Wolfgang Puck recipe



• 1 large cage-free egg

• 1 teaspoon granulated sugar

• Pinch of salt

• 1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour

• 3 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted, plus 1 tablespoon reserved for cooking

• 2/3 cup milk

• 3 cups apricot preserves or other chunky fruit preserves


In a small stainless-steel mixing bowl, whisk the egg until lightly frothy. Whisk in the sugar and salt; then, little by little, whisk in the flour.

Continue whisking while drizzling in the 3 tablespoons of butter. Finally, still stirring with the whisk, gradually pour in the milk until a smooth batter forms.

Place a fine-meshed wire strainer over another mixing bowl. Pour the batter through the strainer to eliminate any lumps. Cover the batter with plastic wrap and leave it in the refrigerator to rest for at least 1 hour or as long as overnight.

Before cooking the crepes, remove the batter from the refrigerator and stir briefly with the whisk to combine all the ingredients until smooth.

With a clean basting brush, brush a 12-inch nonstick frying pan with some of the reserved melted butter. Heat the pan over medium-low heat.

Ladle about 1 ounce of the batter into the pan while lifting the handle of the pan with your other hand and swirling the batter to coat the bottom of the pan thinly but evenly with the batter. Return the pan to the heat and cook until golden brown, about 1 minute per side, gently turning the crepe over.

As each crepe is done, transfer to a plate and cover with foil to keep warm. Repeat the process with the remaining batter, stacking the crepes.

While the crepes are cooking, gently warm the jam in a saucepan over medium-low heat, stirring occasionally.

When all the crepes are done, spoon 2 tablespoons of the warm jam into the center of a crepe. Roll up the crepe or fold it over twice to form a quarter-circle shape. Repeat with the remaining crepes and jam.

Arrange the crepes on individual serving plates. Hold a small, fine-meshed sieve over a plate of crepes, spoon a little confectioner’s sugar into it, and tap the sieve to dust the crepes lightly with sugar. Repeat with the remaining crepes and serve.

Makes about 2 dozen crepes, serving eight to 12 people.

Posted in Food, Recipes | Leave a comment


1 hour, plus chilling time. Serves 8



• 2 cups flour

• 1 teaspoon kosher salt

• 1 tablespoon granulated sugar

• 1 cup (2 sticks) cold butter, cut into 1/4-inch cubes

• 1/4 cup ice water, more if needed


In a large bowl, combine the flour, salt and sugar. Add the butter cubes and toss them in the flour to coat. Using your fingertips, progressively separate the butter into smaller pieces while tossing them back into the dry ingredients until the mixture resembles a coarse meal.

Make a well in the center and drizzle over 4 tablespoons of water. If too dry, add additional water, a tablespoon at a time. Combine and shape into a ball. Flatten into a disk, wrap with plastic film and refrigerate for 30 minutes.

When ready to shape the pie shell, flour a working surface generously and roll the dough with a rolling pin until it’s very thin — about 1/4 inch thick. Cut a dough circle large enough to fit into a 9-inch pie pan — don’t forget to account for an extra half inch of dough to crimp a decorative edge. Lightly coat the pie tin with nonstick spray and lay the dough circle inside the tin. Gather the excess dough around the edges and crimp as desired. Refrigerate the pie shell for at least one hour or up to two days.

Set an oven rack to the middle position, and heat the oven to 350 degrees. To pre-bake the pie shell, coat it lightly with nonstick spray, line the bottom with a circle of parchment paper and fill it with dried beans or rice to weigh down the dough and prevent it from puffing while in the oven. Bake for 30 minutes, carefully lift the parchment circle to remove the beans and bake for an additional 5 to 10 minutes or until it’s a deep golden brown. Take out of the oven and set aside to cool completely.




• 6 cups strawberries, halved

• 2 tablespoons port wine, creme de cassis or framboise

• 1 1/2 teaspoons gelatin powder

• Pinch kosher salt

• 3 tablespoons cornstarch

• 1 cup sugar

• 1 vanilla bean


While the pie shell is baking, start working on the strawberry sauce. Puree 2 cups of the strawberries in a blender until completely liquefied. Add the port, gelatin powder, salt and cornstarch, and blend for another minute.

