smoking cessation, alcohol- and drug-abuse prevention, stress management, health insurance, residency and social services, among others. The site also contains videos, photos and graphics with information about health-related programs. There are free applications, such as fitness trackers, women’s health information, recipes and food journals to track daily calorie intake, and links to CalFresh, education, job placement resources and other social services. “Welltopia should be the first stop for persons seeking reliable information about the many determinants of health,” said Kenneth Kizer, IPHI director. “Its friendly format quickly guides users to practical and trustworthy sources.” The Department of Health Care Services manages California’s form of Medicaid, known as Medi-Cal, which helps millions of low-income Californians obtain access to affordable, high-quality health care, including medical, dental, mental health, substance use disorder services, and long-term services and supports. DHCS aims to preserve and improve the health of all Californians. The UC Davis Institute for Population Health Improvement fosters population health within the UC Davis Health System and communities throughout the state. IPHI’s mission is to create, apply and disseminate knowledge about the many determinants of health to improve health and health security, and to support activities that improve health equity and eliminate health disparities.

Protect Your Family From E-Cigarettes

Read some facts from the California Department of Public Health. To learn more, click here.

HICAP Seeking Volunteers to Counsel Seniors on Medicare

HICAP – the Health Insurance Counseling and Advocacy Program – is a nonprofit organization dedicated to helping Medicare beneficiaries navigate the Medicare maze.  We do this in one-on-one counseling sessions, with registered HICAP volunteer counselors. HICAP counselors help Medicare beneficiaries: understand Medicare; compare supplemental policies; review HMO and PPO benefits; learn about government assistance programs; prepare appeals and challenge denials, and clarify rights as a health care consumer.  Our services are always free and always unbiased.  We neither sell nor recommend specific insurance companies.  Rather, we educate beneficiaries to make the choice best for their needs. We are looking for energetic seniors who are computer-savvy, interested in learning, and good communicators.  We will conduct training in San Joaquin County soon.  If you are interested in learning more about HICAP volunteering, contact HICAP at (209) 470-7812.

Breastfeeding and Working

The Breastfeeding Coalition of San Joaquin County offers its “Working & Breastfeeding” Toolkit at BreastfeedSJC.org. This toolkit contains tips, answers to frequently asked questions and links to online resources for families and employers. Jump on over to BreastfeedSJC.org/Working-and-Breastfeeding to check it out.

Diabetes Resources in San Joaquin County

Diabetes is a costly disease, both in terms of people’s health and well-being, and in terms of dollars spent on treatment, medications and lost days at work and school. San Joaquin County annually accounts for among the worst death rates from diabetes among all 58 California counties. In an attempt to make its estimated 60,000 residents with diabetes aware of the many local resources available to help them deal with the disease, a dozen billboards in English and Spanish have been posted around the county directing readers to the UniteForDiabetesSJC.org website. At that website is information on numerous free classes and programs that provide education and training on preventing diabetes, managing the disease, controlling its side effects, and links to more resources, including special events and finding a physician. For questions on how to navigate the website or find a class, residents may call Vanessa Armendariz, community project manager at the San Joaquin Medical Society, at(209) 952-5299. The billboards came about through the efforts of the Diabetes Work Group, a subcommittee of San Joaquin County Public Health’s Obesity and Chronic Disease Prevention Task Force. Funding was provided through a grant from Kaiser Permanente Community Benefit Programs Division-Central Valley Area.

Senior Gateway Website: Don’t Be a Victim

California Insurance Commissioner Dave Jones has unveiled a new consumer protection tool for California seniors, who have traditionally been prime targets for con artists. The California Department of Insurance (CDI) is hosting a new Web site www.seniors.ca.gov to educate seniors and their advocates and provide helpful information about how to avoid becoming victims of personal or financial abuse. The Web site, called Senior Gateway, is important because seniors, including older veterans, are disproportionately at risk of being preyed upon financially and subjected to neglect and abuse. The Senior Gateway is sponsored by the Elder Financial Abuse Interagency Roundtable (E-FAIR), convened by CDI and includes representatives from many California agencies who share a common purpose of safeguarding the welfare of California’s seniors. “The goal of this collaborative effort is to assemble, in one convenient location, valuable information not only for seniors, but their families and caregivers. This site will help California seniors find resources and solve problems, and will enable participating agencies to better serve this important segment of our population,” Jones said. The site offers seniors valuable tips and resources in the following areas, and more:

  • Avoiding and reporting abuse and neglect by in-home caregivers or in facilities; learn about different types of abuse and the warning signs.
  • Preventing and reporting financial fraud, abuse and scams targeting seniors.
  • Understanding health care, insurance, Medicare and long-term care; know what long-term care includes.
  • Locating services and programs available to assist older adults.
  • Knowing your rights before buying insurance; what seniors need to know about annuities.
  • Investing wisely and understanding the ins and outs of reverse mortgages.

$5,000 Grants Help Pay for Children’s Medical Expenses

UnitedHealthcare Children’s Foundation (UHCCF) is seeking grant applications from families in need of financial assistance to help pay for their child’s health care treatments, services or equipment not covered, or not fully covered, by their commercial health insurance plan. Qualifying families can receive up to $5,000 to help pay for medical services and equipment such as physical, occupational and speech therapy, counseling services, surgeries, prescriptions, wheelchairs, orthotics, eyeglasses and hearing aids. To be eligible for a grant, children must be 16 years of age or younger. Families must meet economic guidelines, reside in the United States and have a commercial health insurance plan. Grants are available for medical expenses families have incurred 60 days prior to the date of application as well as for ongoing and future medical needs. Parents or legal guardians may apply for grants at www.uhccf.org, and there is no application deadline. Organizations or private donors can make tax-deductible donations to the foundation at this website. In 2011, UHCCF awarded more than 1,200 grants to families across the United States for treatments associated with medical conditions such as cancer, spina bifida, muscular dystrophy, diabetes, hearing loss, autism, cystic fibrosis, Down syndrome, ADHD and cerebral palsy.

Facts About Fruits and Vegetables

Click here for lots of great information about fruits and vegetables.

ONGOING

Cambodian and Hmong Language Diabetes Classes

The Cambodian and Hmong communities of Stockton are invited to attend free diabetes classes presented in the Khmer and Hmong languages. Call Jou Moua at (209) 298-2374 or (209) 461-3224 to find a class.

Fit Families for Life

Fit Families for Life is a weekly class for parents offered by HealthNet and held at Fathers and Families of San Joaquin, 338 E. Market St., Stockton. All parents are welcome and there is no cost to attend. Participants will learn about nutrition, cooking and exercise. Information and registration: Renee Garcia at (209) 941-0701.

Journey to Control Diabetes Education Program

Mondays 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.: Dameron Hospital offers a free diabetes education program, with classes held in the Dameron Hospital Annex, 445 W. Acacia St., Stockton. Preregistration is required. Contact Carolyn Sanders, RN, at c.sanders@dameronhospital.org(209) 461-3136 or (209) 461-7597.

Al-Anon Freedom to Change Support Group

Mondays and Thursdays 7 to 8:30 p.m.: Lodi Health offers Al-Anon Freedom to Change meetings for family and friends of problem drinkers. The group helps people to know what to do when someone close to them drinks too much. Meetings are offered several times each month at Lodi Memorial Hospital, 975 S. Fairmont Ave., Lodi. Information: www.lodihealth.org.

Man-to-Man Prostate Cancer Support Group

First Monday of Month 7 to 9 p.m.: Dameron Hospital, 525 W. Acacia St., Stockton, holds a support group for men diagnosed with prostate cancer and their families and caregivers. The meetings are facilitated by trained volunteers who are prostate cancer survivors. Information: Ernest Pontiflet at (209) 952-9092.

Crystal Meth Anonymous Recovery Group

Mondays 6:30 p.m.: 825 Central Ave., Lodi. Information: (209) 430-9780 or (209) 368-0756.

Yoga for People Dealing with Cancer

Mondays 5:30 to 7 p.m.: This free weekly Yoga & Breathing class for cancer patients will help individuals sleep better and reduce pain. This class is led by yoga instructor Chinu Mehdi in Classrooms 1 and 2, St. Joseph’s Medical Center, 1800 N. California St., Stockton. Information: (209) 467-6550 orSJCancerInfo@dignityhealth.org.

Respiratory Support Group for Better Breathing

First Tuesday of month 10 to 11 a.m.: Lodi Health’s Respiratory Therapy Department and the American Lung Association of California Valley Lode offer a free “Better Breathers’” respiratory-support group for people and their family members with breathing problems including asthma, bronchitis and emphysema. Participants will learn how to cope with chronic lung disease, understand lungs and how they work and use medications and oxygen properly. The group meets at Lodi Health West, 800 S. Lower Sacramento Road, Lodi. Pre-registration is recommended by calling (209) 339-7445. For information on other classes available at Lodi Memorial, visit its website at www.lodihealth.org.

The Beat Goes On Cardiac Support Group

First Tuesday of month 11 a.m. to noon: Lodi Health offers a free cardiac support group at Lodi Health West, 800 S. Lower Sacramento Road, Lodi. “The Beat Goes On” cardiac support group is a community-based nonprofit group that offers practical tools for healthy living to heart disease patients, their families and caregivers. Its mission is to provide community awareness that those with heart disease can live well through support meetings and educational forums. Upcoming topics include exercise, stress management and nutrition counseling services. All are welcomed to attend. Information: (209) 339-7664.

Planned Childbirth Services

Tuesdays 6 to 8 p.m.: Dameron Hospital, 525 W. Acacia St., Stockton, hosts a four-class series which answers questions and prepares mom and her partner for labor and birth. Bring two pillows and a comfortable blanket or exercise mat to each class. These classes are requested during expecting mother’s third trimester. Information/registration: Carolyn Sanders, RN (209) 461-3136 or www.Dameronhospital.org.

Lactation Support Group in Lodi

Tuesdays 10 a.m.: Lodi Health offers The Lactation Club, a support group for breastfeeding moms that is held in Classroom A at Lodi Memorial Hospital, 975 S. Fairmont Ave., Lodi. Lactation consultants are readily available to answer questions and help with breastfeeding issues. A scale will also be on hand to weigh babies. Information: (209) 339.7872 or www.lodihealth.org.

Say Yes to Breastfeeding

Tuesdays 6 to 8 p.m.: Dameron Hospital, 525 W. Acacia St., Stockton, offers a class that outlines the information and basic benefits and risk management of breastfeeding. Topics include latching, early skin-to-skin on cue, expressing milk and helpful hints on early infant feeding. In addition, the hospital offers a monthly Mommy and Me-Breastfeeding support group where mothers, babies and hospital clerical staff meet the second Monday of each month. Information/registration: Carolyn Sanders, RN (209) 461-3136 or www.Dameronhospital.org.

Precious Preemies

Second Tuesday of the month, 9:30 to 10:30 a.m.: Precious Preemies: A Discussion Group for Families Raising Premature Infants and Infants with Medical Concerns required registration and is held at Family Resource Network, Sherwood Executive Center, 5250 Claremont Ave., Suite 148, Stockton. Information: www.frcn.org/calendar.asp or (209) 472-3674 or (800) 847-3030.

Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous

Are you having trouble controlling the way you eat? Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous (FA) is a free Twelve Step recovery program for anyone suffering from food obsession, overeating, undereating or bulimia. For more information or a list of additional meetings throughout the U.S. and the world, call (781) 932-6300 or visitwww.foodaddicts.org.

  • Tuesdays 7 p.m.: Modesto Unity Church, 2547 Veneman Ave., Modesto.
  • Wednesdays 9 a.m.: The Episcopal Church of Saint Anne, 1020 W. Lincoln Road, Stockton.
  • Saturdays 9 a.m.: Tracy Community Church, 1790 Sequoia Blvd. at Corral Hollow, Tracy.

Diabetes: Basics to a Healthy Life

Wednesdays 10 a.m.: Free eight-class ongoing series every Wednesday except the month of September. Click here for detailsSt. Joseph’s Medical Center, Cleveland Classroom, 2102 N. California St., Stockton. Information: (209) 944-8355 or www.StJosephsCares.org/Diabetes.

Break From Stress

Wednesdays 6 to 7 p.m.: St. Joseph’s Medical Center offers the community a break from their stressful lives with Break from Stress sessions. These sessions are free, open to the public, with no pre-registration necessary. Just drop in, take a deep breath and relax through a variety of techniques. Break from Stress sessions are held in St. Joseph’s Cleveland Classroom (behind HealthCare Clinical Lab on California Street just north of the medical center. Information: SJCancerInfo@DignityHealth.org or (209) 467-6550.

Mother-Baby Breast Connection

Wednesdays 1 to 3 p.m.: Join a lactation consultant for support and advice on the challenges of early breastfeeding. Come meet other families and attend as often as you like. A different topic of interest will be offered each week with time for breastfeeding assistance and questions. Pre-registration is required. Call (209) 467-6331. St. Joseph’s Medical Center, Pavilion Conference Room (1st floor), 1800 N. California St., Stockton.

Adult Children With Aging Relatives

Second Wednesday of month 4:30 p.m.: Lodi Health offers an Adult Children with Aging Relatives support group at the Hutchins Street Square Senior Center. Information: (209) 369-4443 or (209) 369-6921.

Diabetes Support Group in Stockton

Third Wednesday of month 5:30 to 7 p.m.: This support group will help you deal with issues of diabetes through avoiding lifelong complications. Accomplished by increasing daily activities, learning to take your medications  properly, and overcoming depression, frustration and feeling alone. Each month there will be resources including dietitians, doctors, pharmacists and literature is available to assist you. Knowledge is power. This is a free program (no registration is required). Monthly meetings will be held at St. Joseph’s Medical Center, 1800 N. California St., Stockton, in the basement Classroom 3. Any questions or comments call Susan Sanchez, RN, Certified Diabetes Educator: (209) 662-9487.

Smoking Cessation Class in Lodi

Wednesdays 3 to 4 p.m.: Lodi Health offers an eight-session smoking-cessation class for those wishing to become smoke free. Classes are held weekly in the Lodi Health Pulmonary Rehabilitation Department at Lodi Memorial Hospital, 975 S. Fairmont Ave., Lodi. Topics covered include benefits of quitting; ways to cope with quitting; how to deal with a craving; medications that help with withdrawal; and creating a support system. Call the Lodi Health Lung Health Line at (209) 339-7445 to register.

Individual Stork Tours At Dameron

Wednesdays 5 to 7 p.m.: Dameron Hospital, 525 W. Acacia St., Stockton, offers 30 minute guided tours that provide expecting parents with a tour of Labor/Delivery, the Mother-Baby Unit and an overview of the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. New mothers are provided information on delivery services, where to go and what to do once delivery has arrived, and each mother can create an individual birthing plan. Information/registration: Carolyn Sanders, RN (209) 461-3136or www.Dameronhospital.org.

Brain Builders Weekly Program

Thursdays 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.: Lodi Health and the Hutchins Street Square Senior Center offer “Brain Builders,” a weekly program for people in the early stages of memory loss. There is a weekly fee of $25. Registration is required. Information or to register, call (209) 369-4443 or (209) 369-6921.

Infant CPR and Safety

Second Thursday of month 5 to 7 p.m.: Dameron Hospital, 525 W. Acacia St., Stockton, offers a class to family members to safely take care of their newborn.  Family members are taught infant CPR and relief of choking, safe sleep and car seat safety.  Regarding infant safety, the hospital offers on the fourth Thursday of each month from 5 to 7 p.m. a NICU/SCN family support group. This group is facilitated by a Master Prepared Clinical Social Worker and the Dameron NICU staff with visits from the hospital’s neonatologist. Information/registration: Carolyn Sanders, RN (209) 461-3136 or www.Dameronhospital.org.

Group Meetings for Alzheimer’s Patients, Caregivers

Thursdays 10 to 11:30 a.m.: The Alzheimer’s Aid Society of Northern California in conjunction with Villa Marche residential care facility conducts a simultaneous Caregiver’s Support Group and Patient’s Support Group at Villa Marche, 1119 Rosemarie Lane, Stockton. Caregivers, support people or family members of anyone with dementia are welcome to attend the caregiver’s group, led by Rita Vasquez. It’s a place to listen, learn and share. At the same time, Alzheimer’s and dementia patients can attend the patient’s group led by Sheryl Ashby. Participants will learn more about dementia and how to keep and enjoy the skills that each individual possesses. There will be brain exercises and reminiscence. The meeting is appropriate for anyone who enjoys socialization and is able to attend with moderate supervision. Information: (209) 477-4858.

