High fives

At a recent Stockton Ports baseball game against the Inland Empire 66ers, Ports’ catcher Petey Paramore hit a 2-run homer in the bottom of the third inning. Jeremy Barfield, who made it to first ahead of Paramore on a walk, crossed home plate and waited to congratulate his teammate.


(Camera: Nikon D300. Lens: Nikkor 300mm w/1.7 extender @ 500mm. Exposure: 1/1000th sec. @ f/4.8. ISO: 400)

As Paramore approached both he and Barfield raised their right hands in preparation of a celebratory gesture. But as the gap between them closed Paramore’s hand was opened up for a high five while Barfield’s remained closed, ready for a forearm bump. When they connected it was an awkward hybrid of the two.


(Camera: Nikon D300. Lens: Nikkor 300mm w/1.7 extender @ 500mm. Exposure: 1/1000th sec. @ f/4.8. ISO: 400)

Along with the high-five and forearm bump there’s also the fist bump, chest bump and butt pat, among others. Some go in and out of fashion while new ones are invented from time to time. My personal favorite is one that I’ve seen volleyball players do. A double high-five is swept down in a single continuous motion to a dual simultaneous clap at the bottom of the arc.


(Camera: Nikon D300. Lens: Nikkor 300mm w/1.7 extender @ 500mm. Exposure: 1/1000th sec. @ f/4.8. ISO: 400)

One of the things that they have in common is that no one can give a definitive answer to where they started or who started them. Who knows, maybe Paramore and Barfield’s slip may become the next fad in sports celebrations?

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