Put sugar in a medium-sized, heavy-bottomed pot and add about 1/2 cup of water just to moisten the sugar. Split the vanilla bean lengthwise with a pairing knife, scrape out the pulp with the back of the knife, and put the pulp and the pod into the pot. Cook over high heat without stirring until the mixture comes to a boil, reduce the heat to medium and let it reduce until it resembles a thick syrup. Add the strawberry puree and cook over medium heat for 5 minutes while stirring constantly; the mixture will be thick. Transfer the mixture to a bowl and let cool to room temperature.

Gently toss the rest of the strawberries with the cooled strawberry mixture until they’re all evenly covered. Add the strawberry filling in the prepared shell so it makes a mound in the middle, packing it lightly with your hand so the strawberries stick together. Refrigerate until ready to serve.

Posted in Food, Recipes | Leave a comment

Stone Fruit Recipe



For pie crust

• 1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour

• 1/2 teaspoon salt (preferably kosher or sea salt)

• 1 tablespoon granulated white sugar

• 1/2 cup cold unsalted butter, cut into small pieces

• 1/8 to 1/4 cup ice water

Peach and nectarine filling

• 1 1/2 pounds fresh ripe peaches and nectarines (roughly half and half)

• 1/8 teaspoon salt (preferably kosher or sea salt)

• 3-4 tablespoons granulated white sugar


For pie crust

In a food processor, place the flour, salt, and sugar and process until combined. Add the butter and process until the mixture resembles coarse meal (about 15 seconds). Pour about 1/8 cup water in a slow, steady stream through the feed tube until the pastry just holds together when pinched. Add the remaining water, a little at a time, if necessary.

Gather pastry into a ball, cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for about one hour.

Once the pastry has chilled, remove from refrigerator and place on a lightly floured surface. Roll the pastry into a 13-inch round. To prevent the pastry from sticking to the counter, and to ensure uniform thickness, keep lifting up and turning the pastry a quarter turn as you roll (always roll from the center of the pastry outwards to get uniform thickness). Transfer the pastry to a parchment paper-lined baking sheet. Cover and place in the refrigerator while you prepare the peaches.

Heat your oven to 425 degrees.

For filling

Cut the peaches and nectarines in half, remove the pits, and cut into 1 inch wedges (slices).

Place the peach and nectarine slices in a large bowl and season with the salt. Then add the sugar and gently toss to combine.

Arrange the peach and nectarine slices on the pastry, placing them as close together as you can, without overlapping the slices too much. Leave about two inches for the border.

Scrape any remaining sugar from the bowl and drizzle over top of the fruit. Gently fold the edges of the pastry up and over the peaches and nectarines, pleating as necessary. Make sure to seal any cracks in the pastry.

Bake in a preheated oven for about 35-40 minutes or until the pastry is golden brown, and the peaches and nectarines are tender when gently pierced with a sharp knife. Remove from oven and place on a wire rack to cool. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Makes about 6-8 servings.

— Adapted from thejoyofbaking.com

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Ricotta Recipes


For fact-checkers, know that ricotta means “twice cooked” in Italian. There, it’s made from the whey left when making mozzarella. Since we’re making it from scratch, our recipe is kind of a “faux ricotta.” Delicious, all the same. Use fresh milk, cream and freshly squeezed lemon juice. The recipe doubles easily, but best to make a smaller amount the first time. Find cheesecloth in most hardware and grocery stores; it is necessary to keep small curds from escaping through the holes in the colander.


• 2 quarts whole milk

• 1/2 cup heavy cream

• 1 teaspoon kosher salt

• 1/4 cup fresh, strained lemon juice


Line a colander with 3 to 4 layers of lightly dampened cheesecloth, and set it in, or over, a larger bowl. Clip a candy thermometer to the side of a heavy-duty 7- to 8-quart pot. Pour the milk and cream into the pot and slowly warm the mixture over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until the thermometer registers 185 degrees, about 20 minutes. Watch carefully, as milk likes to scorch.

Remove from the heat; add the salt and stir until it dissolves. Slowly pour the lemon juice over the surface of the milk. Once all of the juice has been added, stir gently, using a slow lifting motion, for 1 to 2 minutes to encourage curds to form. When you begin to see the curds form, slowest stirring is essential. Gently transfer the curds into the colander using a strainer or perforated ladle. Do not pour the mixture.