Clase Gratuita de Diabetes en Español

Cada segundo Viernes del mes: Participantes aprenderán los fundamentos sobre la observación de azúcar de sangre, comida saludable, tamaños de porción y medicaciones. Un educador con certificado del control de diabetes dará instruccion sobre la autodirección durante de esta clase. Para mas información y registración:(209) 944-8355. Aprenda más de los programas de diabetes en el sitio electronico de St. Joseph’s: www.StJosephsCares.org/Diabetes

Nutrition on the Move Class

Fridays 11 a.m. to noon: Nutrition Education Center at Emergency Food Bank, 7 W. Scotts Ave., Stockton.  Free classes are general nutrition classes where you’ll learn about the new My Plate standards, food label reading, nutrition and exercise, eating more fruits and vegetables, and other tips. Information: (209) 464-7369or www.stocktonfoodbank.org.

Crystal Meth Anonymous Recovery Group

Fridays 6 p.m.: St. Joseph’s Behavioral Health (in trailer at the rear of building), 2510 N. California St., Stockton. Information: (209) 461-2000.

Free Diabetes Class in Spanish

Second Friday of every month: Participants will learn the basics about blood sugar monitoring, healthy foods, portion sizes, medications and self-management skills from a certified diabetic educator during this free class. St. Joseph’s Medical Center, 1800 N. California St., Stockton. Information and registration: (209) 944-8355. Learn more on St. Joseph’s diabetes programs at www.StJosephsCares.org/Diabetes.

National Alliance on Mental Health: Family-to-Family Education

Saturdays 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.: NAMI presents a free series of 12 weekly education classes for friends and family of people with major depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder, borderline personality disorder, panic disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, and co-occurring brain disorders. Classes will be held at 530 W. Acacia St., Stockton (across from Dameron Hospital) on the second floor. Information or to register: (209) 468-3755.

Multiple Sclerosis Self-Help Group

Second Saturday of Every Month 10 a.m. to noon: Multiple Sclerosis Self-Help Group meeting are for family, friends, caregivers and individuals with multiple sclerosis. We invite you to join us for a few moments of exchanging ideas and management skills to help you live and work with multiple sclerosis, a chronic disease. Meetings are at St. Joseph’s Medical Center, 1800 N. California St., Stockton, in Classroom 1 in the basement. Information: Laurie (209) 915-1730 or Velma (209) 951-2264.

All Day Prepared Childbirth Class

Third Saturday of month 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.: Dameron Hospital, 525 W. Acacia St., Stockton, offers community service educational class of prebirth education and mentoring. Information/registration: Carolyn Sanders, RN (209) 461-3136 or www.Dameronhospital.org.

Big Brother/Big Sister

Second Sunday of month: Dameron Hospital, 525 W. Acacia St., Stockton, has a one-hour class meeting designed specifically for newborn’s siblings. Topics include family role, a labor/delivery tour and a video presentation which explains hand washing/germ control and other household hygiene activities. This community service class ends with a Certification of Completion certificate. Information/registration: Carolyn Sanders, RN (209) 461-3136 or www.Dameronhospital.org.

Outpatient Program Aimed at Teens

Two programs: Adolescents face a number of challenging issues while trying to master their developmental milestones. Mental health issues (including depression), substance abuse and family issues can hinder them from mastering the developmental milestones that guide them into adulthood. The Adolescent Intensive Outpatient Program (IOP) offered by St. Joseph’s Behavioral Health Center, 2510 N. California St., Stockton, is designed for those individuals who need comprehensive treatment for their mental, emotional or chemical dependency problems. This program uses Dialectical Behavioral Therapy to present skills for effective living. Patients learn how to identify and change distorted thinking, communicate effectively in relationships and regain control of their lives. The therapists work collaboratively with parents, doctors and schools. They also put together a discharge plan so the patient continues to get the help they need to thrive into adulthood.

  • Psychiatric Adolescent IOP meets Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays from 4 to 7:30 p.m.
  • Chemical Recovery Adolescent IOP meets Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays from 4 to 7 p.m.

For more information about this and other groups, (209) 461-2000 and ask to speak with a behavioral evaluator or visit www.StJosephsCanHelp.org.

Stork Tours in Lodi

Parents-to-be are offered individual tours of the Lodi Memorial Hospital Maternity Department, 975 S. Fairmont Ave., Lodi. Prospective parents may view the labor, delivery and recovery areas of the hospital and ask questions of the nursing staff. Phone (209) 339-7879 to schedule a tour. For more information on other classes offered by Lodi Health, visit www.lodihealth.org.

HOSPITALS and MEDICAL GROUPS

Community Medical Centers

Click here for Community Medical Centers (Channel Medical Clinic, San Joaquin Valley Dental Group, etc.) website.

Dameron Hospital Events

Click here for Dameron Hospital’s Event Calendar.

Doctors Hospital of Manteca Events

Click here for Doctors Hospital of Manteca Events finder.

Hill Physicians

Click here for Hill Physicians website.

Kaiser Permanente Central Valley

Click here for Kaiser Central Valley News and Events

Lodi Memorial Hospital

Click here for Lodi Memorial Hospital.

Mark Twain Medical Center

Click here for Mark Twain Medical Center in San Andreas.

Planned Parenthood Mar Monte

Click here to find a Planned Parenthood Health Center near you.

San Joaquin General Hospital

Click here for San Joaquin General Hospital website.

St. Joseph’s Medical Center Classes and Events

Click here for St. Joseph’s Medical Center’s Classes and Events.

Sutter Gould Medical Foundation

Click here for Sutter Gould news. Click here for Sutter Gould calendar of events.

Sutter Tracy Community Hospital Education and Support

Click here for Sutter Tracy Community Hospital events, classes and support groups.

PUBLIC HEALTH

San Joaquin County Public Health Services General Information

Ongoing resources for vaccinations and clinic information are:

  1. Public Health Services Influenza website, www.sjcphs.org
  2. Recorded message line at (209) 469-8200, extension 2# for English and 3# for Spanish.
  3. For further information, individuals may call the following numbers at Public Health Services:
  • For general vaccine and clinic questions, call (209) 468-3862;
  • For medical questions, call (209) 468-3822.

Health officials continue to recommend these precautionary measures to help protect against acquiring influenza viruses:

  1. Wash your hands often with soap and water or use alcohol based sanitizers.
  2. Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue or your sleeve, when you cough or sneeze.
  3. Stay home if you are sick until you are free of a fever for 24 hours.
  4. Get vaccinated.

Public Health Services Clinic Schedules (Adults and Children)

Immunization clinic hours are subject to change depending on volume of patients or staffing. Check the Public Health Services website for additional evening clinics or special clinics at www.sjcphs.org. Clinics with an asterisk (*) require patients to call for an appointment.

Stockton Health Center: 1601 E. Hazelton Ave.; (209) 468-3830.

  • Immunizations: Monday 1-4 p.m.; Tuesday 1-4 p.m.; Wednesday 10 a.m.-1 p.m.; Thursday 8-11 a.m. and 1-4 p.m.; Friday 8-11 a.m.
  • Travel clinic*: Thursday 8-11 a.m. and 1 to 4 p.m.
  • Health exams*: Tuesday 1-4 p.m.; Wednesday 10 a.m.-1 p.m.; Friday 8-11 a.m.
  • Sexually transmitted disease clinic: Wednesday 3-6 p.m. and Friday 1-4 p.m., walk-in and by appointment.
  • Tuberculosis clinic*: Tuesday; second and fourth Wednesday of the month.
  • HIV testing: Tuesday 1-4 p.m.; Thursday 1-4 p.m.

Manteca Health Center: 124 Sycamore Ave.; (209) 823-7104 or (800) 839-4949.

  • Immunizations: Wednesday 10 a.m.-1 p.m. and 3-6 p.m.
  • Tuberculosis clinic*: first and third Wednesday 3-6 p.m.
  • HIV testing: first Wednesday 1:30-4 p.m.

Lodi Health Center: 300 W. Oak St.; (209) 331-7303 or (800) 839-4949.

  • Immunizations: Friday 8-11 a.m. and 1-4 p.m.
  • Tuberculosis clinic*: Friday 8-11 a.m. and 1-4 p.m.
  • HIV testing: second and fourth Friday 1:30-4 p.m.

WIC (Women, Infants & Children) Program

Does your food budget need a boost? The WIC Program can help you stretch your food dollars. This special supplemental food program for women, infants and children serves low-income women who are currently pregnant or have recently delivered, breastfeeding moms, infants, and children up to age 5. Eligible applicants receive monthly checks to use at any authorized grocery store for wholesome foods such as fruits and vegetables, milk and cheese, whole-grain breads and cereals, and more. WIC shows you how to feed your family to make them healthier and brings moms and babies closer together by helping with breastfeeding. WIC offers referrals to low-cost or free health care and other community services depending on your needs. WIC services may be obtained at a variety of locations throughout San Joaquin County:

Stockton (209) 468-3280

  • Public Health Services WIC Main Office, 1145 N. Hunter St.: Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Wednesday 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.; open two Saturdays a month.
  • Family Health Center, 1414 N. California St.: Wednesday 8 a.m. to noon, 1 to 5 p.m.
  • CUFF (Coalition United for Families), 2044 Fair St.: Thursday 8 a.m. to noon, 1 to 5 p.m.
  • Taylor Family Center, 1101 Lever Blvd.: Wednesday 8 a.m. to noon, 1 to 4 p.m.
  • Transcultural Clinic, 4422 N. Pershing Ave. Suite D-5: Tuesday 8 a.m. to noon, 1 to 5 p.m.

Manteca  (209) 823-7104

  • Public Health Services, 124 Sycamore Lane: Tuesday, Thursday, Friday 8 a.m. to noon, 1 to 5 p.m.

Tracy (209) 831-5930

  • Public Health Services, 205 W. Ninth St.: Monday, Wednesday 8 a.m. to noon, 1 to 5 p.m.

Flu Shots in Calaveras County

Fall brings cooler temperatures and the start of the flu season. Getting flu vaccine early offers greater protection throughout flu season. The Calaveras County Public Health Department recommends everyone 6 months of age and older get flu vaccine every year. Flu season can start as early as October and continue through March. “Seasonal flu can be serious,” said Dr. Dean Kelaita, Calaveras County health officer. “Every year people die from the flu.” Some children, youth and adults are at risk of serious illness and possibly death if they are not protected from the flu. They need to get flu vaccine now.

  • Adults 50 years of age and over.
  • Pregnant women.
  • Children and youth 5-18 years on long-term aspirin therapy.
  • Everyone with chronic health conditions (including diabetes, kidney, heart or lung disease).

If you care for an infant less than 6 months or people with chronic health conditions, you can help protect them by getting your flu vaccine. Even if you had a flu vaccination last year, you need another one this year to be protected and to protect others who are at risk. The Public Health Department will offer five community flu clinics:

  • Every Monday (3 to 5:30 p.m.) and Thursday (8 a.m. to noon): Calaveras County Public Health, 700 Mountain Ranch Road, Suite C2, San Andreas. The monthly Valley Springs Immunization Clinic (third Tuesday, 3 to 5:30 pm) will also offer flu vaccine during flu season.

The flu vaccine is $16.  Medicare Part B is accepted.  No one will be denied service due to inability to pay. For more information about the vaccine or the clinics, contact the Public Health Department at (209) 754-6460 or visit the Public Health website at www.calaveraspublichealth.com.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

What You Need to Know About Joe’s Health Calendar

Have a health-oriented event the public in San Joaquin County should know about? Let me know at jgoldeen@recordnet.com and I’ll get it into my Health Calendar. I’m not interested in promoting commercial enterprises here, but I am interested in helping out nonprofit and/or community groups, hospitals, clinics, physicians and other health-care providers. Look for five categories: Community Events, News, Ongoing, Hospitals & Medical Groups, and Public Health. TO THE PUBLIC: I won’t list an item here from a source that I don’t know or trust. So I believe you can count on what you read here. If there is a problem, please don’t hesitate to let me know at (209) 546-8278 or jgoldeen@recordnet.com. Thanks, Joe

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Joe’s Health Calendar June 30

COMMUNITY EVENTS

Celebrate – Eat Smart in North Stockton

June 30 (today) 12:30 to 1:30 p.m.: San Joaquin County Public Health Services is offering free nutrition classes at Diamond Cove II, 5506 Tam O’Shanter Drive, Stockton. Each week a different topic will be covered, but participants can join at any time and no registration is required. Classes are open to the public and will include free healthy tools and food tastings. You will learn to: prepare new healthy recipes; make your food dollars count; understand food labels; eat more fruits and vegetables; build strong bones; and increase physical activity. Free cookbooks and take-home items. Information: (209) 468-3821. Funded by USDA SNAP-Ed, an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Build Strong Bones in Manteca

June 30 (today) 4 to 5 p.m.: San Joaquin County Public Health Services is offering free nutrition classes at Manteca Public Library, 320 W. Center St., Manteca. Each week a different topic will be covered, but participants can join at any time and no registration is required. Classes are open to the public and will include free healthy tools and food tastings. You will learn to: prepare new healthy recipes; make your food dollars count; understand food labels; eat more fruits and vegetables; build strong bones; and increase physical activity. Free cookbooks and take-home items. Information: (209) 468-3821. Funded by USDA SNAP-Ed, an equal opportunity provider and employer.

VA Palo Alto Hosts Open House for Vets, Community

June 30 (today) 5 to 6:30 p.m.: VA Palo Alto Health Care System (VAPAHCS) will be holding an Open House at its Palo Alto Division, 3801 Miranda Ave., Palo Alto. This will be a special event as Department of Veterans Affairs begins its Summer of Service campaign around the nation. The focus of the event will be leveraging community partnerships to achieve VA and VAPAHCS’ goals. This summer, VA is renewing its commitment to America’s veterans, and asking for community partners to help in honoring that commitment.  VAPAHCS will be inviting not only veterans but also community partners and stakeholders to visit its Palo Alto campus for an open house with representation from the health care system, Veteran Benefits Administration and National Cemetery Administration.  VA’s partners can also help by getting the word out this summer that VA is a great place to work, with one of the best missions, serving the best clients – veterans. For more information, those interested can visit http://mycareeratva.va.gov/  or http://www.usajobs.gov. Those who cannot attend are encouraged to visit www.paloalto.va.gov,www.facebook.com/vapahcs,  or www.twitter.com/vapaloaltoto follow events and to learn more about how they can support veterans.

Go Lean With Protein in Manteca

July 7 (Tuesday) 4 to 5 p.m.: San Joaquin County Public Health Services is offering free nutrition classes at Manteca Public Library, 320 W. Center St., Manteca. Each week a different topic will be covered, but participants can join at any time and no registration is required. Classes are open to the public and will include free healthy tools and food tastings. You will learn to: prepare new healthy recipes; make your food dollars count; understand food labels; eat more fruits and vegetables; build strong bones; and increase physical activity. Free cookbooks and take-home items. Information: (209) 468-3821. Funded by USDA SNAP-Ed, an equal opportunity provider and employer

Build Strong Bones in East Stockton

July 10 (Friday) noon to 1 p.m.: San Joaquin County Public Health Services is offering free nutrition classes at Health Net Community Center, 678 N. Wilson Way, Suite 16 (Eastland Plaza), Stockton. Each week a different topic will be covered, but participants can join at any time and no registration is required. Classes are open to the public and will include free healthy tools and food tastings. You will learn to: prepare new healthy recipes; make your food dollars count; understand food labels; eat more fruits and vegetables; build strong bones; and increase physical activity. Free cookbooks and take-home items. Information: (209) 468-3821. Funded by USDA SNAP-Ed, an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Make a Change in Manteca

July 14 (Tuesday) 4 to 5 p.m.: San Joaquin County Public Health Services is offering free nutrition classes at Manteca Public Library, 320 W. Center St., Manteca. Each week a different topic will be covered, but participants can join at any time and no registration is required. Classes are open to the public and will include free healthy tools and food tastings. You will learn to: prepare new healthy recipes; make your food dollars count; understand food labels; eat more fruits and vegetables; build strong bones; and increase physical activity. Free cookbooks and take-home items. Information: (209) 468-3821. Funded by USDA SNAP-Ed, an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Go Lean With Protein in East Stockton

July 17 (Friday) noon to 1 p.m.: San Joaquin County Public Health Services is offering free nutrition classes at Health Net Community Center, 678 N. Wilson Way, Suite 16 (Eastland Plaza), Stockton. Each week a different topic will be covered, but participants can join at any time and no registration is required. Classes are open to the public and will include free healthy tools and food tastings. You will learn to: prepare new healthy recipes; make your food dollars count; understand food labels; eat more fruits and vegetables; build strong bones; and increase physical activity. Free cookbooks and take-home items. Information: (209) 468-3821. Funded by USDA SNAP-Ed, an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Healthy Eating Active Living Quarterly Meeting

July 21 (Tuesday) 9 a.m. to noon: This quarter’s meeting at South Sacramento Christian Center, 7710 Stockton Blvd., Sacramento, will explore the Smarter Lunchrooms Movement and the EatFresh.org Resource. Please join us as we share best practices, exchange information and explore mutual interventions and cooperative efforts to provide nutrition and obesity prevention services. Participation is open to anyone interested in working collaboratively to improve the health of communities within the Delta and Gold Country Region of California. Registration is encouraged. CLICK HERE, For more information, please contact Lara Falkenstein.

