Author Archives: Lee Miller

Lee Miller

Lee Miller is a University of Delaware graduate and retired fisheries biologist, he gardens on 10 acres and makes wine each year with the help of a cadre of friends. However, his first love is gardening and he grows various fruit trees, heirloom tomatoes, gladiolus, daylilies, dahlias and roses among many others. He is a UC Master Gardener and an accredited National Garden Club flower show judge.

Summer garden problems explored

Heat and tomato fruit set: The hot streak we had recently was not good for a lot of plants, but in particular not good for fruit set in tomatoes. Tomato blossoms drop off when daytime temperatures exceed 95 and night-time temperatures are above 70. Tomatoes in the sun may experience temperatures as much as 10 [...]

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Garden downsizing— losses lamented; smaller celebrated

One of the things that Master Gardeners and others teach new gardeners is to not bite off too much when starting to garden. With experience one can take on more efforts if you want to. Here is what one family magazine has to say, “Be realistic when you plan your first garden. Start small; you [...]

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Sages are great perennials in your border

Perennial borders are wonderful. Little or no annual planting, but some pruning and deadheading required from time to time to keep plants flowering. Sage advice is to include some sage plants, in your perennial flower bed. The true sages are Salvias, but Russian sage, Perovskia atriplicifolia, is not a true sage, nor is it from [...]

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Watch what and where you plant!

Horse chestnut planted too close to the home and Cotoneasters too tall for foundation plantings.

I see so many plants that are planted in the wrong place for the size of the plant. ‘Wrong plant wrong place’ perhaps, instead of ‘right plant for the right place’ as our gardening mantra goes. By right plant in the right place we should take into account not only the environmental conditions that the [...]

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Citrus thoughts for spring

It is time to consider caring for your citrus or planting some if you have none and want to enjoy picking your own ripe tangerines, oranges, lemons, limes, pummelos, and grapefruit. There are lots of citrus suitable for planting in San Joaquin County. One of the best to plant is a dwarf, Improved Meyer lemon. [...]

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Some of the good fungus among our plants

On January 13 National Public Radio presented a segment on forests investigations by Suzanne Simard, a forestry ecologist, who worked out how trees in the forest can communicate and share resources by use of underground connections via fungi mycelium. It was very fascinating and the presentation is on TED  http://www.npr.org/2017/01/13/509350471/how-do-trees-collaborate.  One has to wonder if [...]

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Time for seed searching.

A newspaper mulch for onions keeps winter weeds at bay. Lee Miller photo

These past few days the plant and seed catalogues are starting to arrive to remind us that spring is just around the corner. With all the rain lately it is not timely to be in the garden. Walking on wet soil can cause soil compaction, so it is a good time to stay inside. That [...]

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Is a greenhouse in your gardening future?

My greenhouse constructed mostly of salvaged materials.

It will soon be time to start seeds in my greenhouse. I built the greenhouse from material that I scrounged over several years and finally got around to putting it all together about 10 years ago. I have enjoyed my greenhouse so much that I wish that I had built it much sooner. There is [...]

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Please no crepe murders

Crepe myrtles are best left natural or pruned correctly

Winter is almost here and time to dormant prune ornamentals, roses and fruit trees. I am disturbed to see how some people despoil crepe myrtles (Lagerstroemia indica) when they prune them. The pruning technique used is called pollarding and it is defined as a tree cut back nearly to the trunk, so as to produce a [...]

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Water Water, oh if it were only everywhere

A 1000 gallon tank used to water spring greenhouse plantings

The rainy season is here and it is a good time to think about conserving and saving whatever befalls us this season. NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center gives a 70 percent chance of La nina conditions to develop this fall and a 55 percent chance that it will persist through the winter. La nina conditions are [...]

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    Lee Miller

    Lee Miller is a University of Delaware graduate and retired fisheries biologist, he gardens on 10 acres and makes wine each year with the help of a cadre of friends. However, his first love is gardening and he grows various fruit trees, heirloom ... Read Full

    Marcy Sousa

    Marcy Sousa is the San Joaquin County UC Master Gardener Program Coordinator. She is a Stockton native and enjoys teaching others about gardening. She has her bachelors from Stanislaus State in Permaculture. She has been with the program since 2007. Read Full

    Nadia Zane

    Nadia Zane is a UC Master Gardener, a landscape designer and Stockton native. She has a fondness for California native plants and sustainable landscaping, which she utilizes in her work for Native Beauty Garden Design. She is a member of the CA ... Read Full
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