The draining time determines the ricotta’s firmness. Fold the ends of the cheesecloth over the curds to lightly cover, and allow to drain anywhere from 30 minutes (for soft curds) to 4 hours (for a rather firm, dry cheese). Transfer the fresh ricotta to a jar, cover and refrigerate.

Makes about 2 1/2 cups.

— Adapted from Fine Cooking



This is a quick and easy weekday supper. Because I cook for two, I sauté half the gnocchi and freeze the rest. You can also sauté the gnocchi and serve them with a simple tomato sauce. If you make a batch of caramelized onions in advance, you can almost pretend they are pierogies, but with a subtle and more complex flavor.


For the gnocchi:

• 3/4 cup flour, plus additional for dusting

• 1/4 cup (3 ounces) Parmesan cheese, freshly grated

• Zest of 1 lemon, grated

• 1 cup (8 ounces) whole milk ricotta cheese, drained

• 1 large egg

• Pinch salt

For the sauce:

• 6 tablespoons unsalted butter

• 1/2 shallot, thinly sliced (about 1/4 cup)

• 12 to 18 sage leaves

• 1 garlic clove, thinly sliced

• Juice of 1 lemon

• 2 tablespoons water

• 1/3 cup (about 2 1/2 ounces) Parmesan cheese, freshly grated

• 2 tablespoons parsley leaves, chopped

• Chopped hazelnuts, optional


Combine flour, Parmesan cheese and lemon zest in bowl. In another bowl, mix ricotta cheese, egg and salt. Add to the flour mixture and stir until the dough just comes together. Do not overwork or the dough can toughen.

Scrape the dough onto a well-floured work surface. Divide the dough into 4 sections. Using your hands, lightly roll each piece into a 12-inch rope. Cut each rope into 1/2-inch pieces. Place pieces on 2 floured paper plates and refrigerate for 30 minutes or up to two hours to rest.

Heat butter over medium-high heat in a sauté pan large enough to accommodate all gnocchi without crowding, but not so wide that the sauce evaporates. When butter foams, add gnocchi and cook, until light brown on all sides, about, 5-6 minutes. Use a spoon and a chopstick to flip the gnocchi.

When gnocchi are almost cooked, lower the heat to medium and add shallot and sage leaves; cook briefly, to release flavors, then add garlic, lemon juice and water. Cook briefly, allowing sauce to thicken a bit. Add Parmesan cheese and chopped parsley. Toss to coat the gnocchi.

Spoon gnocchi and sauce into shallow bowls, top with a sprinkling of hazelnuts and serve right away.

Makes about 40 pieces.

— Chef Michael Symon



If you buy the shells, you can have “homemade” cannoli any day you like. Drain the ricotta in a strainer set over a bowl for at least a half hour before making the filling. You can sweeten and spice to taste.


• 2 cups whole-milk ricotta, well-drained

• 3/4 cup confectioner’s sugar, or to taste

• 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

• 1/4 teaspoon ground allspice

• Zest of a small lemon

• Pinch fine salt

• 1/4 cup heavy cream, whipped fairly stiff

• Mini-chocolate chips, about 1/3 cup, divided

• Powdered sugar for dusting

• 6 large or 12 small cannoli shells


For the filling: in a medium bowl, whisk the ricotta until smooth. Sift in the confectioner’s sugar and spices; add the lemon zest and salt. In a separate bowl, whip the cream until fairly stiff. Using a rubber spatula, gently fold the cream into the ricotta mixture. Stir in half the chocolate chips. Refrigerate for at least 1/2 hour.

To fill the cannoli: just before serving, use a pastry (or plastic) bag without a tip to pipe the ricotta into the cannoli shells. Fill them from both ends so the cream runs through the whole shell. Dust with a sifting of powdered sugar and dip ends into remaining chocolate chips.

Makes 6 large or 12 small cannoli.

— Marlene Parrish


Posted in Food, Recipes | Leave a comment

Trout recipe



• 2 (12-ounce) boned rainbow trout, with head and tail

• 1 lime, very thinly sliced

• 1 bunch fresh dill, divided

• Salt and pepper

• 1 pound small red potatoes

• 4 tablespoons butter, divided

• 4 cloves garlic, sliced

• Juice of 1 lime

• 1 tablespoon water


Preheat oven to 500 degrees.