Celebrate – Eat Smart in Manteca

July 21 (Tuesday) 4 to 5 p.m.: San Joaquin County Public Health Services is offering free nutrition classes at Manteca Public Library, 320 W. Center St., Manteca. Each week a different topic will be covered, but participants can join at any time and no registration is required. Classes are open to the public and will include free healthy tools and food tastings. You will learn to: prepare new healthy recipes; make your food dollars count; understand food labels; eat more fruits and vegetables; build strong bones; and increase physical activity. Free cookbooks and take-home items. Information: (209) 468-3821. Funded by USDA SNAP-Ed, an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Make a Change in East Stockton

July 24 (Friday) noon to 1 p.m.: San Joaquin County Public Health Services is offering free nutrition classes at Health Net Community Center, 678 N. Wilson Way, Suite 16 (Eastland Plaza), Stockton. Each week a different topic will be covered, but participants can join at any time and no registration is required. Classes are open to the public and will include free healthy tools and food tastings. You will learn to: prepare new healthy recipes; make your food dollars count; understand food labels; eat more fruits and vegetables; build strong bones; and increase physical activity. Free cookbooks and take-home items. Information: (209) 468-3821. Funded by USDA SNAP-Ed, an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Celebrate – Eat Smart in East Stockton

July 31 (Friday) noon to 1 p.m.: San Joaquin County Public Health Services is offering free nutrition classes at Health Net Community Center, 678 N. Wilson Way, Suite 16 (Eastland Plaza), Stockton. Each week a different topic will be covered, but participants can join at any time and no registration is required. Classes are open to the public and will include free healthy tools and food tastings. You will learn to: prepare new healthy recipes; make your food dollars count; understand food labels; eat more fruits and vegetables; build strong bones; and increase physical activity. Free cookbooks and take-home items. Information: (209) 468-3821. Funded by USDA SNAP-Ed, an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Free Health & Vision Fair in Stockton

Sept. 18 (Friday) 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.: The eighth annual Health & Vision Fair sponsored by the Community Center for the Blind, 130 W. Flora St., Stockton, will offer free vision screenings, hearing evaluations, blood pressure checks, goodies and giveaways. Bring your family. Many of Stockton’s resources and agencies will be represented. The Lions’ Eye Mobile will be on site. Information: (209) 466-3836.

Celebration on Central (Lodi) for Bi-National Health Week

Sept. 27 (Sunday) 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.: Up to 60 agencies will be providing information, free health screenings, arts and crafts activities, face painting, amusing clowns, free food, live entertainment, raffle prizes and agencies interacting with children and families at the Celebration on Central at Joe Serna Jr. Charter School, 29 S. Central Ave., Lodi.

Free Multicultural Health and Community Fair in Stockton

Oct. 10 (Saturday) 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.: West Lane Oaks Family Resource Center, part of the Community Partnership for Families of San Joaquin County, is planning its eighth Annual Multicultural Health and Community Fair at the Normandy Village Shopping Center, northeast corner of Hammer and West lanes, Stockton, in the parking lot adjacent to Carl’s Jr. We hope that you can join us this year and help to make our event a success. The goal of the Multicultural Health and Community Fair is to educate the community on where and how to find resources and programs through the various agencies in attendance and to celebrate our cultural diversity. Over 50 agencies participated at last year’s event. These agencies, such as social service agencies, health providers and financial planning, provided free services and assisted families with their various needs. We also provided activities for children. Over 600 families attended our event last year, and this year we hope to attract more than 1,000 families. Information: (209) 644-8619.

Celebrate Care Givers With an Inner Safari

Nov. 14 (Saturday) 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.: Healings in Motion presents its annual day to honor and recognize care givers: An Inner Safari – A Joyful Day to Relax, Retool and Renew. Event will be held at Robert Cabral Agricultural Center, 2101 E. Earhart Drive, Stockton. Information and registration: Click here.

CareVan Offers Free Mobile Health Clinic

St. Joseph’s Medical Center CareVan offers a free health clinic for low-income and no-insurance individuals or families, 16 years old and older. Mobile health care services will be available to handle most minor urgent health care needs such as mild burns, bumps, abrasions, sprains, sinus and urinary tract infections, cold and flu. No narcotics prescriptions will be available. Information: (209) 461-3471 or www.StJosephsCares.org/CarevanClinic schedule is subject to change without notice. Walk-In appointments are available.

  • Tuesdays 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.: Dollar General, 310 W. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., Stockton.
  • Wednesdays & Thursdays 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.: For those 16 and older only; San Joaquin County Fairgrounds, 1658 S. Airport Way, Stockton.

ER Wait Watcher: Which ER Will See You the Fastest?

Heading to the emergency room? ProPublica provides a great tool to help. You may wait a while before a doctor or other treating professional sees you — and the hospital nearest to you might not be the one that sees you the fastest. Click here to look up average ER wait times, as reported by hospitals to the federal government, as well as the time it takes to get there in current traffic, as reported by Google.

Farmers Markets In San Joaquin County

San Joaquin County Public Health Services Network for a Healthy California program has developed a list of San Joaquin County Farmers Markets as part of its goal to increase fruit and vegetable consumption. Click here for the latest list of farmers markets around San Joaquin County, including times and locations.

NEWS

Need Help in San Joaquin County? Call 2-1-1

Have no money for food? Just lost your job? Sick and need a health clinic? Depressed? How do I file taxes? Call 2-1-1 for help. Click here for the flier.

AMA Strengthens Youth Policy on E-Cigarettes

With the growing popularity of electronic cigarettes among the nation’s youth, the American Medical Association (AMA) adopted new policy to further strengthen its support of regulatory oversight of electronic cigarettes. The policy calls for the passage of laws and regulations that would: set the minimum legal purchase age for electronic cigarettes and their liquid nicotine refills at 21 years old; require liquid nicotine to be packaged in child-resistant containers; and urge strict enforcement of laws prohibiting the sale of tobacco products to minors. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s 2014 National Youth Tobacco Survey, e-cigarette use among middle and high school students tripled from 2013 to 2014. The survey data showed e-cigarette use among high school students increased from 4.5 percent in 2013 to 13.4 percent in 2014 – an increase from approximately 660,000 to 2 million students. Among middle school students, the data indicated that e-cigarette use more than tripled from 1.1 percent in 2013 to 3.9 percent in 2014 – an increase from approximately 120,000 to 450,000 students. “The AMA continues to advocate for more stringent policies to protect our country’s youth from the dangers of tobacco use and improve public health. The AMA’s newest policy expands on the AMA’s longtime efforts to help keep all tobacco products, including electronic cigarettes, out of the hands of young people, by urging laws to deter the sale of electronic cigarettes to anyone under the age of 21,” AMA President Dr. Robert Wah said. “We also urge the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to act now to implement its proposed rule to effectively regulate electronic cigarettes.” The new policy extends existing AMA policy adopted in 2013 and 2014 calling for all electronic cigarettes to be subject to the same regulations and oversight that the FDA applies to tobacco and nicotine products, seeking tighter marketing restrictions on manufacturers, and prohibiting claims that electronic cigarettes are effective tobacco cessation tools. “Improving the health of the nation is AMA’s top priority and we will continue to advocate for policies that help reduce the burden of preventable diseases like cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes, both of which can be linked to smoking,” Wah said.

Valley Children’s, Stanford Partner on Pediatric Programs

Valley Children’s Healthcare of Madera and Stanford University School of Medicine will partner to create a graduate medical education program based at Valley Children’s Hospital. “Valley Children’s is taking the lead in training the next generation of pediatricians and pediatric surgical and medical specialists,” said Dr. David Christensen, Valley Children’s chief medical officer. “With Stanford as our academic partner, we’ll prepare doctors to continue providing the highest quality medical care for children.” The “Valley Children’s Pediatric Residency Program, Affiliated with Stanford University School of Medicine” will allow Valley Children’s residents to have rotations and learning opportunities at the Palo Alto campus and for Stanford’s residents to learn here. The fellowship program at Valley Children’s will be the first of its kind in the Valley. It will train doctors to become pediatric subspecialists, building on the highest quality of exceptional care in service lines like pediatric surgery, gastroenterology and emergency medicine. “We are excited about the opportunity to partner with Valley Children’s in the creation of a new, pediatric-focused teaching program in Central California and for our current residents and fellows to rotate at Valley Children’s,” said Dr. Lloyd Minor, dean of the Stanford University School of Medicine. “Valley Children’s is one of the largest children’s hospitals in California and has the state’s busiest emergency department for patients younger than 21 years of age. By spending time there, our residents will have the opportunity to see a wide variety of complex and critically ill patients in a short period of time.” A unique aspect of the Pediatric Residency and Fellowship programs will be Valley Children’s partnership with hospitals and medical groups throughout the area. Valley Children’s residents and fellows will have the opportunity for rotations at partner locations – including Kaiser Permanente and Saint Agnes Medical Center in Fresno and Dignity Health – and local pediatricians’ offices. “These relationships are key to the success of our program,” said Valley Children’s President and CEO Todd Suntrapak. “One of our goals is to attract pediatricians and subspecialists to our area and keep them here. That means more Valley families will have access to the care they need, right where they live. One of the best ways we can do this is by exposing our residents and fellows to the diverse practice opportunities that exist in the Central Valley. We are grateful that so many groups are committed to helping Valley Children’s train the next generation of pediatricians and pediatric specialists.” Leading the new program is Valley Children’s Chief of Pediatrics Dr. Jolie Limon. Limon joined Valley Children’s as a pediatric hospitalist in 2000. She has won numerous teaching awards during her tenure and her areas of expertise include resident leadership and interprofessional education. “This is an exciting time,” Limon said. “I look forward to building a program that not only trains exceptional pediatricians but also creates future leaders in pediatric care for the Valley. Valley Children’s Hospital has a wealth of wonderful clinicians, educators and patients by which to sustain an amazing training program.” Valley Children’s Hospital will continue to serve as a teaching site for more than 190 residents and medical students in a dozen other programs, including those based at Kaweah Delta Health Care District in Visalia, Mercy Medical Center in Merced and Clinica Sierra Vista in Fresno.

California Endowment Unveils New Website

The California Endowment, the state’s largest health foundation, today unveiled its new website – designed to bring more tools and features to its users, and allowing The Endowment to better connect with its many partner organizations, as well as thought leaders and the people of California. “Our new site is an important engine to support The Endowment’s work to transform communities across California, and improve the fundamental health status of all Californians,” said Dr. Robert Ross, M.D., chief executive officer. “The site’s new features allow us to reach more people and ultimately help realize more change throughout California.” The website offers a fresh design and fully integrates with today’s digital environment. It’s mobile friendly and easily accessible with new tools, interactive graphics, timely information and links to The Endowment’s social media platforms. Please visit the site at www.calendow.org.

Top Chronic Conditions: 11 Million and Counting

 SEE THE REPORT

GET THE CHARTS

Chronic conditions are the leading cause of death and disability in the United States, and the biggest contributor to health care costs. But there is wide variation in their incidence, with major differences depending on age, income, race and ethnicity, and insurance status. In addition, many Californians with chronic conditions are delaying needed care because of cost. Californians with the Top Chronic Conditions: 11 Million and Counting looks at five major chronic conditions — asthma, diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure, and serious psychological distress — and how each of these affects Californians. Among the key findings:

  • About 40% of adults reported having at least one of the five chronic conditions studied.
  • High blood pressure is the most common chronic condition, affecting about one in four, or 7.6 million, adults in California.
  • As income rises, the prevalence of chronic conditions falls. Adults living under 138% of the federal poverty level were more likely to have two or more chronic conditions (14%) than those in the highest income group, 400%+ of the federal poverty level (8%).
  • Of Californians with psychological distress, 34% delayed needed medical care, and 27% delayed filling prescriptions. Cost or lack of insurance was frequently cited as the reason for these delays.
  • Of Californians age 65 or older, 70% have at least one chronic condition, compared to 26% of those age 18 to 39.

See the complete report and charts now.

This report is published as part of the CHCF California Health Care Almanac, an online clearinghouse for key data and analysis examining California’s health care marketplace. Find all Almanac reports at www.chcf.org/almanac.

Resources to Help You Better Understand Stem Cell Science

The International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) has launched an expanded “Closer Look at Stem Cells” website www.closerlookatstemcells.org , an online resource to help patients and their families make informed decisions about stem cell treatments, clinics and their health. The ISSCR, a global membership-based organization comprised of approximately 4,000 stem cell researchers, clinicians and ethicists, is concerned that stem cell treatments are being marketed by clinics around the world without appropriate oversight and patient protections in place to ensure safety and likely benefit. New resources on the website emphasize key scientific principles and practices that will help the public to better evaluate treatment claims. “The ‘Closer Look at Stem Cells’ website is a direct channel from researchers to the public,” said Megan Munsie, a scientist with Stem Cells Australia and chairperson of the ISSCR task force responsible for the website expansion. “Promising clinical trials are under way for many diseases and conditions, but most stem cell-based treatments are still in the future. We hope that the website will foster interest and excitement in the science, but also an understanding of the current limitations of stem cells as medicine and a healthy skepticism of clinics selling treatments.” The website, once patient focused, is now a comprehensive destination for those interested in stem cell science and research being conducted across the globe. It includes informational pages on basic stem cell biology, the process by which science becomes medicine, clinical trials and the use of stem cells in understanding specific health conditions – macular degeneration, multiple sclerosis, heart disease and diabetes. Pages on other conditions will be added in the coming months. It is also home to the “Stem Cells in Focus” blog, which seeks to make cutting-edge research from the stem cell field accessible to non-scientists. “I am often contacted by patients struggling with very difficult decisions about their health, and who want to know more about the potential of stem cells,” said Larry Goldstein, a stem cell scientist at the University of California, San Diego and a member of the ISSCR task force responsible for the website expansion. “My experience is that understanding the current state of stem cell science and medicine is key to making informed decisions about stem cell treatments, and so I encourage patients to start their journey on the ‘Closer Look at Stem Cells’ website.”

California Debuts Ads to Counter E-Cigarettes

Twenty-five years after launching the first anti-smoking advertisements in the state, the California Department of Public Health on March 23 premiered a series of television, digital, and outdoor ads in a new campaign called “Wake Up,” as part of its educational effort to inform the public about the dangers of e-cigarettes. “California has been a world leader in tobacco use prevention and cessation since 1990, with one of the lowest youth and adult smoking rates in the nation. The aggressive marketing and escalating use of e-cigarettes threatens to erode that progress,” said Dr. Karen Smith, newly appointed CDPH director and state health officer. CDPH recently released a report and health advisory highlighting areas of concern regarding e-cigarettes, including the sharp rise in e-cigarette use among California teens and young adults, the highly addictive nature of nicotine in e-cigarettes, the surge in accidental nicotine poisonings occurring in young children, and that secondhand e-cigarette emissions contain several toxic chemicals. Research shows that youth and young adults who use e-cigarettes are far more likely to also use traditional cigarettes and other tobacco products. “Our advertising campaign is telling the public to ‘wake up’ to the fact that these are highly addictive products being mass marketed,” said Dr. Smith. The advertising campaign includes two television ads that feature songs from the 1950s and ‘60s and images portraying the health risks of e-cigarettes. One TV ad underscores the e-cigarette industry’s use of candy flavored ‘e-juice’ and products that entice the next generation to become addicted to nicotine. The second TV spot emphasizes the dangers and addictiveness of e-cigarettes, while exposing the fact that big tobacco companies are in the e-cigarette business. E-cigarettes are largely unregulated at the federal level and companies are not required to disclose what is in their products or how they are made. To inform the public about the dangers of e-cigarettes, CDPH launched an educational campaign in late January. The advertising component kicked off on March 23 and runs through June 2015, with TV and digital ads on websites, online radio and social media throughout the state. Outdoor ads, including billboards, at gas stations and in malls, and ads in movie theaters will be phased in throughout the campaign. This counter e-cigarette advertising campaign is part of CDPH’s ongoing anti- tobacco media efforts. In addition to the advertising, the CDPH educational campaign will include:

  • Partnering with the local public health, medical, and child care organizations to increase awareness about the known toxicity of e-cigarettes and the high risk of poisonings, especially to children, while continuing to promote and support the use of proven effective cessation therapies.
  • Joining with the California Department of Education and school officials to assist in providing accurate information to parents, students, teachers, and school administrators on the dangers of e-cigarettes.

The California Tobacco Control Program was established by the Tobacco Tax and Health Protection Act of 1988. The act, approved by California voters, instituted a 25-cent tax on each pack of cigarettes and earmarked 5 cents of that tax to fund California’s tobacco control efforts. These efforts include supporting local health departments and community organizations, a media campaign, and evaluation and surveillance. California’s comprehensive approach has changed social norms around tobacco use and secondhand smoke. California’s tobacco control efforts have reduced both adult and youth smoking rates by 50 percent, saved more than 1 million lives and have resulted in $134 billion worth of savings in health care costs. Learn more at TobaccoFreeCA.com.

