Readers Photo Challenge: High water marks

The current Readers Photo Challenge assignment of “water” as very timely one. During the past 4 years of one of the state’s worst droughts a common saying was “ we need the rain” whenever a rare storm would hit. I think we can stop saying that for a while now.

We have been beset upon by storms that ran the gamut from light to torrential. Flooding of low-lying areas was common and some area levees broke or threatened to break. Oroville Dam was in danger of collapsing prompting a mass evacuation of that area. If one couldn’t find any water it was only because they weren’t looking. Twenty readers sent in 90 photos here are some of the top picks.

______________________________________

With all the storms and flooding it was easy to view water in a larger overall context. Mike Ratekin of French Camp looked at things in another way. He went small.

Using a Canon EOS Rebel T5i DSLR camera he mounted a Canon 55-250mm to it with a reversing ring. It attaches the lens to the camera backwards. It allows for a cheaper alternative to close up photograph than buying a macro lens. Ratekin’s results were anything but cheap.

He captured raindrops clinging to the underside of an orchid at his home. He focused on a large drop and his set up’s inherent minimal depth of field caused everything else to go out of focus turning them into just
smears of subtle color which gave his picture an impressionistic quality.

______________________________________

It seems that in the last few weeks that all the water in the world was focused upon us here in California. It was easy to forget that there’s water all over the world.

Steven Rapaport of Stockton recently took a trip to Austrailia and Tasmania . While standing on a bridge over the Yarra River which runs through Melbourne, Rapaport had a view of the city’s skyline. With an Apple iPhone 7 he captured the Melbourne’s main waterway with the city’s skyscrapers in the background. While river tours are popular during the day, in the evening, when this photo was taken, the river is relatively quiet. However, Rapaport was able to capture a gondolier piloted his craft up the river who made a perfect focal point to the shot.

______________________________________

Richard Thomas of Stockton used a Samsung Galaxy Note 5 smartphone to photograph a puddle on Fort Donaldson Street in Stockton. Slight ripples in the water distort the reflection of the surrounding trees making it look like a window into alternate dimension.

______________________________________

Erv Rifenberg of Lodi photographed his wife April with an Apple iPhone 5 as she gingerly crossed a partially submerged gangway which was covered by the rising waters of the south fork of the Mokelumne River while making her way to a boat shed at Tower Park Marina in Terminus as friend Janina Jakubek looked on.

______________________________________

Carolyn Silva of Jackson used a Nikon D5000 DSLR camera to photograph the water flowing around a stick in Sutter Creek in the Mother Lode town of Sutter Creek. Her thoughtful use of a slow shutter speed blurred the rushing water making it look like it was moving even faster. The white water kicked up by the stick stands out against the rest of the brown sediment-filled creek.

______________________________________

Ken Class of Stockton didn’t have to go too far to find his water photo. He used his Apple iPhone 6 to photograph raindrops as the beaded up on the hood of his car. His use of skim lighting with the light coming from an angle behind the water drops combined with the resulting shadows give the drops shape and depth.

______________________________________

A part of photography is trying to see things in a different way. Sydney Spurgeon of Stockton saw her friends Darien Fields, left, and Tyler Stewart reflected in a large puddle on Eight Mile Road west of I-5 in Stockton. She photographed them with her Nikon D90 DSLR camera but intentionally cropped them out leaving only their upside down reflections making for a topsy-turvey image.

______________________________________

Mariah Thomas of Stockton employed a long 2-minute exposure to photograph a rainstorm in her backyard. The long streaks of raindrops combined with the moody lighting make her photo look like the proverbial “dark and stormy” night.

______________________________________

Teresa Mahnken used a Nikon D3300 DLR camera to photograph the waterfall from the reflecting pond at DeCarli Waterfront Plaza in downtown Stockton. The cascading water is streaked by Mahnken’s use of a slow shutter speed. That, combined with the algae clinging to the concrete steps of the manmade falls, creates a unique texture to the photo that’s appealing.

______________________________________

As much as all the water we’ve gotten was needed I think we’re at a point where enough is enough. Dave Skinner of Stockton photographed the intersection of Franklin Boulevard and Twin Cities Road near Thornton. As storm clouds recede in the distance, rising floodwaters rush over the pavement and the stop sign on the ground, partially underwater, signal the hope for a drier day.

______________________________________

As always all of the photos can be seen in a photo gallery at Recordnet.com. A new challenge will be issued next Thursday.

This entry was posted in Readers Photo Challenge and tagged . Bookmark the permalink. Post a comment

Post a Comment

You must be logged in to post a comment.

We reserve the right to remove any content at any time from this Community, including without limitation if it violates the Community Rules. We ask that you report content that you in good faith believe violates the above rules by clicking the Flag link next to the offending comment or fill out this form.
  • Blog Author

    Clifford Oto

    Clifford Oto, an award-winning photographer, has been with The Record since 1984. Through the changes from black and white to digital photography, he’s kept his focus on covering the events, people and life of San Joaquin county. This blog deals ... Read Full
  • Categories

  • Archives