Line the belly cavity of each trout with lime slices and a few sprigs of dill; set the remaining dill aside. Arrange the lime and dill so they will not fall out of the cavities. Season the outside of the fish with salt and pepper, and reserve.

If the potatoes are larger than a golf ball, cut them into wedges. Place them in a medium pot with enough cold water to barely cover them. Add 1 tablespoon salt and bring to a boil. Immediately drain and allow the potatoes to air dry for a few minutes.

Melt 2 tablespoons of the butter with the garlic in a large ovenproof sauté pan over high heat. As the garlic begins to brown, add the potatoes and toss to coat with the butter. Allow the potatoes to sear in the pan until they begin to brown on one side.

Shake the pan to arrange the potatoes in a single layer — this will be the bed for the trout. Lay the stuffed trout on top of the potatoes and transfer to the oven. Roast until the trout is cooked through, about 12 minutes; check for doneness by gently lifting the belly flap to reveal the meat. If it is an even color all the way through, it is done.

For the lime butter, chop the remaining dill. Combine the lime juice and water in a small saucepan and bring to a boil. Remove from the heat and add the remaining 2 tablespoons butter, swirling the pan until it is all melted into the sauce. Season with salt and add the dill. Serve the butter on the side. Remove lime slices from fish before eating.

Makes two servings.

— Recipe from “For Cod and Country,” by Barton Seaver

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Rhubarb recipes


Don’t let the greenish tint of this savory chicken dish dissuade you from trying it — it is so, so good. Good enough, in fact, to serve to company.


• 5 1/2-pound whole chicken, cut into 8 pieces

• 1 tablespoon plus 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt, more as needed

• 1 teaspoon black pepper, more as needed

• 5 sprigs thyme, preferably lemon thyme

• 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

• 1 bunch spring onions or scallions, white and light-green stalks thinly sliced (slice and reserve greens for garnish)

• 2 stalks green garlic, thinly sliced, or 2 garlic cloves, minced

• 1/2 cup dry white wine

• 3/4 pound fresh rhubarb, cut into 1/2-inch dice (3 cups)

• 1 tablespoon honey, or to taste

• 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into pieces


Pat chicken dry and season with 1 tablespoon salt and 1 teaspoon pepper. Place in a bowl with the thyme sprigs and cover with plastic wrap; refrigerate at least 1 hour or overnight.

Heat oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Remove thyme from bowl with chicken, reserving thyme. Add chicken pieces to skillet and sear, turning occasionally, until golden brown all over, about 10 minutes. Transfer pieces to a platter.

Reduce heat to medium. Stir in onion (white and light-green parts) and cook until softened, about 5 minutes. Add garlic and reserved thyme; cook 1 minute more. Stir in wine and bring to a simmer, scraping up any browned bits in the bottom of pan. Add rhubarb, honey, 1/2 teaspoon salt and a few grinds of pepper.

Return chicken pieces to pot in a single layer. Cover and reduce heat to medium-low. Simmer until chicken is cooked through, 15 to 20 minutes for breasts and 20 to 25 minutes for legs and thighs, transferring chicken pieces to a platter as they finish cooking.

Whisk butter into rhubarb sauce. Taste and adjust seasoning if necessary. Spoon sauce over chicken and garnish with sliced onion greens.

Serves 4.

— Melissa Clark, New York Times



“Don’t stop with shrimp” in this recipe, advise the editors of Sunset. “This sweet-and-sour barbecue sauce promises to be a summer staple, since it’s great on grilled pork chops and chicken, too.”


• 1/2 cup chopped rhubarb (preferably red rather than green)

• 1 tablespoon chopped fresh ginger

• 1 tablespoon chopped garlic

• 1 tablespoon hoisin sauce

• 1/4 cup sugar

• 1 teaspoon reduced-sodium soy sauce

• 1 pound peeled and deveined medium shrimp (36 to 42 per pound)

• 1 green onion, thinly sliced diagonally


Heat a grill to high (450 to 550 degrees). In a medium saucepan over medium heat, cook rhubarb, ginger, garlic, hoisin, sugar, and 1/4 cup water. When rhubarb starts to break apart, about 3 minutes, whisk in soy sauce and transfer half the glaze to a small bowl.

Thread shrimp onto 4 metal skewers. Brush both sides of shrimp with glaze from pan. Grill shrimp, turning and basting generously as you go, until they’re opaque and grill marks appear, about 8 minutes total.