Manteca Unified Students Learn Hands-Only CPR

Knowing the importance of quick action upon a person experiencing sudden cardiac arrest, the hands-only CPR push was created by Manteca Unified School District Health Services’ Caroline Thibodeau and Secondary Education’s Tevani Liotard along with Manteca District Ambulance Service’s Jonathan Mendoza. Other agencies who take part are Manteca Fire Department, Lathrop-Manteca Fire Department and Stockton Fire Department. The group has presented a hands-Only CPR lecture and hands-on demonstration to all MUSD ninth-grade students. The lecture and presentation has been used throughout the MUSD high schools over the past 16 months. A total of 2,794 students and 73 adults have been taught the hands-only CPR to date. By the end of the school year, the number will increase to more than 3,500 students. All students get to experience hands-on by doing chest compression on a mannequin plus hearing and seeing the importance of quickly starting hands- only CPR quickly till help arrives. Paramedics, firefighters and teachers assist the students during the mannequin chest compression portion.  a majority of the students say, “Doing chest compressions is harder than I thought, but, I now feel I can do it or tell someone how to do it.” In December, a student at Manteca High School collapsed in the middle of class experiencing a sudden cardiac arrest.  Due to the quick action of the vice principal, Manteca Police Department resource officer, Manteca District Ambulance EMTs and paramedics, Manteca firefighters and continuous care at St. Joseph’s Medical Center and Stanford Hospital, this student is alive and has fully recovered.

Comprehensive Website Aims to Reduce Health Disparities

Welltopia, a new website launched by the California Department of Health Care Services and the UC Davis Institute for Population Health Improvement, offers a wide range of essential resources to help Californians, especially those on limited incomes, build healthier lives and communities. Designed to complement the popularWelltopia by DHCS Facebook page, the new website at MyWelltopia.com serves as a comprehensive resource connecting individuals, families and communities to credible information that addresses the social determinants of health and other leading causes of preventable death. Many studies have shown that access to health care, education, employment, housing, nutritious foods and physical activity are among the fundamental drivers of health for individuals and their communities. Making reliable information and resources available for people of all ages is key to creating healthy environments. “We developed Welltopia to be a convenient and trusted source of information covering all three aspects of health — physical, mental and well-being,” said Neal Kohatsu, DHCS medical director. “We’ve made every effort to ensure that the resources are both accurate and accessible to consumers.” The Welltopia site organizes information into five categories — Well Body, Well Mind, Jobs & Training, Health Insurance, and Basic Needs. It includes information on nutrition, physical activity, smoking cessation, alcohol- and drug-abuse prevention, stress management, health insurance, residency and social services, among others. The site also contains videos, photos and graphics with information about health-related programs. There are free applications, such as fitness trackers, women’s health information, recipes and food journals to track daily calorie intake, and links to CalFresh, education, job placement resources and other social services. “Welltopia should be the first stop for persons seeking reliable information about the many determinants of health,” said Kenneth Kizer, IPHI director. “Its friendly format quickly guides users to practical and trustworthy sources.” The Department of Health Care Services manages California’s form of Medicaid, known as Medi-Cal, which helps millions of low-income Californians obtain access to affordable, high-quality health care, including medical, dental, mental health, substance use disorder services, and long-term services and supports. DHCS aims to preserve and improve the health of all Californians. The UC Davis Institute for Population Health Improvement fosters population health within the UC Davis Health System and communities throughout the state. IPHI’s mission is to create, apply and disseminate knowledge about the many determinants of health to improve health and health security, and to support activities that improve health equity and eliminate health disparities.

Protect Your Family From E-Cigarettes

Read some facts from the California Department of Public Health. To learn more, click here.

HICAP Seeking Volunteers to Counsel Seniors on Medicare

HICAP – the Health Insurance Counseling and Advocacy Program – is a nonprofit organization dedicated to helping Medicare beneficiaries navigate the Medicare maze.  We do this in one-on-one counseling sessions, with registered HICAP volunteer counselors. HICAP counselors help Medicare beneficiaries: understand Medicare; compare supplemental policies; review HMO and PPO benefits; learn about government assistance programs; prepare appeals and challenge denials, and clarify rights as a health care consumer.  Our services are always free and always unbiased.  We neither sell nor recommend specific insurance companies.  Rather, we educate beneficiaries to make the choice best for their needs. We are looking for energetic seniors who are computer-savvy, interested in learning, and good communicators.  We will conduct training in San Joaquin County soon.  If you are interested in learning more about HICAP volunteering, contact HICAP at (209) 470-7812.

Breastfeeding and Working

The Breastfeeding Coalition of San Joaquin County offers its “Working & Breastfeeding” Toolkit at BreastfeedSJC.org. This toolkit contains tips, answers to frequently asked questions and links to online resources for families and employers. Jump on over to BreastfeedSJC.org/Working-and-Breastfeeding to check it out.

Diabetes Resources in San Joaquin County

Diabetes is a costly disease, both in terms of people’s health and well-being, and in terms of dollars spent on treatment, medications and lost days at work and school. San Joaquin County annually accounts for among the worst death rates from diabetes among all 58 California counties. In an attempt to make its estimated 60,000 residents with diabetes aware of the many local resources available to help them deal with the disease, a dozen billboards in English and Spanish have been posted around the county directing readers to the UniteForDiabetesSJC.org website. At that website is information on numerous free classes and programs that provide education and training on preventing diabetes, managing the disease, controlling its side effects, and links to more resources, including special events and finding a physician. For questions on how to navigate the website or find a class, residents may call Vanessa Armendariz, community project manager at the San Joaquin Medical Society, at(209) 952-5299. The billboards came about through the efforts of the Diabetes Work Group, a subcommittee of San Joaquin County Public Health’s Obesity and Chronic Disease Prevention Task Force. Funding was provided through a grant from Kaiser Permanente Community Benefit Programs Division-Central Valley Area.

Senior Gateway Website: Don’t Be a Victim

California Insurance Commissioner Dave Jones has unveiled a new consumer protection tool for California seniors, who have traditionally been prime targets for con artists. The California Department of Insurance (CDI) is hosting a new Web site www.seniors.ca.gov to educate seniors and their advocates and provide helpful information about how to avoid becoming victims of personal or financial abuse. The Web site, called Senior Gateway, is important because seniors, including older veterans, are disproportionately at risk of being preyed upon financially and subjected to neglect and abuse. The Senior Gateway is sponsored by the Elder Financial Abuse Interagency Roundtable (E-FAIR), convened by CDI and includes representatives from many California agencies who share a common purpose of safeguarding the welfare of California’s seniors. “The goal of this collaborative effort is to assemble, in one convenient location, valuable information not only for seniors, but their families and caregivers. This site will help California seniors find resources and solve problems, and will enable participating agencies to better serve this important segment of our population,” Jones said. The site offers seniors valuable tips and resources in the following areas, and more:

  • Avoiding and reporting abuse and neglect by in-home caregivers or in facilities; learn about different types of abuse and the warning signs.
  • Preventing and reporting financial fraud, abuse and scams targeting seniors.
  • Understanding health care, insurance, Medicare and long-term care; know what long-term care includes.
  • Locating services and programs available to assist older adults.
  • Knowing your rights before buying insurance; what seniors need to know about annuities.
  • Investing wisely and understanding the ins and outs of reverse mortgages.

$5,000 Grants Help Pay for Children’s Medical Expenses

UnitedHealthcare Children’s Foundation (UHCCF) is seeking grant applications from families in need of financial assistance to help pay for their child’s health care treatments, services or equipment not covered, or not fully covered, by their commercial health insurance plan. Qualifying families can receive up to $5,000 to help pay for medical services and equipment such as physical, occupational and speech therapy, counseling services, surgeries, prescriptions, wheelchairs, orthotics, eyeglasses and hearing aids. To be eligible for a grant, children must be 16 years of age or younger. Families must meet economic guidelines, reside in the United States and have a commercial health insurance plan. Grants are available for medical expenses families have incurred 60 days prior to the date of application as well as for ongoing and future medical needs. Parents or legal guardians may apply for grants at www.uhccf.org, and there is no application deadline. Organizations or private donors can make tax-deductible donations to the foundation at this website. In 2011, UHCCF awarded more than 1,200 grants to families across the United States for treatments associated with medical conditions such as cancer, spina bifida, muscular dystrophy, diabetes, hearing loss, autism, cystic fibrosis, Down syndrome, ADHD and cerebral palsy.

Facts About Fruits and Vegetables

Click here for lots of great information about fruits and vegetables.

ONGOING

Cambodian and Hmong Language Diabetes Classes

The Cambodian and Hmong communities of Stockton are invited to attend free diabetes classes presented in the Khmer and Hmong languages. Call Jou Moua at (209) 298-2374 or (209) 461-3224 to find a class.

Fit Families for Life

Fit Families for Life is a weekly class for parents offered by HealthNet and held at Fathers and Families of San Joaquin, 338 E. Market St., Stockton. All parents are welcome and there is no cost to attend. Participants will learn about nutrition, cooking and exercise. Information and registration: Renee Garcia at (209) 941-0701.

Journey to Control Diabetes Education Program

Mondays 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.: Dameron Hospital offers a free diabetes education program, with classes held in the Dameron Hospital Annex, 445 W. Acacia St., Stockton. Preregistration is required. Contact Carolyn Sanders, RN, at c.sanders@dameronhospital.org(209) 461-3136 or (209) 461-7597.

Al-Anon Freedom to Change Support Group

Mondays and Thursdays 7 to 8:30 p.m.: Lodi Health offers Al-Anon Freedom to Change meetings for family and friends of problem drinkers. The group helps people to know what to do when someone close to them drinks too much. Meetings are offered several times each month at Lodi Memorial Hospital, 975 S. Fairmont Ave., Lodi. Information: www.lodihealth.org.

Man-to-Man Prostate Cancer Support Group

First Monday of Month 7 to 9 p.m.: Dameron Hospital, 525 W. Acacia St., Stockton, holds a support group for men diagnosed with prostate cancer and their families and caregivers. The meetings are facilitated by trained volunteers who are prostate cancer survivors. Information: Ernest Pontiflet at (209) 952-9092.

Crystal Meth Anonymous Recovery Group

Mondays 6:30 p.m.: 825 Central Ave., Lodi. Information: (209) 430-9780 or (209) 368-0756.

Yoga for People Dealing with Cancer

Mondays 5:30 to 7 p.m.: This free weekly Yoga & Breathing class for cancer patients will help individuals sleep better and reduce pain. This class is led by yoga instructor Chinu Mehdi in Classrooms 1 and 2, St. Joseph’s Medical Center, 1800 N. California St., Stockton. Information: (209) 467-6550 orSJCancerInfo@dignityhealth.org.

Respiratory Support Group for Better Breathing

First Tuesday of month 10 to 11 a.m.: Lodi Health’s Respiratory Therapy Department and the American Lung Association of California Valley Lode offer a free “Better Breathers’” respiratory-support group for people and their family members with breathing problems including asthma, bronchitis and emphysema. Participants will learn how to cope with chronic lung disease, understand lungs and how they work and use medications and oxygen properly. The group meets at Lodi Health West, 800 S. Lower Sacramento Road, Lodi. Pre-registration is recommended by calling (209) 339-7445. For information on other classes available at Lodi Memorial, visit its website at www.lodihealth.org.

The Beat Goes On Cardiac Support Group

First Tuesday of month 11 a.m. to noon: Lodi Health offers a free cardiac support group at Lodi Health West, 800 S. Lower Sacramento Road, Lodi. “The Beat Goes On” cardiac support group is a community-based nonprofit group that offers practical tools for healthy living to heart disease patients, their families and caregivers. Its mission is to provide community awareness that those with heart disease can live well through support meetings and educational forums. Upcoming topics include exercise, stress management and nutrition counseling services. All are welcomed to attend. Information: (209) 339-7664.

Planned Childbirth Services

Tuesdays 6 to 8 p.m.: Dameron Hospital, 525 W. Acacia St., Stockton, hosts a four-class series which answers questions and prepares mom and her partner for labor and birth. Bring two pillows and a comfortable blanket or exercise mat to each class. These classes are requested during expecting mother’s third trimester. Information/registration: Carolyn Sanders, RN (209) 461-3136 or www.Dameronhospital.org.

Lactation Support Group in Lodi

Tuesdays 10 a.m.: Lodi Health offers The Lactation Club, a support group for breastfeeding moms that is held in Classroom A at Lodi Memorial Hospital, 975 S. Fairmont Ave., Lodi. Lactation consultants are readily available to answer questions and help with breastfeeding issues. A scale will also be on hand to weigh babies. Information: (209) 339.7872 or www.lodihealth.org.

Say Yes to Breastfeeding

Tuesdays 6 to 8 p.m.: Dameron Hospital, 525 W. Acacia St., Stockton, offers a class that outlines the information and basic benefits and risk management of breastfeeding. Topics include latching, early skin-to-skin on cue, expressing milk and helpful hints on early infant feeding. In addition, the hospital offers a monthly Mommy and Me-Breastfeeding support group where mothers, babies and hospital clerical staff meet the second Monday of each month. Information/registration: Carolyn Sanders, RN (209) 461-3136 or www.Dameronhospital.org.

Precious Preemies

Second Tuesday of the month, 9:30 to 10:30 a.m.: Precious Preemies: A Discussion Group for Families Raising Premature Infants and Infants with Medical Concerns required registration and is held at Family Resource Network, Sherwood Executive Center, 5250 Claremont Ave., Suite 148, Stockton. Information: www.frcn.org/calendar.asp or (209) 472-3674 or (800) 847-3030.

Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous

Are you having trouble controlling the way you eat? Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous (FA) is a free Twelve Step recovery program for anyone suffering from food obsession, overeating, undereating or bulimia. For more information or a list of additional meetings throughout the U.S. and the world, call (781) 932-6300 or visitwww.foodaddicts.org.

  • Tuesdays 7 p.m.: Modesto Unity Church, 2547 Veneman Ave., Modesto.
  • Wednesdays 9 a.m.: The Episcopal Church of Saint Anne, 1020 W. Lincoln Road, Stockton.
  • Saturdays 9 a.m.: Tracy Community Church, 1790 Sequoia Blvd. at Corral Hollow, Tracy.

Diabetes: Basics to a Healthy Life

Wednesdays 10 a.m.: Free eight-class ongoing series every Wednesday except the month of September. Click here for detailsSt. Joseph’s Medical Center, Cleveland Classroom, 2102 N. California St., Stockton. Information: (209) 944-8355 or www.StJosephsCares.org/Diabetes.

Break From Stress

Wednesdays 6 to 7 p.m.: St. Joseph’s Medical Center offers the community a break from their stressful lives with Break from Stress sessions. These sessions are free, open to the public, with no pre-registration necessary. Just drop in, take a deep breath and relax through a variety of techniques. Break from Stress sessions are held in St. Joseph’s Cleveland Classroom (behind HealthCare Clinical Lab on California Street just north of the medical center. Information: SJCancerInfo@DignityHealth.org or (209) 467-6550.

Mother-Baby Breast Connection

Wednesdays 1 to 3 p.m.: Join a lactation consultant for support and advice on the challenges of early breastfeeding. Come meet other families and attend as often as you like. A different topic of interest will be offered each week with time for breastfeeding assistance and questions. Pre-registration is required. Call (209) 467-6331. St. Joseph’s Medical Center, Pavilion Conference Room (1st floor), 1800 N. California St., Stockton.

Adult Children With Aging Relatives

Second Wednesday of month 4:30 p.m.: Lodi Health offers an Adult Children with Aging Relatives support group at the Hutchins Street Square Senior Center. Information: (209) 369-4443 or (209) 369-6921.

Diabetes Support Group in Stockton

Third Wednesday of month 5:30 to 7 p.m.: This support group will help you deal with issues of diabetes through avoiding lifelong complications. Accomplished by increasing daily activities, learning to take your medications  properly, and overcoming depression, frustration and feeling alone. Each month there will be resources including dietitians, doctors, pharmacists and literature is available to assist you. Knowledge is power. This is a free program (no registration is required). Monthly meetings will be held at St. Joseph’s Medical Center, 1800 N. California St., Stockton, in the basement Classroom 3. Any questions or comments call Susan Sanchez, RN, Certified Diabetes Educator: (209) 662-9487.

Smoking Cessation Class in Lodi

Wednesdays 3 to 4 p.m.: Lodi Health offers an eight-session smoking-cessation class for those wishing to become smoke free. Classes are held weekly in the Lodi Health Pulmonary Rehabilitation Department at Lodi Memorial Hospital, 975 S. Fairmont Ave., Lodi. Topics covered include benefits of quitting; ways to cope with quitting; how to deal with a craving; medications that help with withdrawal; and creating a support system. Call the Lodi Health Lung Health Line at (209) 339-7445 to register.