Transfer to a serving plate and brush with glaze from bowl. Sprinkle with onion. Serve with remaining glaze from bowl on the side.

Serves 6.

— Sunset magazine

Posted in Food, Recipes | Leave a comment

Mother’s Day dessert recipe


Prep: 2 hours

Chill: 24 hours

Makes: 12 to 15 servings

Of the three elements in this recipe adapted from “Icebox Cakes,” make the pistachio paste and wafers first. Then 24 hours before serving, whip the cream and assemble the cake. If you want to sub a store-bought cookie, author Jessie Sheehan suggests a thin, crisp cookie such as Jules Destrooper Almond Thins.


• 2 1/4 cups flour

• 1/2 teaspoon salt

• 1 cup sugar

• 3/4 cup unsalted butter, at room temperature

• 1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla

• 1 teaspoon almond extract, or to taste

• 2 tablespoons whole milk

• 1 tablespoon light corn syrup

• 1 cup pistachio paste, see recipe

• 1/2 cup coarsely chopped toasted pistachios

• Pistachio-chocolate whipped cream, see recipe


1. For the wafers, whisk together flour and salt in a medium bowl. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, cream sugar, butter and vanilla and almond extracts on medium-low speed until slightly fluffy, about 2 minutes. Do not overbeat. (You can also mix with electric beater or by hand.) Scrape sides of the bowl with a rubber spatula.

2. In a small bowl, whisk milk and corn syrup to combine. Add milk mixture to the butter-sugar mixture with mixer on medium-low speed; beat until just combined. Scrape sides of the bowl with a rubber spatula. Add pistachio paste; beat just until incorporated. Add flour mixture all at once. On low speed, beat until dough just begins to pull away from the bottom of the bowl and forms a cohesive mass. Scrape sides of the bowl to fully incorporate all ingredients.

3. Divide dough in half; place each half on a sheet of plastic wrap. Loosely wrap dough, forming each half into a log about 2 inches wide. Roll logs along the counter, still wrapped in plastic wrap, to shape into cylinders. Tighten plastic wrap around logs; freeze at least 2 hours or overnight. If dough is too soft to shape into logs, form into a disk (or loose log shape), wrap in plastic wrap, then freeze about 20 minutes or just until cold enough to shape into logs.

4. To bake, unwrap one log; cut into thin (about 1/8-inch) slices, rotating log as you cut to keep it from flattening. Place slices about 1-inch apart on a parchment-lined baking sheet; freeze at least 10 minutes. Repeat with second log. If you need more room for slices, arrange on additional sheets of parchment paper, then layer dough-covered papers on top of each other on a baking sheet in the freezer, switching them out as you bake each batch.

5. Position a rack in the center of the oven; heat to 350 degrees. Bake one baking sheet of frozen rounds until edges begin to brown, 10-12 minutes, rotating sheet halfway through baking. Using a stiff metal or plastic spatula, immediately press down lightly on each cookie to flatten it. Let wafers cool on the baking sheet, 2-3 minutes. Transfer to a wire rack to cool completely. Wafers should be very crispy when cooled. If not, return to the 350 degree oven 1 to 2 minutes longer. Repeat baking additional sheets of dough rounds.

6. While wafers cool, toast 1/2 cup shelled pistachios on a baking sheet in a 350 degree oven until they begin to brown and become fragrant, 10-15 minutes. Stir nuts midway through baking to ensure even toasting.

7. Store cooled wafers immediately in an airtight container. They will remain crispy at room temperature, tightly sealed, for about 24 hours. Freeze baked wafers in a resealable plastic bag up to 1 month; you need not defrost wafers before assembling cake. Makes about 60 wafers.

8. To assemble cake, line a 9-by-5-by-3-inch loaf pan with plastic wrap hanging slightly over sides. Spread a generous layer of pistachio-chocolate whipped cream on the bottom of the lined pan. Cover as much of the cream as possible with a layer of wafers; fill gaps with broken wafers. The goal is a solid layer of wafers. Continue layering whipped cream and wafers until you run out or reach the top of the pan, ending with whipped cream. Gently cover cake with plastic wrap. Refrigerate, 24 hours.