Individual Stork Tours At Dameron

Wednesdays 5 to 7 p.m.: Dameron Hospital, 525 W. Acacia St., Stockton, offers 30 minute guided tours that provide expecting parents with a tour of Labor/Delivery, the Mother-Baby Unit and an overview of the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. New mothers are provided information on delivery services, where to go and what to do once delivery has arrived, and each mother can create an individual birthing plan. Information/registration: Carolyn Sanders, RN (209) 461-3136or www.Dameronhospital.org.

Brain Builders Weekly Program

Thursdays 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.: Lodi Health and the Hutchins Street Square Senior Center offer “Brain Builders,” a weekly program for people in the early stages of memory loss. There is a weekly fee of $25. Registration is required. Information or to register, call (209) 369-4443 or (209) 369-6921.

Infant CPR and Safety

Second Thursday of month 5 to 7 p.m.: Dameron Hospital, 525 W. Acacia St., Stockton, offers a class to family members to safely take care of their newborn.  Family members are taught infant CPR and relief of choking, safe sleep and car seat safety.  Regarding infant safety, the hospital offers on the fourth Thursday of each month from 5 to 7 p.m. a NICU/SCN family support group. This group is facilitated by a Master Prepared Clinical Social Worker and the Dameron NICU staff with visits from the hospital’s neonatologist. Information/registration: Carolyn Sanders, RN (209) 461-3136 or www.Dameronhospital.org.

Group Meetings for Alzheimer’s Patients, Caregivers

Thursdays 10 to 11:30 a.m.: The Alzheimer’s Aid Society of Northern California in conjunction with Villa Marche residential care facility conducts a simultaneous Caregiver’s Support Group and Patient’s Support Group at Villa Marche, 1119 Rosemarie Lane, Stockton. Caregivers, support people or family members of anyone with dementia are welcome to attend the caregiver’s group, led by Rita Vasquez. It’s a place to listen, learn and share. At the same time, Alzheimer’s and dementia patients can attend the patient’s group led by Sheryl Ashby. Participants will learn more about dementia and how to keep and enjoy the skills that each individual possesses. There will be brain exercises and reminiscence. The meeting is appropriate for anyone who enjoys socialization and is able to attend with moderate supervision. Information: (209) 477-4858.

Clase Gratuita de Diabetes en Español

Cada segundo Viernes del mes: Participantes aprenderán los fundamentos sobre la observación de azúcar de sangre, comida saludable, tamaños de porción y medicaciones. Un educador con certificado del control de diabetes dará instruccion sobre la autodirección durante de esta clase. Para mas información y registración:(209) 944-8355. Aprenda más de los programas de diabetes en el sitio electronico de St. Joseph’s: www.StJosephsCares.org/Diabetes

Nutrition on the Move Class

Fridays 11 a.m. to noon: Nutrition Education Center at Emergency Food Bank, 7 W. Scotts Ave., Stockton.  Free classes are general nutrition classes where you’ll learn about the new My Plate standards, food label reading, nutrition and exercise, eating more fruits and vegetables, and other tips. Information: (209) 464-7369or www.stocktonfoodbank.org.

Crystal Meth Anonymous Recovery Group

Fridays 6 p.m.: St. Joseph’s Behavioral Health (in trailer at the rear of building), 2510 N. California St., Stockton. Information: (209) 461-2000.

Free Diabetes Class in Spanish

Second Friday of every month: Participants will learn the basics about blood sugar monitoring, healthy foods, portion sizes, medications and self-management skills from a certified diabetic educator during this free class. St. Joseph’s Medical Center, 1800 N. California St., Stockton. Information and registration: (209) 944-8355. Learn more on St. Joseph’s diabetes programs at www.StJosephsCares.org/Diabetes.

National Alliance on Mental Health: Family-to-Family Education

Saturdays 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.: NAMI presents a free series of 12 weekly education classes for friends and family of people with major depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder, borderline personality disorder, panic disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, and co-occurring brain disorders. Classes will be held at 530 W. Acacia St., Stockton (across from Dameron Hospital) on the second floor. Information or to register: (209) 468-3755.

Multiple Sclerosis Self-Help Group

Second Saturday of Every Month 10 a.m. to noon: Multiple Sclerosis Self-Help Group meeting are for family, friends, caregivers and individuals with multiple sclerosis. We invite you to join us for a few moments of exchanging ideas and management skills to help you live and work with multiple sclerosis, a chronic disease. Meetings are at St. Joseph’s Medical Center, 1800 N. California St., Stockton, in Classroom 1 in the basement. Information: Laurie (209) 915-1730 or Velma (209) 951-2264.

All Day Prepared Childbirth Class

Third Saturday of month 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.: Dameron Hospital, 525 W. Acacia St., Stockton, offers community service educational class of prebirth education and mentoring. Information/registration: Carolyn Sanders, RN (209) 461-3136 or www.Dameronhospital.org.

Big Brother/Big Sister

Second Sunday of month: Dameron Hospital, 525 W. Acacia St., Stockton, has a one-hour class meeting designed specifically for newborn’s siblings. Topics include family role, a labor/delivery tour and a video presentation which explains hand washing/germ control and other household hygiene activities. This community service class ends with a Certification of Completion certificate. Information/registration: Carolyn Sanders, RN (209) 461-3136 or www.Dameronhospital.org.

Outpatient Program Aimed at Teens

Two programs: Adolescents face a number of challenging issues while trying to master their developmental milestones. Mental health issues (including depression), substance abuse and family issues can hinder them from mastering the developmental milestones that guide them into adulthood. The Adolescent Intensive Outpatient Program (IOP) offered by St. Joseph’s Behavioral Health Center, 2510 N. California St., Stockton, is designed for those individuals who need comprehensive treatment for their mental, emotional or chemical dependency problems. This program uses Dialectical Behavioral Therapy to present skills for effective living. Patients learn how to identify and change distorted thinking, communicate effectively in relationships and regain control of their lives. The therapists work collaboratively with parents, doctors and schools. They also put together a discharge plan so the patient continues to get the help they need to thrive into adulthood.

  • Psychiatric Adolescent IOP meets Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays from 4 to 7:30 p.m.
  • Chemical Recovery Adolescent IOP meets Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays from 4 to 7 p.m.

For more information about this and other groups, (209) 461-2000 and ask to speak with a behavioral evaluator or visit www.StJosephsCanHelp.org.

Stork Tours in Lodi

Parents-to-be are offered individual tours of the Lodi Memorial Hospital Maternity Department, 975 S. Fairmont Ave., Lodi. Prospective parents may view the labor, delivery and recovery areas of the hospital and ask questions of the nursing staff. Phone (209) 339-7879 to schedule a tour. For more information on other classes offered by Lodi Health, visit www.lodihealth.org.

HOSPITALS and MEDICAL GROUPS

Community Medical Centers

Click here for Community Medical Centers (Channel Medical Clinic, San Joaquin Valley Dental Group, etc.) website.

Dameron Hospital Events

Click here for Dameron Hospital’s Event Calendar.

Doctors Hospital of Manteca Events

Click here for Doctors Hospital of Manteca Events finder.

Hill Physicians

Click here for Hill Physicians website.

Kaiser Permanente Central Valley

Click here for Kaiser Central Valley News and Events

Lodi Memorial Hospital

Click here for Lodi Memorial Hospital.

Mark Twain Medical Center

Click here for Mark Twain Medical Center in San Andreas.

Planned Parenthood Mar Monte

Click here to find a Planned Parenthood Health Center near you.

San Joaquin General Hospital

Click here for San Joaquin General Hospital website.

St. Joseph’s Medical Center Classes and Events

Click here for St. Joseph’s Medical Center’s Classes and Events.

Sutter Gould Medical Foundation

Click here for Sutter Gould news. Click here for Sutter Gould calendar of events.

Sutter Tracy Community Hospital Education and Support

Click here for Sutter Tracy Community Hospital events, classes and support groups.

PUBLIC HEALTH

San Joaquin County Public Health Services General Information

Ongoing resources for vaccinations and clinic information are:

  1. Public Health Services Influenza website, www.sjcphs.org
  2. Recorded message line at (209) 469-8200, extension 2# for English and 3# for Spanish.
  3. For further information, individuals may call the following numbers at Public Health Services:
  • For general vaccine and clinic questions, call (209) 468-3862;
  • For medical questions, call (209) 468-3822.

Health officials continue to recommend these precautionary measures to help protect against acquiring influenza viruses:

  1. Wash your hands often with soap and water or use alcohol based sanitizers.
  2. Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue or your sleeve, when you cough or sneeze.
  3. Stay home if you are sick until you are free of a fever for 24 hours.
  4. Get vaccinated.

Public Health Services Clinic Schedules (Adults and Children)

Immunization clinic hours are subject to change depending on volume of patients or staffing. Check the Public Health Services website for additional evening clinics or special clinics at www.sjcphs.org. Clinics with an asterisk (*) require patients to call for an appointment.

Stockton Health Center: 1601 E. Hazelton Ave.; (209) 468-3830.

  • Immunizations: Monday 1-4 p.m.; Tuesday 1-4 p.m.; Wednesday 10 a.m.-1 p.m.; Thursday 8-11 a.m. and 1-4 p.m.; Friday 8-11 a.m.
  • Travel clinic*: Thursday 8-11 a.m. and 1 to 4 p.m.
  • Health exams*: Tuesday 1-4 p.m.; Wednesday 10 a.m.-1 p.m.; Friday 8-11 a.m.
  • Sexually transmitted disease clinic: Wednesday 3-6 p.m. and Friday 1-4 p.m., walk-in and by appointment.
  • Tuberculosis clinic*: Tuesday; second and fourth Wednesday of the month.
  • HIV testing: Tuesday 1-4 p.m.; Thursday 1-4 p.m.

Manteca Health Center: 124 Sycamore Ave.; (209) 823-7104 or (800) 839-4949.

  • Immunizations: Wednesday 10 a.m.-1 p.m. and 3-6 p.m.
  • Tuberculosis clinic*: first and third Wednesday 3-6 p.m.
  • HIV testing: first Wednesday 1:30-4 p.m.

Lodi Health Center: 300 W. Oak St.; (209) 331-7303 or (800) 839-4949.

  • Immunizations: Friday 8-11 a.m. and 1-4 p.m.
  • Tuberculosis clinic*: Friday 8-11 a.m. and 1-4 p.m.
  • HIV testing: second and fourth Friday 1:30-4 p.m.

WIC (Women, Infants & Children) Program

Does your food budget need a boost? The WIC Program can help you stretch your food dollars. This special supplemental food program for women, infants and children serves low-income women who are currently pregnant or have recently delivered, breastfeeding moms, infants, and children up to age 5. Eligible applicants receive monthly checks to use at any authorized grocery store for wholesome foods such as fruits and vegetables, milk and cheese, whole-grain breads and cereals, and more. WIC shows you how to feed your family to make them healthier and brings moms and babies closer together by helping with breastfeeding. WIC offers referrals to low-cost or free health care and other community services depending on your needs. WIC services may be obtained at a variety of locations throughout San Joaquin County:

Stockton (209) 468-3280

  • Public Health Services WIC Main Office, 1145 N. Hunter St.: Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Wednesday 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.; open two Saturdays a month.
  • Family Health Center, 1414 N. California St.: Wednesday 8 a.m. to noon, 1 to 5 p.m.
  • CUFF (Coalition United for Families), 2044 Fair St.: Thursday 8 a.m. to noon, 1 to 5 p.m.
  • Taylor Family Center, 1101 Lever Blvd.: Wednesday 8 a.m. to noon, 1 to 4 p.m.
  • Transcultural Clinic, 4422 N. Pershing Ave. Suite D-5: Tuesday 8 a.m. to noon, 1 to 5 p.m.

Manteca  (209) 823-7104

  • Public Health Services, 124 Sycamore Lane: Tuesday, Thursday, Friday 8 a.m. to noon, 1 to 5 p.m.

Tracy (209) 831-5930

  • Public Health Services, 205 W. Ninth St.: Monday, Wednesday 8 a.m. to noon, 1 to 5 p.m.

Flu Shots in Calaveras County

Fall brings cooler temperatures and the start of the flu season. Getting flu vaccine early offers greater protection throughout flu season. The Calaveras County Public Health Department recommends everyone 6 months of age and older get flu vaccine every year. Flu season can start as early as October and continue through March. “Seasonal flu can be serious,” said Dr. Dean Kelaita, Calaveras County health officer. “Every year people die from the flu.” Some children, youth and adults are at risk of serious illness and possibly death if they are not protected from the flu. They need to get flu vaccine now.

  • Adults 50 years of age and over.
  • Pregnant women.
  • Children and youth 5-18 years on long-term aspirin therapy.
  • Everyone with chronic health conditions (including diabetes, kidney, heart or lung disease).

If you care for an infant less than 6 months or people with chronic health conditions, you can help protect them by getting your flu vaccine. Even if you had a flu vaccination last year, you need another one this year to be protected and to protect others who are at risk. The Public Health Department will offer five community flu clinics:

  • Every Monday (3 to 5:30 p.m.) and Thursday (8 a.m. to noon): Calaveras County Public Health, 700 Mountain Ranch Road, Suite C2, San Andreas. The monthly Valley Springs Immunization Clinic (third Tuesday, 3 to 5:30 pm) will also offer flu vaccine during flu season.

The flu vaccine is $16.  Medicare Part B is accepted.  No one will be denied service due to inability to pay. For more information about the vaccine or the clinics, contact the Public Health Department at (209) 754-6460 or visit the Public Health website at www.calaveraspublichealth.com.

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What You Need to Know About Joe’s Health Calendar

Have a health-oriented event the public in San Joaquin County should know about? Let me know at jgoldeen@recordnet.com and I’ll get it into my Health Calendar. I’m not interested in promoting commercial enterprises here, but I am interested in helping out nonprofit and/or community groups, hospitals, clinics, physicians and other health-care providers. Look for five categories: Community Events, News, Ongoing, Hospitals & Medical Groups, and Public Health. TO THE PUBLIC: I won’t list an item here from a source that I don’t know or trust. So I believe you can count on what you read here. If there is a problem, please don’t hesitate to let me know at (209) 546-8278 or jgoldeen@recordnet.com. Thanks, Joe

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Joe’s Health Calendar June 29

COMMUNITY EVENTS

Celebrate – Eat Smart in North Stockton

June 30 (Tuesday) 12:30 to 1:30 p.m.: San Joaquin County Public Health Services is offering free nutrition classes at Diamond Cove II, 5506 Tam O’Shanter Drive, Stockton. Each week a different topic will be covered, but participants can join at any time and no registration is required. Classes are open to the public and will include free healthy tools and food tastings. You will learn to: prepare new healthy recipes; make your food dollars count; understand food labels; eat more fruits and vegetables; build strong bones; and increase physical activity. Free cookbooks and take-home items. Information: (209) 468-3821. Funded by USDA SNAP-Ed, an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Build Strong Bones in Manteca

June 30 (Tuesday) 4 to 5 p.m.: San Joaquin County Public Health Services is offering free nutrition classes at Manteca Public Library, 320 W. Center St., Manteca. Each week a different topic will be covered, but participants can join at any time and no registration is required. Classes are open to the public and will include free healthy tools and food tastings. You will learn to: prepare new healthy recipes; make your food dollars count; understand food labels; eat more fruits and vegetables; build strong bones; and increase physical activity. Free cookbooks and take-home items. Information: (209) 468-3821. Funded by USDA SNAP-Ed, an equal opportunity provider and employer.

VA Palo Alto Hosts Open House for Vets, Community

June 30 (Tuesday) 5 to 6:30 p.m.: VA Palo Alto Health Care System (VAPAHCS) will be holding an Open House at its Palo Alto Division, 3801 Miranda Ave., Palo Alto. This will be a special event as Department of Veterans Affairs begins its Summer of Service campaign around the nation. The focus of the event will be leveraging community partnerships to achieve VA and VAPAHCS’ goals. This summer, VA is renewing its commitment to America’s veterans, and asking for community partners to help in honoring that commitment.  VAPAHCS will be inviting not only veterans but also community partners and stakeholders to visit its Palo Alto campus for an open house with representation from the health care system, Veteran Benefits Administration and National Cemetery Administration.  VA’s partners can also help by getting the word out this summer that VA is a great place to work, with one of the best missions, serving the best clients – veterans. For more information, those interested can visit http://mycareeratva.va.gov/  or http://www.usajobs.gov. Those who cannot attend are encouraged to visit www.paloalto.va.gov,www.facebook.com/vapahcs,  or www.twitter.com/vapaloaltoto follow events and to learn more about how they can support veterans.