9. Peel plastic wrap from top of cake. Place a serving platter over the cake and invert cake onto the platter. Carefully remove pan and plastic-wrap; sprinkle cake with coarsely chopped toasted pistachios. Slice and serve.

Nutrition information per serving (for 15 servings): 440 calories, 34 g fat, 16 g saturated fat, 82 mg cholesterol, 32 g carbohydrates, 7 g protein, 79 mg sodium, 3 g fiber


Makes: About 6 cups


• 3 cups whipping cream

• 1/2 cup pistachio paste, see recipe

• 1/3 cup each: confectioners’ sugar, Dutch-process cocoa powder

• 1/4 teaspoon almond extract, or to taste

• 1/8 teaspoon salt


Pour cream into a chilled metal bowl; whip on medium speed until just thickened. Add pistachio paste, confectioners’ sugar, cocoa powder, almond extract and salt; whip on medium-high speed until cream holds stiff peaks that stand upright when whisk is raised; the stiffer the cream, the more support it will give wafers in your cake. Use immediately.



Combine 2 cups shelled unsalted pistachios and 1/2 cup granulated sugar in a food processor; pulse until nuts are finely chopped, about 90 seconds. Do not overprocess, or nuts will get too buttery. Transfer processed pistachios to bowl of a stand mixer fitted with paddle attachment. Add 1/4 cup water and 2 tablespoons room-temperature butter; beat on medium speed just until a thick paste forms. (Alternatively, beat with electric beaters.) Paste will keep tightly covered in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks. Makes: about 1 1/2 cups

Posted in Food, Recipes | Leave a comment

Passover recipes to share


Yield: 12 servings


• 4 Gala or McIntosh apples (2 pounds), peeled, cored, seeded and chopped

• 2/3 cup chopped almonds

• 3 tablespoons granulated sugar, or to taste

• 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon

• Grated zest of 1 lemon

• 4 tablespoons sweet wine (port is ideal)


Combine all the ingredients, mixing together thoroughly. Add a little more wine as needed. Chill before serving.

Per serving: 83 calories; 3 g fat; no saturated fat; no cholesterol; 1 g protein; 13 g carbohydrate; 10 g sugar; 2 g fiber; 1 mg sodium; 21 mg calcium.

— Adapted from “Jewish Holiday Cookbook” by Joan Nathan



Yield: 6 to 8 servings


• 2 large bags spinach, washed and cut in small pieces

• 2 cloves garlic, minced

• 1/4 cup olive oil

• 1 teaspoon ground cumin

• 1 teaspoon paprika

• Salt

• Juice of 1 lemon


Cook the spinach in salted water just until wilted. Drain and squeeze out as much water as possible; this is important. This entire step can be eliminated if you have a 14-inch skillet or larger.

In a skillet, sauté the garlic in the oil until golden. Add the spinach, cumin, paprika and salt to taste. Cook until wilted (if you skipped Step 1). Add the lemon juice.

Per serving: 79 calories; 7 g fat; 1 g saturated fat; no cholesterol; 2 g protein; 3 g carbohydrate; no sugar; 1 g fiber; 41 mg sodium; 54 mg calcium.

— Adapted from “Jewish Holiday Cookbook” by Joan Nathan



Yield: 12 servings


• 2 pounds leeks

• 2 large boiling potatoes (not russets), peeled

• 3 large eggs, beaten

• 3 tablespoons matzo meal

• 1/2 cup grated Romano or Parmesan cheese

• Salt and pepper

• Vegetable oil for frying


Wash the leeks carefully, slicing them vertically to remove all of the grit. Dice the white base and the palest green part of the leaves. Parboil in salted water for 5 minutes. Drain.

Boil the potatoes until they are soft. Drain and cool. Using a potato masher or food processor, mash the potatoes. Add the leeks, blending them in well. Add the eggs, matzo meal, cheese and salt and pepper to taste. Form this mixture into 12 patties.

Pour oil 1/2-inch deep in a heavy frying pan. When the oil reaches 375 degrees, drop the patties into the oil, 2 or 3 per batch. Fry until golden brown on each side. Drain on paper towels.

Per serving: 119 calories; 4 g fat; 2 g saturated fat; 51 mg cholesterol; 5 g protein; 16 g carbohydrate; 2 g sugar; 2 g fiber; 87 mg sodium; 71 mg calcium.