Go Lean With Protein in Manteca

July 7 (Tuesday) 4 to 5 p.m.: San Joaquin County Public Health Services is offering free nutrition classes at Manteca Public Library, 320 W. Center St., Manteca. Each week a different topic will be covered, but participants can join at any time and no registration is required. Classes are open to the public and will include free healthy tools and food tastings. You will learn to: prepare new healthy recipes; make your food dollars count; understand food labels; eat more fruits and vegetables; build strong bones; and increase physical activity. Free cookbooks and take-home items. Information: (209) 468-3821. Funded by USDA SNAP-Ed, an equal opportunity provider and employer

Build Strong Bones in East Stockton

July 10 (Friday) noon to 1 p.m.: San Joaquin County Public Health Services is offering free nutrition classes at Health Net Community Center, 678 N. Wilson Way, Suite 16 (Eastland Plaza), Stockton. Each week a different topic will be covered, but participants can join at any time and no registration is required. Classes are open to the public and will include free healthy tools and food tastings. You will learn to: prepare new healthy recipes; make your food dollars count; understand food labels; eat more fruits and vegetables; build strong bones; and increase physical activity. Free cookbooks and take-home items. Information: (209) 468-3821. Funded by USDA SNAP-Ed, an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Make a Change in Manteca

July 14 (Tuesday) 4 to 5 p.m.: San Joaquin County Public Health Services is offering free nutrition classes at Manteca Public Library, 320 W. Center St., Manteca. Each week a different topic will be covered, but participants can join at any time and no registration is required. Classes are open to the public and will include free healthy tools and food tastings. You will learn to: prepare new healthy recipes; make your food dollars count; understand food labels; eat more fruits and vegetables; build strong bones; and increase physical activity. Free cookbooks and take-home items. Information: (209) 468-3821. Funded by USDA SNAP-Ed, an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Go Lean With Protein in East Stockton

July 17 (Friday) noon to 1 p.m.: San Joaquin County Public Health Services is offering free nutrition classes at Health Net Community Center, 678 N. Wilson Way, Suite 16 (Eastland Plaza), Stockton. Each week a different topic will be covered, but participants can join at any time and no registration is required. Classes are open to the public and will include free healthy tools and food tastings. You will learn to: prepare new healthy recipes; make your food dollars count; understand food labels; eat more fruits and vegetables; build strong bones; and increase physical activity. Free cookbooks and take-home items. Information: (209) 468-3821. Funded by USDA SNAP-Ed, an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Healthy Eating Active Living Quarterly Meeting

July 21 (Tuesday) 9 a.m. to noon: This quarter’s meeting at South Sacramento Christian Center, 7710 Stockton Blvd., Sacramento, will explore the Smarter Lunchrooms Movement and the EatFresh.org Resource. Please join us as we share best practices, exchange information and explore mutual interventions and cooperative efforts to provide nutrition and obesity prevention services. Participation is open to anyone interested in working collaboratively to improve the health of communities within the Delta and Gold Country Region of California. Registration is encouraged. CLICK HERE, For more information, please contact Lara Falkenstein.

Celebrate – Eat Smart in Manteca

July 21 (Tuesday) 4 to 5 p.m.: San Joaquin County Public Health Services is offering free nutrition classes at Manteca Public Library, 320 W. Center St., Manteca. Each week a different topic will be covered, but participants can join at any time and no registration is required. Classes are open to the public and will include free healthy tools and food tastings. You will learn to: prepare new healthy recipes; make your food dollars count; understand food labels; eat more fruits and vegetables; build strong bones; and increase physical activity. Free cookbooks and take-home items. Information: (209) 468-3821. Funded by USDA SNAP-Ed, an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Make a Change in East Stockton

July 24 (Friday) noon to 1 p.m.: San Joaquin County Public Health Services is offering free nutrition classes at Health Net Community Center, 678 N. Wilson Way, Suite 16 (Eastland Plaza), Stockton. Each week a different topic will be covered, but participants can join at any time and no registration is required. Classes are open to the public and will include free healthy tools and food tastings. You will learn to: prepare new healthy recipes; make your food dollars count; understand food labels; eat more fruits and vegetables; build strong bones; and increase physical activity. Free cookbooks and take-home items. Information: (209) 468-3821. Funded by USDA SNAP-Ed, an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Celebrate – Eat Smart in East Stockton

July 31 (Friday) noon to 1 p.m.: San Joaquin County Public Health Services is offering free nutrition classes at Health Net Community Center, 678 N. Wilson Way, Suite 16 (Eastland Plaza), Stockton. Each week a different topic will be covered, but participants can join at any time and no registration is required. Classes are open to the public and will include free healthy tools and food tastings. You will learn to: prepare new healthy recipes; make your food dollars count; understand food labels; eat more fruits and vegetables; build strong bones; and increase physical activity. Free cookbooks and take-home items. Information: (209) 468-3821. Funded by USDA SNAP-Ed, an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Free Health & Vision Fair in Stockton

Sept. 18 (Friday) 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.: The eighth annual Health & Vision Fair sponsored by the Community Center for the Blind, 130 W. Flora St., Stockton, will offer free vision screenings, hearing evaluations, blood pressure checks, goodies and giveaways. Bring your family. Many of Stockton’s resources and agencies will be represented. The Lions’ Eye Mobile will be on site. Information: (209) 466-3836.

Celebration on Central (Lodi) for Bi-National Health Week

Sept. 27 (Sunday) 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.: Up to 60 agencies will be providing information, free health screenings, arts and crafts activities, face painting, amusing clowns, free food, live entertainment, raffle prizes and agencies interacting with children and families at the Celebration on Central at Joe Serna Jr. Charter School, 29 S. Central Ave., Lodi.

Free Multicultural Health and Community Fair in Stockton

Oct. 10 (Saturday) 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.: West Lane Oaks Family Resource Center, part of the Community Partnership for Families of San Joaquin County, is planning its eighth Annual Multicultural Health and Community Fair at the Normandy Village Shopping Center, northeast corner of Hammer and West lanes, Stockton, in the parking lot adjacent to Carl’s Jr. We hope that you can join us this year and help to make our event a success. The goal of the Multicultural Health and Community Fair is to educate the community on where and how to find resources and programs through the various agencies in attendance and to celebrate our cultural diversity. Over 50 agencies participated at last year’s event. These agencies, such as social service agencies, health providers and financial planning, provided free services and assisted families with their various needs. We also provided activities for children. Over 600 families attended our event last year, and this year we hope to attract more than 1,000 families. Information: (209) 644-8619.

Celebrate Care Givers With an Inner Safari

Nov. 14 (Saturday) 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.: Healings in Motion presents its annual day to honor and recognize care givers: An Inner Safari – A Joyful Day to Relax, Retool and Renew. Event will be held at Robert Cabral Agricultural Center, 2101 E. Earhart Drive, Stockton. Information and registration: Click here.

CareVan Offers Free Mobile Health Clinic

St. Joseph’s Medical Center CareVan offers a free health clinic for low-income and no-insurance individuals or families, 16 years old and older. Mobile health care services will be available to handle most minor urgent health care needs such as mild burns, bumps, abrasions, sprains, sinus and urinary tract infections, cold and flu. No narcotics prescriptions will be available. Information: (209) 461-3471 or www.StJosephsCares.org/CarevanClinic schedule is subject to change without notice. Walk-In appointments are available.

  • Tuesdays 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.: Dollar General, 310 W. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., Stockton.
  • Wednesdays & Thursdays 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.: For those 16 and older only; San Joaquin County Fairgrounds, 1658 S. Airport Way, Stockton.

ER Wait Watcher: Which ER Will See You the Fastest?

Heading to the emergency room? ProPublica provides a great tool to help. You may wait a while before a doctor or other treating professional sees you — and the hospital nearest to you might not be the one that sees you the fastest. Click here to look up average ER wait times, as reported by hospitals to the federal government, as well as the time it takes to get there in current traffic, as reported by Google.

Farmers Markets In San Joaquin County

San Joaquin County Public Health Services Network for a Healthy California program has developed a list of San Joaquin County Farmers Markets as part of its goal to increase fruit and vegetable consumption. Click here for the latest list of farmers markets around San Joaquin County, including times and locations.

NEWS

Need Help in San Joaquin County? Call 2-1-1

Have no money for food? Just lost your job? Sick and need a health clinic? Depressed? How do I file taxes? Call 2-1-1 for help. Click here for the flier.

AMA Strengthens Youth Policy on E-Cigarettes

With the growing popularity of electronic cigarettes among the nation’s youth, the American Medical Association (AMA) adopted new policy to further strengthen its support of regulatory oversight of electronic cigarettes. The policy calls for the passage of laws and regulations that would: set the minimum legal purchase age for electronic cigarettes and their liquid nicotine refills at 21 years old; require liquid nicotine to be packaged in child-resistant containers; and urge strict enforcement of laws prohibiting the sale of tobacco products to minors. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s 2014 National Youth Tobacco Survey, e-cigarette use among middle and high school students tripled from 2013 to 2014. The survey data showed e-cigarette use among high school students increased from 4.5 percent in 2013 to 13.4 percent in 2014 – an increase from approximately 660,000 to 2 million students. Among middle school students, the data indicated that e-cigarette use more than tripled from 1.1 percent in 2013 to 3.9 percent in 2014 – an increase from approximately 120,000 to 450,000 students. “The AMA continues to advocate for more stringent policies to protect our country’s youth from the dangers of tobacco use and improve public health. The AMA’s newest policy expands on the AMA’s longtime efforts to help keep all tobacco products, including electronic cigarettes, out of the hands of young people, by urging laws to deter the sale of electronic cigarettes to anyone under the age of 21,” AMA President Dr. Robert Wah said. “We also urge the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to act now to implement its proposed rule to effectively regulate electronic cigarettes.” The new policy extends existing AMA policy adopted in 2013 and 2014 calling for all electronic cigarettes to be subject to the same regulations and oversight that the FDA applies to tobacco and nicotine products, seeking tighter marketing restrictions on manufacturers, and prohibiting claims that electronic cigarettes are effective tobacco cessation tools. “Improving the health of the nation is AMA’s top priority and we will continue to advocate for policies that help reduce the burden of preventable diseases like cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes, both of which can be linked to smoking,” Wah said.

Valley Children’s, Stanford Partner on Pediatric Programs

Valley Children’s Healthcare of Madera and Stanford University School of Medicine will partner to create a graduate medical education program based at Valley Children’s Hospital. “Valley Children’s is taking the lead in training the next generation of pediatricians and pediatric surgical and medical specialists,” said Dr. David Christensen, Valley Children’s chief medical officer. “With Stanford as our academic partner, we’ll prepare doctors to continue providing the highest quality medical care for children.” The “Valley Children’s Pediatric Residency Program, Affiliated with Stanford University School of Medicine” will allow Valley Children’s residents to have rotations and learning opportunities at the Palo Alto campus and for Stanford’s residents to learn here. The fellowship program at Valley Children’s will be the first of its kind in the Valley. It will train doctors to become pediatric subspecialists, building on the highest quality of exceptional care in service lines like pediatric surgery, gastroenterology and emergency medicine. “We are excited about the opportunity to partner with Valley Children’s in the creation of a new, pediatric-focused teaching program in Central California and for our current residents and fellows to rotate at Valley Children’s,” said Dr. Lloyd Minor, dean of the Stanford University School of Medicine. “Valley Children’s is one of the largest children’s hospitals in California and has the state’s busiest emergency department for patients younger than 21 years of age. By spending time there, our residents will have the opportunity to see a wide variety of complex and critically ill patients in a short period of time.” A unique aspect of the Pediatric Residency and Fellowship programs will be Valley Children’s partnership with hospitals and medical groups throughout the area. Valley Children’s residents and fellows will have the opportunity for rotations at partner locations – including Kaiser Permanente and Saint Agnes Medical Center in Fresno and Dignity Health – and local pediatricians’ offices. “These relationships are key to the success of our program,” said Valley Children’s President and CEO Todd Suntrapak. “One of our goals is to attract pediatricians and subspecialists to our area and keep them here. That means more Valley families will have access to the care they need, right where they live. One of the best ways we can do this is by exposing our residents and fellows to the diverse practice opportunities that exist in the Central Valley. We are grateful that so many groups are committed to helping Valley Children’s train the next generation of pediatricians and pediatric specialists.” Leading the new program is Valley Children’s Chief of Pediatrics Dr. Jolie Limon. Limon joined Valley Children’s as a pediatric hospitalist in 2000. She has won numerous teaching awards during her tenure and her areas of expertise include resident leadership and interprofessional education. “This is an exciting time,” Limon said. “I look forward to building a program that not only trains exceptional pediatricians but also creates future leaders in pediatric care for the Valley. Valley Children’s Hospital has a wealth of wonderful clinicians, educators and patients by which to sustain an amazing training program.” Valley Children’s Hospital will continue to serve as a teaching site for more than 190 residents and medical students in a dozen other programs, including those based at Kaweah Delta Health Care District in Visalia, Mercy Medical Center in Merced and Clinica Sierra Vista in Fresno.

California Endowment Unveils New Website

The California Endowment, the state’s largest health foundation, today unveiled its new website – designed to bring more tools and features to its users, and allowing The Endowment to better connect with its many partner organizations, as well as thought leaders and the people of California. “Our new site is an important engine to support The Endowment’s work to transform communities across California, and improve the fundamental health status of all Californians,” said Dr. Robert Ross, M.D., chief executive officer. “The site’s new features allow us to reach more people and ultimately help realize more change throughout California.” The website offers a fresh design and fully integrates with today’s digital environment. It’s mobile friendly and easily accessible with new tools, interactive graphics, timely information and links to The Endowment’s social media platforms. Please visit the site at www.calendow.org.

Top Chronic Conditions: 11 Million and Counting

 SEE THE REPORT

GET THE CHARTS

Chronic conditions are the leading cause of death and disability in the United States, and the biggest contributor to health care costs. But there is wide variation in their incidence, with major differences depending on age, income, race and ethnicity, and insurance status. In addition, many Californians with chronic conditions are delaying needed care because of cost. Californians with the Top Chronic Conditions: 11 Million and Counting looks at five major chronic conditions — asthma, diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure, and serious psychological distress — and how each of these affects Californians. Among the key findings:

  • About 40% of adults reported having at least one of the five chronic conditions studied.
  • High blood pressure is the most common chronic condition, affecting about one in four, or 7.6 million, adults in California.
  • As income rises, the prevalence of chronic conditions falls. Adults living under 138% of the federal poverty level were more likely to have two or more chronic conditions (14%) than those in the highest income group, 400%+ of the federal poverty level (8%).
  • Of Californians with psychological distress, 34% delayed needed medical care, and 27% delayed filling prescriptions. Cost or lack of insurance was frequently cited as the reason for these delays.
  • Of Californians age 65 or older, 70% have at least one chronic condition, compared to 26% of those age 18 to 39.

See the complete report and charts now.

This report is published as part of the CHCF California Health Care Almanac, an online clearinghouse for key data and analysis examining California’s health care marketplace. Find all Almanac reports at www.chcf.org/almanac.

Resources to Help You Better Understand Stem Cell Science

The International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) has launched an expanded “Closer Look at Stem Cells” website www.closerlookatstemcells.org , an online resource to help patients and their families make informed decisions about stem cell treatments, clinics and their health. The ISSCR, a global membership-based organization comprised of approximately 4,000 stem cell researchers, clinicians and ethicists, is concerned that stem cell treatments are being marketed by clinics around the world without appropriate oversight and patient protections in place to ensure safety and likely benefit. New resources on the website emphasize key scientific principles and practices that will help the public to better evaluate treatment claims. “The ‘Closer Look at Stem Cells’ website is a direct channel from researchers to the public,” said Megan Munsie, a scientist with Stem Cells Australia and chairperson of the ISSCR task force responsible for the website expansion. “Promising clinical trials are under way for many diseases and conditions, but most stem cell-based treatments are still in the future. We hope that the website will foster interest and excitement in the science, but also an understanding of the current limitations of stem cells as medicine and a healthy skepticism of clinics selling treatments.” The website, once patient focused, is now a comprehensive destination for those interested in stem cell science and research being conducted across the globe. It includes informational pages on basic stem cell biology, the process by which science becomes medicine, clinical trials and the use of stem cells in understanding specific health conditions – macular degeneration, multiple sclerosis, heart disease and diabetes. Pages on other conditions will be added in the coming months. It is also home to the “Stem Cells in Focus” blog, which seeks to make cutting-edge research from the stem cell field accessible to non-scientists. “I am often contacted by patients struggling with very difficult decisions about their health, and who want to know more about the potential of stem cells,” said Larry Goldstein, a stem cell scientist at the University of California, San Diego and a member of the ISSCR task force responsible for the website expansion. “My experience is that understanding the current state of stem cell science and medicine is key to making informed decisions about stem cell treatments, and so I encourage patients to start their journey on the ‘Closer Look at Stem Cells’ website.”

California Debuts Ads to Counter E-Cigarettes

Twenty-five years after launching the first anti-smoking advertisements in the state, the California Department of Public Health on March 23 premiered a series of television, digital, and outdoor ads in a new campaign called “Wake Up,” as part of its educational effort to inform the public about the dangers of e-cigarettes. “California has been a world leader in tobacco use prevention and cessation since 1990, with one of the lowest youth and adult smoking rates in the nation. The aggressive marketing and escalating use of e-cigarettes threatens to erode that progress,” said Dr. Karen Smith, newly appointed CDPH director and state health officer. CDPH recently released a report and health advisory highlighting areas of concern regarding e-cigarettes, including the sharp rise in e-cigarette use among California teens and young adults, the highly addictive nature of nicotine in e-cigarettes, the surge in accidental nicotine poisonings occurring in young children, and that secondhand e-cigarette emissions contain several toxic chemicals. Research shows that youth and young adults who use e-cigarettes are far more likely to also use traditional cigarettes and other tobacco products. “Our advertising campaign is telling the public to ‘wake up’ to the fact that these are highly addictive products being mass marketed,” said Dr. Smith. The advertising campaign includes two television ads that feature songs from the 1950s and ‘60s and images portraying the health risks of e-cigarettes. One TV ad underscores the e-cigarette industry’s use of candy flavored ‘e-juice’ and products that entice the next generation to become addicted to nicotine. The second TV spot emphasizes the dangers and addictiveness of e-cigarettes, while exposing the fact that big tobacco companies are in the e-cigarette business. E-cigarettes are largely unregulated at the federal level and companies are not required to disclose what is in their products or how they are made. To inform the public about the dangers of e-cigarettes, CDPH launched an educational campaign in late January. The advertising component kicked off on March 23 and runs through June 2015, with TV and digital ads on websites, online radio and social media throughout the state. Outdoor ads, including billboards, at gas stations and in malls, and ads in movie theaters will be phased in throughout the campaign. This counter e-cigarette advertising campaign is part of CDPH’s ongoing anti- tobacco media efforts. In addition to the advertising, the CDPH educational campaign will include:

  • Partnering with the local public health, medical, and child care organizations to increase awareness about the known toxicity of e-cigarettes and the high risk of poisonings, especially to children, while continuing to promote and support the use of proven effective cessation therapies.
  • Joining with the California Department of Education and school officials to assist in providing accurate information to parents, students, teachers, and school administrators on the dangers of e-cigarettes.

The California Tobacco Control Program was established by the Tobacco Tax and Health Protection Act of 1988. The act, approved by California voters, instituted a 25-cent tax on each pack of cigarettes and earmarked 5 cents of that tax to fund California’s tobacco control efforts. These efforts include supporting local health departments and community organizations, a media campaign, and evaluation and surveillance. California’s comprehensive approach has changed social norms around tobacco use and secondhand smoke. California’s tobacco control efforts have reduced both adult and youth smoking rates by 50 percent, saved more than 1 million lives and have resulted in $134 billion worth of savings in health care costs. Learn more at TobaccoFreeCA.com.

Manteca Unified Students Learn Hands-Only CPR

Knowing the importance of quick action upon a person experiencing sudden cardiac arrest, the hands-only CPR push was created by Manteca Unified School District Health Services’ Caroline Thibodeau and Secondary Education’s Tevani Liotard along with Manteca District Ambulance Service’s Jonathan Mendoza. Other agencies who take part are Manteca Fire Department, Lathrop-Manteca Fire Department and Stockton Fire Department. The group has presented a hands-Only CPR lecture and hands-on demonstration to all MUSD ninth-grade students. The lecture and presentation has been used throughout the MUSD high schools over the past 16 months. A total of 2,794 students and 73 adults have been taught the hands-only CPR to date. By the end of the school year, the number will increase to more than 3,500 students. All students get to experience hands-on by doing chest compression on a mannequin plus hearing and seeing the importance of quickly starting hands- only CPR quickly till help arrives. Paramedics, firefighters and teachers assist the students during the mannequin chest compression portion.  a majority of the students say, “Doing chest compressions is harder than I thought, but, I now feel I can do it or tell someone how to do it.” In December, a student at Manteca High School collapsed in the middle of class experiencing a sudden cardiac arrest.  Due to the quick action of the vice principal, Manteca Police Department resource officer, Manteca District Ambulance EMTs and paramedics, Manteca firefighters and continuous care at St. Joseph’s Medical Center and Stanford Hospital, this student is alive and has fully recovered.

Comprehensive Website Aims to Reduce Health Disparities

Welltopia, a new website launched by the California Department of Health Care Services and the UC Davis Institute for Population Health Improvement, offers a wide range of essential resources to help Californians, especially those on limited incomes, build healthier lives and communities. Designed to complement the popularWelltopia by DHCS Facebook page, the new website at MyWelltopia.com serves as a comprehensive resource connecting individuals, families and communities to credible information that addresses the social determinants of health and other leading causes of preventable death. Many studies have shown that access to health care, education, employment, housing, nutritious foods and physical activity are among the fundamental drivers of health for individuals and their communities. Making reliable information and resources available for people of all ages is key to creating healthy environments. “We developed Welltopia to be a convenient and trusted source of information covering all three aspects of health — physical, mental and well-being,” said Neal Kohatsu, DHCS medical director. “We’ve made every effort to ensure that the resources are both accurate and accessible to consumers.” The Welltopia site organizes information into five categories — Well Body, Well Mind, Jobs & Training, Health Insurance, and Basic Needs. It includes information on nutrition, physical activity, smoking cessation, alcohol- and drug-abuse prevention, stress management, health insurance, residency and social services, among others. The site also contains videos, photos and graphics with information about health-related programs. There are free applications, such as fitness trackers, women’s health information, recipes and food journals to track daily calorie intake, and links to CalFresh, education, job placement resources and other social services. “Welltopia should be the first stop for persons seeking reliable information about the many determinants of health,” said Kenneth Kizer, IPHI director. “Its friendly format quickly guides users to practical and trustworthy sources.” The Department of Health Care Services manages California’s form of Medicaid, known as Medi-Cal, which helps millions of low-income Californians obtain access to affordable, high-quality health care, including medical, dental, mental health, substance use disorder services, and long-term services and supports. DHCS aims to preserve and improve the health of all Californians. The UC Davis Institute for Population Health Improvement fosters population health within the UC Davis Health System and communities throughout the state. IPHI’s mission is to create, apply and disseminate knowledge about the many determinants of health to improve health and health security, and to support activities that improve health equity and eliminate health disparities.

Protect Your Family From E-Cigarettes

Read some facts from the California Department of Public Health. To learn more, click here.

HICAP Seeking Volunteers to Counsel Seniors on Medicare

HICAP – the Health Insurance Counseling and Advocacy Program – is a nonprofit organization dedicated to helping Medicare beneficiaries navigate the Medicare maze.  We do this in one-on-one counseling sessions, with registered HICAP volunteer counselors. HICAP counselors help Medicare beneficiaries: understand Medicare; compare supplemental policies; review HMO and PPO benefits; learn about government assistance programs; prepare appeals and challenge denials, and clarify rights as a health care consumer.  Our services are always free and always unbiased.  We neither sell nor recommend specific insurance companies.  Rather, we educate beneficiaries to make the choice best for their needs. We are looking for energetic seniors who are computer-savvy, interested in learning, and good communicators.  We will conduct training in San Joaquin County soon.  If you are interested in learning more about HICAP volunteering, contact HICAP at (209) 470-7812.

Breastfeeding and Working

The Breastfeeding Coalition of San Joaquin County offers its “Working & Breastfeeding” Toolkit at BreastfeedSJC.org. This toolkit contains tips, answers to frequently asked questions and links to online resources for families and employers. Jump on over to BreastfeedSJC.org/Working-and-Breastfeeding to check it out.

Diabetes Resources in San Joaquin County

Diabetes is a costly disease, both in terms of people’s health and well-being, and in terms of dollars spent on treatment, medications and lost days at work and school. San Joaquin County annually accounts for among the worst death rates from diabetes among all 58 California counties. In an attempt to make its estimated 60,000 residents with diabetes aware of the many local resources available to help them deal with the disease, a dozen billboards in English and Spanish have been posted around the county directing readers to the UniteForDiabetesSJC.org website. At that website is information on numerous free classes and programs that provide education and training on preventing diabetes, managing the disease, controlling its side effects, and links to more resources, including special events and finding a physician. For questions on how to navigate the website or find a class, residents may call Vanessa Armendariz, community project manager at the San Joaquin Medical Society, at(209) 952-5299. The billboards came about through the efforts of the Diabetes Work Group, a subcommittee of San Joaquin County Public Health’s Obesity and Chronic Disease Prevention Task Force. Funding was provided through a grant from Kaiser Permanente Community Benefit Programs Division-Central Valley Area.

Senior Gateway Website: Don’t Be a Victim

California Insurance Commissioner Dave Jones has unveiled a new consumer protection tool for California seniors, who have traditionally been prime targets for con artists. The California Department of Insurance (CDI) is hosting a new Web site www.seniors.ca.gov to educate seniors and their advocates and provide helpful information about how to avoid becoming victims of personal or financial abuse. The Web site, called Senior Gateway, is important because seniors, including older veterans, are disproportionately at risk of being preyed upon financially and subjected to neglect and abuse. The Senior Gateway is sponsored by the Elder Financial Abuse Interagency Roundtable (E-FAIR), convened by CDI and includes representatives from many California agencies who share a common purpose of safeguarding the welfare of California’s seniors. “The goal of this collaborative effort is to assemble, in one convenient location, valuable information not only for seniors, but their families and caregivers. This site will help California seniors find resources and solve problems, and will enable participating agencies to better serve this important segment of our population,” Jones said. The site offers seniors valuable tips and resources in the following areas, and more:

  • Avoiding and reporting abuse and neglect by in-home caregivers or in facilities; learn about different types of abuse and the warning signs.
  • Preventing and reporting financial fraud, abuse and scams targeting seniors.
  • Understanding health care, insurance, Medicare and long-term care; know what long-term care includes.
  • Locating services and programs available to assist older adults.
  • Knowing your rights before buying insurance; what seniors need to know about annuities.
  • Investing wisely and understanding the ins and outs of reverse mortgages.

$5,000 Grants Help Pay for Children’s Medical Expenses

UnitedHealthcare Children’s Foundation (UHCCF) is seeking grant applications from families in need of financial assistance to help pay for their child’s health care treatments, services or equipment not covered, or not fully covered, by their commercial health insurance plan. Qualifying families can receive up to $5,000 to help pay for medical services and equipment such as physical, occupational and speech therapy, counseling services, surgeries, prescriptions, wheelchairs, orthotics, eyeglasses and hearing aids. To be eligible for a grant, children must be 16 years of age or younger. Families must meet economic guidelines, reside in the United States and have a commercial health insurance plan. Grants are available for medical expenses families have incurred 60 days prior to the date of application as well as for ongoing and future medical needs. Parents or legal guardians may apply for grants at www.uhccf.org, and there is no application deadline. Organizations or private donors can make tax-deductible donations to the foundation at this website. In 2011, UHCCF awarded more than 1,200 grants to families across the United States for treatments associated with medical conditions such as cancer, spina bifida, muscular dystrophy, diabetes, hearing loss, autism, cystic fibrosis, Down syndrome, ADHD and cerebral palsy.

Facts About Fruits and Vegetables

Click here for lots of great information about fruits and vegetables.

ONGOING

Cambodian and Hmong Language Diabetes Classes

The Cambodian and Hmong communities of Stockton are invited to attend free diabetes classes presented in the Khmer and Hmong languages. Call Jou Moua at (209) 298-2374 or (209) 461-3224 to find a class.

Fit Families for Life

Fit Families for Life is a weekly class for parents offered by HealthNet and held at Fathers and Families of San Joaquin, 338 E. Market St., Stockton. All parents are welcome and there is no cost to attend. Participants will learn about nutrition, cooking and exercise. Information and registration: Renee Garcia at (209) 941-0701.

Journey to Control Diabetes Education Program

Mondays 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.: Dameron Hospital offers a free diabetes education program, with classes held in the Dameron Hospital Annex, 445 W. Acacia St., Stockton. Preregistration is required. Contact Carolyn Sanders, RN, at c.sanders@dameronhospital.org(209) 461-3136 or (209) 461-7597.

Al-Anon Freedom to Change Support Group

Mondays and Thursdays 7 to 8:30 p.m.: Lodi Health offers Al-Anon Freedom to Change meetings for family and friends of problem drinkers. The group helps people to know what to do when someone close to them drinks too much. Meetings are offered several times each month at Lodi Memorial Hospital, 975 S. Fairmont Ave., Lodi. Information: www.lodihealth.org.

Man-to-Man Prostate Cancer Support Group

First Monday of Month 7 to 9 p.m.: Dameron Hospital, 525 W. Acacia St., Stockton, holds a support group for men diagnosed with prostate cancer and their families and caregivers. The meetings are facilitated by trained volunteers who are prostate cancer survivors. Information: Ernest Pontiflet at (209) 952-9092.

Crystal Meth Anonymous Recovery Group

Mondays 6:30 p.m.: 825 Central Ave., Lodi. Information: (209) 430-9780 or (209) 368-0756.

Yoga for People Dealing with Cancer

Mondays 5:30 to 7 p.m.: This free weekly Yoga & Breathing class for cancer patients will help individuals sleep better and reduce pain. This class is led by yoga instructor Chinu Mehdi in Classrooms 1 and 2, St. Joseph’s Medical Center, 1800 N. California St., Stockton. Information: (209) 467-6550 orSJCancerInfo@dignityhealth.org.

Respiratory Support Group for Better Breathing

First Tuesday of month 10 to 11 a.m.: Lodi Health’s Respiratory Therapy Department and the American Lung Association of California Valley Lode offer a free “Better Breathers’” respiratory-support group for people and their family members with breathing problems including asthma, bronchitis and emphysema. Participants will learn how to cope with chronic lung disease, understand lungs and how they work and use medications and oxygen properly. The group meets at Lodi Health West, 800 S. Lower Sacramento Road, Lodi. Pre-registration is recommended by calling (209) 339-7445. For information on other classes available at Lodi Memorial, visit its website at www.lodihealth.org.

The Beat Goes On Cardiac Support Group

First Tuesday of month 11 a.m. to noon: Lodi Health offers a free cardiac support group at Lodi Health West, 800 S. Lower Sacramento Road, Lodi. “The Beat Goes On” cardiac support group is a community-based nonprofit group that offers practical tools for healthy living to heart disease patients, their families and caregivers. Its mission is to provide community awareness that those with heart disease can live well through support meetings and educational forums. Upcoming topics include exercise, stress management and nutrition counseling services. All are welcomed to attend. Information: (209) 339-7664.

Planned Childbirth Services

Tuesdays 6 to 8 p.m.: Dameron Hospital, 525 W. Acacia St., Stockton, hosts a four-class series which answers questions and prepares mom and her partner for labor and birth. Bring two pillows and a comfortable blanket or exercise mat to each class. These classes are requested during expecting mother’s third trimester. Information/registration: Carolyn Sanders, RN (209) 461-3136 or www.Dameronhospital.org.

Lactation Support Group in Lodi

Tuesdays 10 a.m.: Lodi Health offers The Lactation Club, a support group for breastfeeding moms that is held in Classroom A at Lodi Memorial Hospital, 975 S. Fairmont Ave., Lodi. Lactation consultants are readily available to answer questions and help with breastfeeding issues. A scale will also be on hand to weigh babies. Information: (209) 339.7872 or www.lodihealth.org.

Say Yes to Breastfeeding

Tuesdays 6 to 8 p.m.: Dameron Hospital, 525 W. Acacia St., Stockton, offers a class that outlines the information and basic benefits and risk management of breastfeeding. Topics include latching, early skin-to-skin on cue, expressing milk and helpful hints on early infant feeding. In addition, the hospital offers a monthly Mommy and Me-Breastfeeding support group where mothers, babies and hospital clerical staff meet the second Monday of each month. Information/registration: Carolyn Sanders, RN (209) 461-3136 or www.Dameronhospital.org.

Precious Preemies

Second Tuesday of the month, 9:30 to 10:30 a.m.: Precious Preemies: A Discussion Group for Families Raising Premature Infants and Infants with Medical Concerns required registration and is held at Family Resource Network, Sherwood Executive Center, 5250 Claremont Ave., Suite 148, Stockton. Information: www.frcn.org/calendar.asp or (209) 472-3674 or (800) 847-3030.

Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous

Are you having trouble controlling the way you eat? Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous (FA) is a free Twelve Step recovery program for anyone suffering from food obsession, overeating, undereating or bulimia. For more information or a list of additional meetings throughout the U.S. and the world, call (781) 932-6300 or visitwww.foodaddicts.org.

  • Tuesdays 7 p.m.: Modesto Unity Church, 2547 Veneman Ave., Modesto.
  • Wednesdays 9 a.m.: The Episcopal Church of Saint Anne, 1020 W. Lincoln Road, Stockton.
  • Saturdays 9 a.m.: Tracy Community Church, 1790 Sequoia Blvd. at Corral Hollow, Tracy.