— Adapted from “Jewish Holiday Cookbook,” by Joan Nathan

Posted in Food, Recipes, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

How to feed a family of 4 for less than $7


Yield: 4 servings


• 2 (6 1/2-ounce) cans chopped clams

• 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

• 1/4 cup finely chopped onions

• 2 cloves garlic, minced

• 1/2 teaspoon dried oregano

• 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper

• 1/2 cup dry white wine

• 1/4 cup finely chopped Italian flat-leaf parsley

• 1/4 cup coarsely grated Parmesan cheese

• 1 1/2 tablespoons butter

• 12 ounces (3/4 pound) dried linguine, cooked and kept warm


Strain clams through a fine sieve, reserving juice.

In a medium saucepan, combine oil and onions over medium heat and sauté until the onions are translucent, about 3 to 5 minutes. Add garlic, oregano and 1/4 teaspoon of the crushed red pepper, and sauté for 2 minutes.

Pour in the wine and bring to a boil over medium heat. Cook until reduced by half, about 3 to 5 minutes. Add the reserved clam juice and boil until reduced by about one-third, about 3 to 5 minutes. Taste, and add more crushed red pepper if you want it spicier.

Reduce heat to low, stir in the clams and cook for 2 minutes. Remove the sauce from the heat and stir in the parsley and grated Parmesan. Stir in the butter until it melts. Pour over the cooked linguine, toss and serve.

- Adapted from a recipe by Marcella Hazan in “Classic Italian Cooking”



Yield: 4 servings


• 4 medium potatoes, peeled

• 1 medium yellow onion

• 1 green pepper, diced

• 6 eggs

• 2 tablespoons olive oil, divided

• Hot sauce (if desired)


Cut the peeled potatoes in half lengthwise, then cut each half into crosswise slices about 1/8 inch thick (do not use a food processor). Chop the onions into 1/4-inch pieces.

In a large skillet, heat 1 tablespoon of oil over medium-high heat. Add the potatoes and cook, stirring occasionally (covering the pan with a lid will make this go quicker). After about 5 minutes, add the onions and green pepper and continue to cook, stirring occasionally, until the potatoes and peppers are tender, about 5 more minutes. Season heavily with salt; potatoes require a lot of salt. Remove from heat.

In a large mixing bowl, lightly beat eggs. Add the potato-onion mixture and stir until well-mixed.

Add the remaining 1 tablespoon of oil to a large skillet over medium heat and swirl to coat bottom of the pan. Add the egg-potato mixture and cook without stirring until the egg has set around the edges. Check, by lifting an edge, to see if the egg is beginning to brown on the bottom. When it starts to brown, place a large plate over the top of the pan, invert the pan and plate so that the omelet falls onto the plate, and then slide the omelet back into the pan, browned side up.

Cook until the egg is completely set, about 1 or 2 more minutes. Cut into wedges to serve. This goes especially well with hot sauce.

- Recipe by Daniel Neman

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

John Anderson to Lodi Grape Festival

John Anderson, who’s marking his 37th year as an old-school country musician, performs Friday night on the main stage at the Lodi Grape Festival
Anderson, 59, originally from Opapka, Fla., is replacing Little Texas, a four-man country-rock band based in Nashville, Tenn., that had to cancel its scheduled appearance due to illness.
Since 1977, the deep-voiced Anderson — who performed at the San Joaquin County Fair in 1996 — has released 36 albums and 61 singles, six of them reaching No. 1.
Based in Nashville, he’s best known for recordings such as “Seminole Wind,” a platinum CD in 1992, and “I’ve Got a Feelin’ (Somebody’s Stealin’ ”), his 1977 debut single.
Brian Howe, 61, a blues-rock singer from Portsmouth, England, who replaced Paul Rodgers in Bad Company — a classic blues-rock band — performs two showsSaturday.
Fresno’s Jeremy Pearce, a monthly regular at Stockton’s Valley Brewing Company, does his full Elvis Presley tribute show with a four-piece band, memorabilia and a 1977 Cadillac El Dorado, Sunday night.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment
  • Blog Authors

    Kory Hansen

    Kory Hansen, a graduate of California State University, Fresno, began work at The Record in 2004 as a page designer and Graphics Editor. Kory currently lives in Brentwood with his wife and two sons, and spends entirely too much time chasing peacocks ... Read Full
  • Categories

  • Archives