Diabetes: Basics to a Healthy Life

Wednesdays 10 a.m.: Free eight-class ongoing series every Wednesday except the month of September. Click here for detailsSt. Joseph’s Medical Center, Cleveland Classroom, 2102 N. California St., Stockton. Information: (209) 944-8355 or www.StJosephsCares.org/Diabetes.

Break From Stress

Wednesdays 6 to 7 p.m.: St. Joseph’s Medical Center offers the community a break from their stressful lives with Break from Stress sessions. These sessions are free, open to the public, with no pre-registration necessary. Just drop in, take a deep breath and relax through a variety of techniques. Break from Stress sessions are held in St. Joseph’s Cleveland Classroom (behind HealthCare Clinical Lab on California Street just north of the medical center. Information: SJCancerInfo@DignityHealth.org or (209) 467-6550.

Mother-Baby Breast Connection

Wednesdays 1 to 3 p.m.: Join a lactation consultant for support and advice on the challenges of early breastfeeding. Come meet other families and attend as often as you like. A different topic of interest will be offered each week with time for breastfeeding assistance and questions. Pre-registration is required. Call (209) 467-6331. St. Joseph’s Medical Center, Pavilion Conference Room (1st floor), 1800 N. California St., Stockton.

Adult Children With Aging Relatives

Second Wednesday of month 4:30 p.m.: Lodi Health offers an Adult Children with Aging Relatives support group at the Hutchins Street Square Senior Center. Information: (209) 369-4443 or (209) 369-6921.

Diabetes Support Group in Stockton

Third Wednesday of month 5:30 to 7 p.m.: This support group will help you deal with issues of diabetes through avoiding lifelong complications. Accomplished by increasing daily activities, learning to take your medications  properly, and overcoming depression, frustration and feeling alone. Each month there will be resources including dietitians, doctors, pharmacists and literature is available to assist you. Knowledge is power. This is a free program (no registration is required). Monthly meetings will be held at St. Joseph’s Medical Center, 1800 N. California St., Stockton, in the basement Classroom 3. Any questions or comments call Susan Sanchez, RN, Certified Diabetes Educator: (209) 662-9487.

Smoking Cessation Class in Lodi

Wednesdays 3 to 4 p.m.: Lodi Health offers an eight-session smoking-cessation class for those wishing to become smoke free. Classes are held weekly in the Lodi Health Pulmonary Rehabilitation Department at Lodi Memorial Hospital, 975 S. Fairmont Ave., Lodi. Topics covered include benefits of quitting; ways to cope with quitting; how to deal with a craving; medications that help with withdrawal; and creating a support system. Call the Lodi Health Lung Health Line at (209) 339-7445 to register.

Individual Stork Tours At Dameron

Wednesdays 5 to 7 p.m.: Dameron Hospital, 525 W. Acacia St., Stockton, offers 30 minute guided tours that provide expecting parents with a tour of Labor/Delivery, the Mother-Baby Unit and an overview of the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. New mothers are provided information on delivery services, where to go and what to do once delivery has arrived, and each mother can create an individual birthing plan. Information/registration: Carolyn Sanders, RN (209) 461-3136or www.Dameronhospital.org.

Brain Builders Weekly Program

Thursdays 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.: Lodi Health and the Hutchins Street Square Senior Center offer “Brain Builders,” a weekly program for people in the early stages of memory loss. There is a weekly fee of $25. Registration is required. Information or to register, call (209) 369-4443 or (209) 369-6921.

Infant CPR and Safety

Second Thursday of month 5 to 7 p.m.: Dameron Hospital, 525 W. Acacia St., Stockton, offers a class to family members to safely take care of their newborn.  Family members are taught infant CPR and relief of choking, safe sleep and car seat safety.  Regarding infant safety, the hospital offers on the fourth Thursday of each month from 5 to 7 p.m. a NICU/SCN family support group. This group is facilitated by a Master Prepared Clinical Social Worker and the Dameron NICU staff with visits from the hospital’s neonatologist. Information/registration: Carolyn Sanders, RN (209) 461-3136 or www.Dameronhospital.org.

Group Meetings for Alzheimer’s Patients, Caregivers

Thursdays 10 to 11:30 a.m.: The Alzheimer’s Aid Society of Northern California in conjunction with Villa Marche residential care facility conducts a simultaneous Caregiver’s Support Group and Patient’s Support Group at Villa Marche, 1119 Rosemarie Lane, Stockton. Caregivers, support people or family members of anyone with dementia are welcome to attend the caregiver’s group, led by Rita Vasquez. It’s a place to listen, learn and share. At the same time, Alzheimer’s and dementia patients can attend the patient’s group led by Sheryl Ashby. Participants will learn more about dementia and how to keep and enjoy the skills that each individual possesses. There will be brain exercises and reminiscence. The meeting is appropriate for anyone who enjoys socialization and is able to attend with moderate supervision. Information: (209) 477-4858.

Clase Gratuita de Diabetes en Español

Cada segundo Viernes del mes: Participantes aprenderán los fundamentos sobre la observación de azúcar de sangre, comida saludable, tamaños de porción y medicaciones. Un educador con certificado del control de diabetes dará instruccion sobre la autodirección durante de esta clase. Para mas información y registración:(209) 944-8355. Aprenda más de los programas de diabetes en el sitio electronico de St. Joseph’s: www.StJosephsCares.org/Diabetes

Nutrition on the Move Class

Fridays 11 a.m. to noon: Nutrition Education Center at Emergency Food Bank, 7 W. Scotts Ave., Stockton.  Free classes are general nutrition classes where you’ll learn about the new My Plate standards, food label reading, nutrition and exercise, eating more fruits and vegetables, and other tips. Information: (209) 464-7369or www.stocktonfoodbank.org.

Crystal Meth Anonymous Recovery Group

Fridays 6 p.m.: St. Joseph’s Behavioral Health (in trailer at the rear of building), 2510 N. California St., Stockton. Information: (209) 461-2000.

Free Diabetes Class in Spanish

Second Friday of every month: Participants will learn the basics about blood sugar monitoring, healthy foods, portion sizes, medications and self-management skills from a certified diabetic educator during this free class. St. Joseph’s Medical Center, 1800 N. California St., Stockton. Information and registration: (209) 944-8355. Learn more on St. Joseph’s diabetes programs at www.StJosephsCares.org/Diabetes.

National Alliance on Mental Health: Family-to-Family Education

Saturdays 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.: NAMI presents a free series of 12 weekly education classes for friends and family of people with major depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder, borderline personality disorder, panic disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, and co-occurring brain disorders. Classes will be held at 530 W. Acacia St., Stockton (across from Dameron Hospital) on the second floor. Information or to register: (209) 468-3755.

Multiple Sclerosis Self-Help Group

Second Saturday of Every Month 10 a.m. to noon: Multiple Sclerosis Self-Help Group meeting are for family, friends, caregivers and individuals with multiple sclerosis. We invite you to join us for a few moments of exchanging ideas and management skills to help you live and work with multiple sclerosis, a chronic disease. Meetings are at St. Joseph’s Medical Center, 1800 N. California St., Stockton, in Classroom 1 in the basement. Information: Laurie (209) 915-1730 or Velma (209) 951-2264.

All Day Prepared Childbirth Class

Third Saturday of month 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.: Dameron Hospital, 525 W. Acacia St., Stockton, offers community service educational class of prebirth education and mentoring. Information/registration: Carolyn Sanders, RN (209) 461-3136 or www.Dameronhospital.org.

Big Brother/Big Sister

Second Sunday of month: Dameron Hospital, 525 W. Acacia St., Stockton, has a one-hour class meeting designed specifically for newborn’s siblings. Topics include family role, a labor/delivery tour and a video presentation which explains hand washing/germ control and other household hygiene activities. This community service class ends with a Certification of Completion certificate. Information/registration: Carolyn Sanders, RN (209) 461-3136 or www.Dameronhospital.org.

Outpatient Program Aimed at Teens

Two programs: Adolescents face a number of challenging issues while trying to master their developmental milestones. Mental health issues (including depression), substance abuse and family issues can hinder them from mastering the developmental milestones that guide them into adulthood. The Adolescent Intensive Outpatient Program (IOP) offered by St. Joseph’s Behavioral Health Center, 2510 N. California St., Stockton, is designed for those individuals who need comprehensive treatment for their mental, emotional or chemical dependency problems. This program uses Dialectical Behavioral Therapy to present skills for effective living. Patients learn how to identify and change distorted thinking, communicate effectively in relationships and regain control of their lives. The therapists work collaboratively with parents, doctors and schools. They also put together a discharge plan so the patient continues to get the help they need to thrive into adulthood.

  • Psychiatric Adolescent IOP meets Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays from 4 to 7:30 p.m.
  • Chemical Recovery Adolescent IOP meets Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays from 4 to 7 p.m.

For more information about this and other groups, (209) 461-2000 and ask to speak with a behavioral evaluator or visit www.StJosephsCanHelp.org.

Stork Tours in Lodi

Parents-to-be are offered individual tours of the Lodi Memorial Hospital Maternity Department, 975 S. Fairmont Ave., Lodi. Prospective parents may view the labor, delivery and recovery areas of the hospital and ask questions of the nursing staff. Phone (209) 339-7879 to schedule a tour. For more information on other classes offered by Lodi Health, visit www.lodihealth.org.

HOSPITALS and MEDICAL GROUPS

Community Medical Centers

Click here for Community Medical Centers (Channel Medical Clinic, San Joaquin Valley Dental Group, etc.) website.

Dameron Hospital Events

Click here for Dameron Hospital’s Event Calendar.

Doctors Hospital of Manteca Events

Click here for Doctors Hospital of Manteca Events finder.

Hill Physicians

Click here for Hill Physicians website.

Kaiser Permanente Central Valley

Click here for Kaiser Central Valley News and Events

Lodi Memorial Hospital

Click here for Lodi Memorial Hospital.

Mark Twain Medical Center

Click here for Mark Twain Medical Center in San Andreas.

Planned Parenthood Mar Monte

Click here to find a Planned Parenthood Health Center near you.

San Joaquin General Hospital

Click here for San Joaquin General Hospital website.

St. Joseph’s Medical Center Classes and Events

Click here for St. Joseph’s Medical Center’s Classes and Events.

Sutter Gould Medical Foundation

Click here for Sutter Gould news. Click here for Sutter Gould calendar of events.

Sutter Tracy Community Hospital Education and Support

Click here for Sutter Tracy Community Hospital events, classes and support groups.

PUBLIC HEALTH

San Joaquin County Public Health Services General Information

Ongoing resources for vaccinations and clinic information are:

  1. Public Health Services Influenza website, www.sjcphs.org
  2. Recorded message line at (209) 469-8200, extension 2# for English and 3# for Spanish.
  3. For further information, individuals may call the following numbers at Public Health Services:
  • For general vaccine and clinic questions, call (209) 468-3862;
  • For medical questions, call (209) 468-3822.

Health officials continue to recommend these precautionary measures to help protect against acquiring influenza viruses:

  1. Wash your hands often with soap and water or use alcohol based sanitizers.
  2. Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue or your sleeve, when you cough or sneeze.
  3. Stay home if you are sick until you are free of a fever for 24 hours.
  4. Get vaccinated.

Public Health Services Clinic Schedules (Adults and Children)

Immunization clinic hours are subject to change depending on volume of patients or staffing. Check the Public Health Services website for additional evening clinics or special clinics at www.sjcphs.org. Clinics with an asterisk (*) require patients to call for an appointment.

Stockton Health Center: 1601 E. Hazelton Ave.; (209) 468-3830.

  • Immunizations: Monday 1-4 p.m.; Tuesday 1-4 p.m.; Wednesday 10 a.m.-1 p.m.; Thursday 8-11 a.m. and 1-4 p.m.; Friday 8-11 a.m.
  • Travel clinic*: Thursday 8-11 a.m. and 1 to 4 p.m.
  • Health exams*: Tuesday 1-4 p.m.; Wednesday 10 a.m.-1 p.m.; Friday 8-11 a.m.
  • Sexually transmitted disease clinic: Wednesday 3-6 p.m. and Friday 1-4 p.m., walk-in and by appointment.
  • Tuberculosis clinic*: Tuesday; second and fourth Wednesday of the month.
  • HIV testing: Tuesday 1-4 p.m.; Thursday 1-4 p.m.

Manteca Health Center: 124 Sycamore Ave.; (209) 823-7104 or (800) 839-4949.

  • Immunizations: Wednesday 10 a.m.-1 p.m. and 3-6 p.m.
  • Tuberculosis clinic*: first and third Wednesday 3-6 p.m.
  • HIV testing: first Wednesday 1:30-4 p.m.

Lodi Health Center: 300 W. Oak St.; (209) 331-7303 or (800) 839-4949.

  • Immunizations: Friday 8-11 a.m. and 1-4 p.m.
  • Tuberculosis clinic*: Friday 8-11 a.m. and 1-4 p.m.
  • HIV testing: second and fourth Friday 1:30-4 p.m.

WIC (Women, Infants & Children) Program

Does your food budget need a boost? The WIC Program can help you stretch your food dollars. This special supplemental food program for women, infants and children serves low-income women who are currently pregnant or have recently delivered, breastfeeding moms, infants, and children up to age 5. Eligible applicants receive monthly checks to use at any authorized grocery store for wholesome foods such as fruits and vegetables, milk and cheese, whole-grain breads and cereals, and more. WIC shows you how to feed your family to make them healthier and brings moms and babies closer together by helping with breastfeeding. WIC offers referrals to low-cost or free health care and other community services depending on your needs. WIC services may be obtained at a variety of locations throughout San Joaquin County:

Stockton (209) 468-3280

  • Public Health Services WIC Main Office, 1145 N. Hunter St.: Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Wednesday 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.; open two Saturdays a month.
  • Family Health Center, 1414 N. California St.: Wednesday 8 a.m. to noon, 1 to 5 p.m.
  • CUFF (Coalition United for Families), 2044 Fair St.: Thursday 8 a.m. to noon, 1 to 5 p.m.
  • Taylor Family Center, 1101 Lever Blvd.: Wednesday 8 a.m. to noon, 1 to 4 p.m.
  • Transcultural Clinic, 4422 N. Pershing Ave. Suite D-5: Tuesday 8 a.m. to noon, 1 to 5 p.m.

Manteca  (209) 823-7104

  • Public Health Services, 124 Sycamore Lane: Tuesday, Thursday, Friday 8 a.m. to noon, 1 to 5 p.m.

Tracy (209) 831-5930

  • Public Health Services, 205 W. Ninth St.: Monday, Wednesday 8 a.m. to noon, 1 to 5 p.m.

Flu Shots in Calaveras County

Fall brings cooler temperatures and the start of the flu season. Getting flu vaccine early offers greater protection throughout flu season. The Calaveras County Public Health Department recommends everyone 6 months of age and older get flu vaccine every year. Flu season can start as early as October and continue through March. “Seasonal flu can be serious,” said Dr. Dean Kelaita, Calaveras County health officer. “Every year people die from the flu.” Some children, youth and adults are at risk of serious illness and possibly death if they are not protected from the flu. They need to get flu vaccine now.

  • Adults 50 years of age and over.
  • Pregnant women.
  • Children and youth 5-18 years on long-term aspirin therapy.
  • Everyone with chronic health conditions (including diabetes, kidney, heart or lung disease).

If you care for an infant less than 6 months or people with chronic health conditions, you can help protect them by getting your flu vaccine. Even if you had a flu vaccination last year, you need another one this year to be protected and to protect others who are at risk. The Public Health Department will offer five community flu clinics:

  • Every Monday (3 to 5:30 p.m.) and Thursday (8 a.m. to noon): Calaveras County Public Health, 700 Mountain Ranch Road, Suite C2, San Andreas. The monthly Valley Springs Immunization Clinic (third Tuesday, 3 to 5:30 pm) will also offer flu vaccine during flu season.

The flu vaccine is $16.  Medicare Part B is accepted.  No one will be denied service due to inability to pay. For more information about the vaccine or the clinics, contact the Public Health Department at (209) 754-6460 or visit the Public Health website at www.calaveraspublichealth.com.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

What You Need to Know About Joe’s Health Calendar

Have a health-oriented event the public in San Joaquin County should know about? Let me know at jgoldeen@recordnet.com and I’ll get it into my Health Calendar. I’m not interested in promoting commercial enterprises here, but I am interested in helping out nonprofit and/or community groups, hospitals, clinics, physicians and other health-care providers. Look for five categories: Community Events, News, Ongoing, Hospitals & Medical Groups, and Public Health. TO THE PUBLIC: I won’t list an item here from a source that I don’t know or trust. So I believe you can count on what you read here. If there is a problem, please don’t hesitate to let me know at (209) 546-8278 or jgoldeen@recordnet.com. Thanks, Joe

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    Joe Goldeen

    Joe Goldeen has been with The Record since 1990. He is an award-winning journalist and member of the California Endowment Health Journalism Fellowship. He is a native of Northern California with a bachelors degree in political economy from the ... Read Full
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